S. Sudan leaders need to ‘reflect’ and ‘come to their sense’

The retired Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Rajaf Diocese, has urged South Sudanese leaders to learn from how Kenya’s political leaders address their differences.

Last week, President Uhuru Kenyatta and his longtime rival Raila Odinga met and resolved to work together for the greater good of the people of Kenya.

This comes almost two months after Mr Odinga, the leader of the National Super Alliance, took the oath in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi and declared himself as ‘the people’s president’.

The two leaders last week promised Kenyans that they will begin a process of reconciliation following all their contentions.

They shortly before the arrival of US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Kenya.

“We were all surprised that Uhuru is calling Raila as my brother, last year it was not brother,” said Rt. Bishop Enock Tombe.

“It seem like if outsiders give these leaders time to reflect on what they are doing whether in the opposition or in the government probably they may come to their senses.”

Bishop Enock Tombe added that there is manipulation of the youth aggravated by the high rates of illiteracy in South Sudan, which he says is minimal in Kenya.

He urged all leaders to think beyond their families, communities and ethnic groups for the sake of the country and its people.

“If your people are suffering regardless of whether you were elected or you came by force, if your people whom you claim to lead are suffering, I think you should be compassionate.”