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Posts published in “Bangladesh”

Afghanistan: R2P Monitor, Issue 44 (15 March 2019)

Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab R...

World: Weekly Epidemiological Record (WER), 15 March 2019, vol. 94, no. 11 (pp. 129–140) [EN/FR]

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Bangladesh, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Fiji, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Liberia, Malawi, Niger, Nigeria, South Sudan, World, Zimbabwe

Contents

129 Strengthening governance, partnerships and transparency to secure global health: the International Coordinating Group on Vaccine Provision and its impact in 2018

Sommaire

129 Renforcer la gouvernance, les partenariats et la transparence afin de préserver la santé mondiale: le Groupe international de coordination pour l’approvisionnement en vaccins et ses résultats en 2018

World: Logistics Cluster: Global Overview – February 2019

Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

World: Aid workers killed, kidnapped and arrested (KKA) 2018

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

Based on incidents where aid workers1 were reportedly killed, kidnapped or arrested (KKA), identified through open ...

World: 5 reasons to support women during emergencies

Source: Medair
Country: Bangladesh, Jordan, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

On International Women’s Day, Medair’s International Programmes Director, Anne Reitsema, offers her thoughts on the unique challenges facing women in times o...

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 1, March 2019

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

COUNTRIES REQUIRING EXTERNAL ASSISTANCE FOR FOOD

FAO assesses that globally 41 countries, of which 31 are in Africa, continue to be in need of external assistance for food.
Conflict remains the main driver of high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather‑induced production declines and economic instability have also adversely impacted on food availability and access.

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA

Mostly reflecting beneficial weather conditions, production upturns were estimated in East, West and North Africa in 2018, while rainfall deficits cut outputs in Southern Africa. Continued poor rains have also affected the development of the 2019 crops in parts of Southern Africa, while conflicts in several other countries continue to curtail production prospects this year.

ASIA

Cereal production in 2018 in Far East Asia is estimated at a record high.
By contrast, outputs fell in the Near East and CIS Asia on account of rainfall deficits and the impact of conflicts in parts of the Near East. Production prospects for the soon‑to‑be harvested 2019 wheat crop are generally favourable across the region.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Cereal production is expected to increase in South America in 2019, recovering from last year’s reduced output. In Central America and the Caribbean, despite localized dry weather conditions, cereal outputs in 2018 were close to the average. The 2019 wheat crop in Mexico is likely to remain below average.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals [EN/AR/FR]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: Stop à la guerre contre les enfants (Résumé)

Source: Save the Children
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

RÉSUMÉ

« Chaque guerre est une guerre menée contre des enfants. »

Ces paroles prononcées il y a un siècle par Eglantyne Jebb, fondatrice de Save the Children, n'ont jamais résonné aussi fort. À l'heure où nous rédigeons ce rapport, des millions d'enfants à travers le monde sont pris au piège de conflits dont ils ne sont pas responsables. Leurs droits sont souvent bafoués en toute impunité.

Les nouvelles données présentées par Save the Children sont accablantes :

• 420 millions d'enfants (soit près d'un cinquième des enfants dans le monde) vivent dans une zone de conflit, contre près de 30 millions en 2016.

• Le nombre d'enfants vivant dans des zones de conflit a été multiplié par deux depuis la fin de la guerre froide.

• 142 millions d'enfants vivent dans des zones en proie à de violents conflits, où les affrontements font plus de 1 000 victimes par an.

• Une nouvelle analyse réalisée par Save the Children montre que le nombre de « graves violations » des droits des enfants en temps de conflit, rapporté et vérifié par les Nations Unies, a quasiment triplé depuis 2010.

• Des centaines de milliers d'enfants meurent chaque jour, victimes des effets indirects des conflits (malnutrition, maladies et absence de soins médicaux, eau et assainissement, etc.).

