U.S. cancels temporary protection status for Sudanese nationals

September 19, 2017 (WASHINGTON) – The U.S. Administration on Monday has issued a decision to terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Sudanese nationals indicating an improvement of conditions in the East African nation.

The U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security usually designates a foreign country for TPS due to conditions in the country that temporarily prevent the country’s nationals from returning safely. These conditions include ongoing armed conflict, environmental disasters or other extraordinary conditions.

The TPS provides employment authorization and protection from deportation for foreign nationals who cannot be safely returned to their home countries.

Since November 4th, 1997, Sudan has been designated for the TPS allowing Sudanese nationals present in the U.S. and who apply for the benefit to reside and work lawfully and without being subjected to removal from the country.

On January 25, 2016, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced the extension of Sudan for TPS until 2 November 2017.

“The U.S. Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke has determined that conditions in Sudan no longer support its designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) after reviewing country conditions, and after Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials’ consultations with the appropriate U.S. government agencies,” said a press release by the USCIS on Monday

Duke’s decision means that incoming Sudanese nationals to the U.S. will no longer be able to remain in the country due to the inability to return to their home country due to environmental disaster or conflict.

However, Sudanese nationals currently in the U.S. under TPS can maintain their status for one year until they will be illegal residents in the country.

“Acting Secretary Duke is extending benefits for beneficiaries of Sudan TPS for 12 months to allow for an orderly transition before the designation terminates on Nov. 2, 2018,” read the press release.

The U.S. decision comes three weeks before a decision by the Trump Administration on the permanent lift of U.S. sanctions on Sudan on 12 October.