La protection des enfants frappés par les conflits, qui va de pair avec la concrétisation des promesses faites dans les déclarations, conventions et textes de loi du XXe siècle, constitue l'un des défis majeurs du XXIe siècle.
On assiste à une évolution de la nature des conflits et de leurs effets sur les enfants, avec de plus en plus de conflits intérieurs et d'acteurs armés. Des campagnes de violence sont menées délibérément à l'encontre de civils ; des écoles sont prises pour cible, des filles sont enlevées et réduites à l'esclavage et les populations sont volontairement affamées.

Les conflits armés durent plus longtemps ; à titre d'exemple, la guerre en Syrie (le conflit le plus important de ces dernières années) a déjà duré plus longtemps que la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Plus un conflit perdure, plus les dommages indirects sont conséquents, car les services essentiels cessent de fonctionner. Dans bon nombre de situations qui s'éternisent, la frontière entre « conflit » et « paix » est devenue floue.

Les conflits se déplacent également de plus en plus vers les zones urbaines ; à Mossoul et à Mogadiscio, par exemple, les enfants, ainsi que leurs maisons et leurs écoles, sont en première ligne, exposés à des attaques perpétrées au hasard. Dans les conflits armés d'aujourd'hui, bien souvent, il n'existe plus de champ de bataille clairement délimité : ce sont les maisons et les écoles qui sont maintenant devenues les terrains d'affrontement.

Les enfants en première ligne

Les enfants sont de plus en plus souvent les principales victimes des violences armées et des guerres. Les souffrances qu'ils endurent en temps de conflit sont différentes de celles des adultes, du fait notamment de leur plus grande faiblesse physique, mais aussi parce qu'ils ont tellement à perdre : leur développement physique, mental et psychosocial dépend en grande partie des conditions de vie de leur enfance.

Les différents effets des conflits sur les enfants dépendent d'un certain nombre de caractéristiques personnelles : principalement leur sexe et leur âge, mais aussi un éventuel handicap, leur origine ethnique, leur religion et leur vie en zone rurale ou urbaine. Les préjudices infligés aux enfants durant les conflits armés sont souvent plus graves que ceux que subissent les adultes et ont des implications à plus long terme, aussi bien pour les enfants euxmêmes que pour leurs sociétés.

Les enfants souffrent des conflits pour trois grandes raisons :

Ils peuvent être délibérément pris pour cible.
Ordonner des atrocités contre des enfants est un moyen extrêmement puissant de terroriser une population ; c'est donc une tactique militaire très prisée par les forces et les groupes armés dans bon nombre des conflits aujourd'hui. Les enfants sont aussi souvent visés parce qu'ils sont faciles à manipuler et à exploiter, par exemple en tant que soldats ou kamikazes. Les écoles deviennent des cibles pour des raisons tactiques : elles se transforment en terrain de recrutement ou sont utilisées à des fins militaires.

Les enfants sont victimes d'actions militaires disproportionnées ou menées au hasard.
Ils peuvent par exemple être tués ou blessés par des mines terrestres ou par l'utilisation d'armes explosives causant de vastes dégâts dans les zones peuplées.

Les enfants souffrent énormément des conséquences indirectes des conflits.
Celles-ci incluent les déplacements, l'effondrement des marchés et des services publics essentiels, comme les soins de santé, l'eau et l'assainissement, ou encore une insécurité généralisée. Bien que les effets indirects et les violations directes fassent tous deux partie du même ensemble de préjudices infligés aux enfants par les conflits modernes, ces conséquences indirectes des conflits touchent et tuent bien plus d'enfants. Sans compter tous les autres enfants privés d'école, qui voient s'envoler leurs chances d'un avenir meilleur.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

World: A Call to Action: Transforming the Global Refugee System

Source: Refugee Council
Country: Bangladesh, Colombia, Germany, Guatemala, Libya, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World, Yemen

World Refugee Council Calls for Major Actions to Transform the Global Refugee System

January 24, 2019...

World: Commission Implementing Decision of 11.1.2019 on the financing of humanitarian aid actions from the 2019 general budget of the European Union – ECHO/WWD/BUD/2019/01000

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

Having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, amending Regulations (EU) No 1296/2013, (EU) No 1301/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU)
No 1304/2013, (EU) No 1309/2013, (EU) No 1316/2013, (EU) No 223/2014, (EU) No 283/2014, and Decision No 541/2014/EU and repealing Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/20121 , and in particular Article 110 thereof,

Having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 1257/96 of 20 June 1996 concerning humanitarian aid2 ('the Humanitarian Aid Regulation' or 'HAR'), and in particular Article 1,

Article 2, Article 4 and Article 15(2) and (3) thereof,

Having regard to Council Decision 2013/755/EU of 25 November 2013 on the association of the overseas countries and territories with the European Union ('the Overseas Association Decision')3 , and in particular Article 79 thereof,

Whereas:

(1) In order to ensure the implementation of the humanitarian aid actions of the Union for 2019, it is necessary to adopt an annual financing decision for 2019. Article 110 of Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 (‘the Financial Regulation’) establishes detailed rules on financing decisions.

(2) The human and economic losses caused by natural disasters are devastating. These natural disasters, be they sudden or slow onset, that entail major loss of life, physical and psychological or social suffering or material damage, are constantly increasing, and with them so is the number of victims. Man-made humanitarian crises, resulting from wars or outbreaks of fighting (also called complex or protracted crises) account for a large proportion of, and are, the main source of humanitarian needs in the world.
There is also a need for international support for preparedness activities. Disaster preparedness aims at reducing the impact of disasters and crises on populations, allowing early warning and early action to better assist those affected.

(3) The humanitarian aid funded under this Decision should also cover essential activities and support services to humanitarian organisations as referred to in Articles 2(c) and 4 HAR, including notably the protection of humanitarian goods and personnel.

(4) The Union became party to the Food Assistance Convention on 28 November 2012; the Convention entered into force on 1 January 2013. In accordance with Article 5 of the Convention, an amount of EUR 350 000 000, to be spent as food and nutrition assistance funded under this Decision, is to be counted towards the minimum annual commitment for the year 2019 of the Union under the Food Assistance Convention.

(5) Although as a general rule grants funded by this Decision should be co-financed, by way of derogation, the Authorising Officer in accordance with Article 190(3) of the Financial Regulation, may agree to their full financing.

(6) The envisaged assistance is to comply with the conditions and procedures set out by the restrictive measures adopted pursuant to Article 215 TFEU. The needs-based and impartial nature of humanitarian aid implies that the Union may be called to finance humanitarian assistance in crises and countries covered by Union restrictive measures.
In such situations, and in keeping with the relevant principles of international law and with the principles of impartiality, neutrality and non-discrimination referred to in Article 214(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the Union should allow and facilitate rapid and unimpeded access to humanitarian relief by civilians in need. The relevant Union restrictive measures should therefore be interpreted and implemented in such a manner as not to preclude the delivery of humanitarian assistance to the intended beneficiaries.

(7) The Commission may acknowledge and accept contributions from other donors in accordance with Article 21(2)(b) of the Financial Regulation, subject to the signing of the relevant agreement. Where such contributions are not denominated in euro, a reasonable estimate of conversion should be made.

(8) It is advisable to maintain a part of the Union budget for humanitarian aid unallocated in order to cover unforeseen operations, as part of an operational reserve.

(9) In cases where Union funding is granted to non-governmental organisations in accordance with Article 7 HAR, in order to guarantee that the beneficiaries of that funding are able to meet their commitments in the long term, the Authorising Officer responsible should verify if the non-governmental organisations concerned satisfy the requisite eligibility and selection criteria, notably as regards their legal, operational and financial capacity. The verification to be made should also seek to confirm whether the non-governmental organisations concerned are able to provide humanitarian aid in accordance with the humanitarian principles set out in the European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid4 .

(10) In cases where the Union finances humanitarian aid operations of Member States' specialised agencies in accordance with Article 9 HAR, in order to guarantee that the beneficiaries of Union grants are capable of fulfilling their commitments in the long run, the Authorising Officer responsible should verify the legal, operational and, where the entities or bodies concerned are governed by private law, financial capacity of any Member States' specialised agencies desiring to receive financial support under this Decision. The verification to be made should notably seek to confirm whether the Member States' specialised agencies concerned are able to provide humanitarian assistance or equivalent international relief outside the Union in accordance with the humanitarian principles set out in the European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid.

(11) Pursuant to Article 195(a) Financial Regulation, it is appropriate to authorise the award of grants without a call for proposals to the non-governmental organisations satisfying the eligibility and suitability criteria referred to in Article 7 HAR for the purpose of humanitarian aid.

(12) In order to ensure an effective delivery in the field of Union-funded humanitarian aid in all relevant crisis contexts while taking into account the specific mandates of international organisations, such as the United Nations and the international component of the Red Cross and Red Crescent movement (International Committee of the Red Cross and International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies), it is necessary to use indirect management for the implementation of Union-funded humanitarian aid operations.

(13) The Commission is to ensure a level of protection of the financial interests of the Union with regards to entities and persons entrusted with the implementation of Union funds by indirect management as provided for in Article 154(3) of the Financial Regulation. To this end, such entities and persons are to be subject to an assessment of their systems and procedures in accordance with Article 154(4) of the Financial Regulationand, if necessary, to appropriate supervisory measures in accordance with Article 154(5) of the Financial Regulation before a contribution agreement can be signed.

(14) It is necessary to allow for the payment of interest due for late payment on the basis of Article 116(5) Financial Regulation.

(15) It is appropriate to reserve appropriations for a trust fund in accordance with Article 234 Financial Regulation in order to strengthen the international role of the Union in external actions and development and to increase its visibility and efficiency.

(16) In order to allow for flexibility in the implementation of the financing decision, it is appropriate to define the term 'substantial change' within the meaning of Article 110(5) of the Financial Regulation.

(17) The measures provided for in this Decision are in accordance with the opinion of the Humanitarian Aid Committee established by Article 17(1) HAR.

World: Stop the War on Children: Protecting Children in 21st Century Conflict

Source: Save the Children
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

At least 100,000 babies die every year because of conflict

More children are living in areas affected by armed conflict than at any time over the past two decades, a new report from Save the Children reveals

At least 550,000 babies are thought to have died as a result of armed conflict between 2013 and 2017 in the 10 worst-affected countries, according to new analysis by Save the Children — an average of well over 100,000 every year.

The infants succumbed to indirect effects of conflict and war such as hunger, damaged infrastructure and hospitals, a lack of access to health care and sanitation, and the denial of aid. They probably would not have died if they hadn’t been living in areas affected by conflict, Save the Children says.

The total deaths from indirect effects jump to 870,000 when all children under the age of five are included. While imperfect, the estimates may be conservative, according the charity. By comparison, Save the Children has estimated from available data that in the same five-year period almost 175,000 fighters were killed in the conflicts.

The numbers of indirect child deaths are published in a Save the Children report, Stop the War on Children, launched ahead of today’s opening of the Munich Security Conference. For the second year in a row, the report includes the most comprehensive collection of data on the number of children living in conflict-affected areas. It reveals that more children — almost 1 in 5 — are living in areas affected by armed conflict and war than at any time in more than 20 years.

New research by the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), commissioned by Save the Children, found that 420 million children were living in conflict-affected areas in 2017 (18% of all children worldwide) — up 30 million from the previous year. Afghanistan, Yemen, South Sudan, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Syria, Iraq, Mali, Nigeria and Somalia are the countries where children were hardest hit by conflict in 2017.

Helle Thorning-Schmidt, CEO of Save the Children International, said:

“Our report shows that the way today’s wars are being fought is causing more suffering for children. Almost 1 in 5 children are living in areas impacted by conflict – more than at any time in the past two decades. The number of children being killed or maimed has more than tripled, and we are seeing an alarming increase in the use of aid as a weapon of war.

“It is shocking that in the 21st century we are going backwards on principles and moral standards that are so simple – children and civilians should never be targeted.

Our analysis clearly shows the situation is getting worse for children and the world is allowing this travesty to happen. Every day, children come under attack because armed groups and military forces disregard international laws and treaties. From the use of chemical weapons to rape as a weapon of war, war crimes are being committed with impunity.”

Part of the reason for the increased number of children living in conflict-affected areas is that today’s conflicts are more likely to be protracted, urban and fought among civilian populations. Increasingly, international rules and norms are flouted.

The Stop the War on Children report includes a breakdown of UN data on verified grave violations against children. According to these figures, grave violations rose worldwide from just under 10,000 in 2010 to more than 25,000 in 2017—the highest number on record. Every day children face the threat of being killed or maimed, recruited by armed groups, abducted, falling victim to sexual violence, seeing their school attacked or humanitarian aid denied. In many cases, children are specifically targeted.

Masika*, 15, from the DRC, is the youngest of seven children whose father died and left them unable to support themselves. She left school and joined an armed group to survive. “Everything I had thought I could do and could be one day now seemed impossible. I thought my only option was to get involved with armed groups. [The soldiers] wouldn't stop asking me to satisfy their sexual urges and I found myself having to give in.”

Save the Children’s report also highlights how efforts to keep schools safe, avoid the use of certain weapons, seek accountability for crimes against children or pursue new ways to support their recovery from the horrors of conflict can make a huge difference in their lives.

The charity included more than 20 recommendations for governments and other influential organisations to ensure children are protected during war and conflict. The commitments range from signing a Safe Schools Declaration and a minimum age of 18 for military recruitment to the avoidance of using explosive weapons in populated areas and tightening conditions for arms sales.

Ms Thorning-Schmidt continued: “When the rules of war are broken, the international community must be clear that this will not be tolerated and hold perpetrators to account. And for the children whose lives are wrecked by conflict, we must do all we can to protect them from further harm and help rebuild their future.”

Save the Children is also calling for an independent body to investigate and analyse all violations of international humanitarian law and of human rights, notably children’s rights.

World: FAO in the 2019 humanitarian appeals

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia

The number of people facing severe hunger in the world has been steadily rising and remains deeply of concern.

Conflict and extreme climate events remain the main drivers behind severe food crises. Often occurring simultaneously, all dimensions of food security – food availability, access and utilization – are further undermined.

Climate-related shocks and insecurity continue to force a significant number of people to abandon their homes, disrupting their livelihoods, reducing access to income-generating opportunities and putting pressure on limited resources, particularly affecting the food security of displaced populations and host communities. Prolonged drought conditions resulted in consecutive poor harvests in countries already facing high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition. Compounding the situation is a high probability of an El Niño event developing by the beginning of 2019. El Niño hazards – usually associated with heavy rains, floods and drought – are expected to further aggravate the food insecurity and coping capacities of vulnerable populations.

Agriculture – the main source of livelihood for the majority of crisis-affected populations – plays a crucial role in fighting hunger. Investing in agricultural support from the onset of a crisis saves lives and enables families trapped by fighting or living in remote areas to rapidly resume local food production and earn an income.

In 2019, FAO’s response will continue to be scaled up to meet the most urgent needs of affected communities while strengthening their resilience and adaptive capacities. This will help to address the root causes of increased food insecurity and malnutrition, particularly of those most vulnerable.

World: Mapping SUN Movement Networks in 17 fragile and conflict-affected states: A snap shot of developments and progress

Source: Emergency Nutrition Network
Country: Bangladesh, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

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