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World: CrisisWatch July 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Rwanda, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

In July, Libya’s war spread beyond Tripoli, and Iran and the U.S. continued to teeter on the precipice of military confrontation. Nigeria’s woes deepened as Boko Haram stepped up attacks in the north east, tensions rose between herders and farmers, and the government cracked down on Shiite Muslim protesters in the capital Abuja. In Somalia, Al-Shabaab ramped up attacks in the capital Mogadishu and across the south, and thousands took to the streets in Malawi to protest President Mutharika’s re-election and alleged electoral fraud. In Europe, tensions rose between Kosovo and Serbia with a senior Serbian official claiming Kosovo had denied him entry. On a positive note, the peace process in Afghanistan saw signs of progress, which could lead to the finalisation of a U.S.-Taliban agreement in August.

The war in Libya expanded. Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar’s military alliance pursued its campaign to take the capital Tripoli from forces nominally loyal to the UN-backed government based there. For the first time since hostilities erupted in April, government forces struck outside the Tripoli area, deploying drones to destroy enemy assets in Jufra and Waddan in central Libya. Haftar’s forces retaliated by striking the air base in Misrata, some 200km east of Tripoli, from where the drones launched. To end this destructive stalemate, international actors should press both sides to reconsider their uncompromising positions and accept an internationally-monitored ceasefire, followed by talks for new political, military and financial arrangements under a UN aegis.

Tensions continued to run high between Iran and the U.S., keeping them on the brink of military confrontation. Once sparked, such a conflict could spread rapidly across regional flashpoints and engulf their respective allies. In July, Iran breached limits on uranium enrichment agreed in the 2015 nuclear deal, and said it would accelerate its violations if the deal’s remaining parties did not by 6 September find ways to protect it from U.S. sanctions. Maritime confrontations continued, especially in the Strait of Hormuz. In a new report, Averting the Middle East’s 1914 Moment, we warn that in the absence of direct talks between the two sides, a small incident could blow up into a regional conflict. We urge third parties to intensify efforts to defuse the crisis, salvage the nuclear accord and de-escalate tensions.

Nigeria faced greater insecurity on several fronts. Ten years after Boko Haram’s founding father, Muhammad Yusuf, was killed in police custody, the radical insurgent group seemed to be on the offensive, stepping up attacks across Borno state and leaving scores dead, both civilians and security forces. In a recent report, we explain how one of its two factions, Islamic State in West Africa Province, is gaining influence by cultivating support among locals. The authorities will struggle to end the insurgency without a political strategy to supplement their military campaign, one focused on improving governance and services and ensuring that security forces are held accountable. Meanwhile, in the centre and south, herder-farmer tensions rose, partly over the government’s initiative to create temporary settlements for Fulani herders. And in the capital Abuja, security forces violently dispersed protests demanding the release of Sheikh Ibrahim el-Zakzaky, leader of the Islamic Movement of Nigeria. The government officially labelled the group a “terrorist organisation” and banned it.

In Somalia, the Islamist insurgent group Al-Shabaab increased attacks on civilians as well as Somali and international forces, killing at least 109. In the capital Mogadishu, a female suicide-bomber detonated her explosives in the mayor’s office, killing six people and injuring others including the mayor, who later also died. Al-Shabaab said the attack’s target was U.S. diplomat James Swan, recently appointed UN envoy to Somalia, who had left the building not long before. The counter-insurgency remains hampered by bitter feuding between the federal government and federal states over power and resources. In Malawi, protests against President Mutharika’s 21 May re-election picked up steam, and in places opposition activists clashed with ruling party supporters. Opposition parties and civil society groups claim the election was rigged and demand the election commission chair resign.

In Europe, tensions rose between Kosovo and Serbia. A Kosovar foreign ministry advisor on 4 July announced a ban on Serbian officials entering Kosovo, which a government spokesperson denied the next day. Despite this, Serbia’s defence minister said he was prevented from entering the country on 10 July, calling Kosovo’s leaders “liars”.

As violence in Afghanistan continued to take a heavy civilian toll, the latest round of U.S.-Taliban talks bore fruit on four critical issues: countering transnational jihadists, U.S. troop withdrawal, intra-Afghan dialogue, and a permanent and comprehensive ceasefire. This progress could augur the finalisation of an agreement in August. Moreover, for the first time Taliban and Afghan government officials met, albeit informally, to discuss a roadmap toward intra-Afghan dialogue. While these discussions constitute a step forward, whether and how this ice-breaker event evolves into substantive negotiations on difficult issues, including the state’s structure and power sharing, remains to be seen.

World: Islamic Relief Worldwide 2018: Annual Report & Financial Statements

Source: Islamic Relief
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Ethiopia, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Malawi, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Russian Federatio...

World: To Walk the Earth in Safety (2019): January – December 2018, 18th Edition – Documenting the United States’ Commitment to Conventional Weapons Destruction

Source: US Department of State
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Estonia, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Palau, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

A Message From Deputy Assistant Secretary Marik String

This 18th Edition of To Walk the Earth In Safety summarizes the United States’ Conventional Weapons Destruction (CWD) programs in 2018. CWD assistance provides the United States with a powerful and flexible tool to help partner countries manage their stockpiles of munitions, destroy excess small arms and light weapons (SA/LW) and clear explosive hazards such as landmines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Our assistance also helps countries destroy illicitly-held or poorlysecured man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS) and mitigate their threat to civilian aviation and public safety.

In today’s dynamic world, threats to U.S. national security abound. The work carried out by the Department of State’s Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (PM/ WRA) through its CWD programs is essential to protecting civilians and advancing our nation’s interests. From my work as a Reserve Naval Officer and as a staff member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, I understand the need for a robust effort to secure weapons so they do not fall into the hands of nefarious actors.

Stockpiles of excess, poorly-secured, or otherwise at-risk conventional weapons remain a serious challenge to peace and prosperity in many countries. Poorly-secured munitions are illicitly diverted to terrorists and other destabilizing actors. Explosive hazards continue to kill and maim people long after conflicts have ended, preventing the safe return of displaced people and suppressing economic opportunities that are crucial to prosperity and political stability. As long as these dangers persist, it is difficult for communities to recover from conflict.

Since late 2015, the United States and our partners in the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS have cleared IEDs from critical infrastructure in Iraq and Syria including hospitals, schools, and water pumping stations, facilitating the flow of hundreds of millions of dollars in stabilization assistance and humanitarian aid into liberated areas. In this regard, explosive hazard clearance serves as an essential enabler for follow-on stabilization and humanitarian assistance. CWD programs such as this lay the foundation for long-term benefits. U.S. humanitarian demining assistance to Vietnam began in 1993 and helped set the stage for our current bilateral relationship. In the near term, across Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia, CWD programs focused on excess and poorly-secured weapons have helped keep those weapons out of the hands of criminals and terrorists.

Since 1993, the United States has provided more than $3.4 billion in CWD assistance to over 100 countries. In 2018, we had active CWD programs in 59 countries. These programs are implemented by commercial contractors, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations.

United States CWD programs are tied to key U.S. foreign policy priorities and play a direct role in keeping U.S. citizens and our allies safe, while also clearing the way for a stable, secure, and prosperous future in countries that are key to U.S. security interests. Thanks to the U.S. Congress’ bipartisan support and generosity of the American people, we can attest that our goal remains a future in which all may walk the earth in safety.

MARIK STRING
Deputy Assistant Secretary
Political-Military Affairs

World: Protection in Danger Monthly News Brief – June 2019

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Greece, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, World

Africa

Democratic Republic of the Congo

30 June 2019: In Bukavu city, South Kivu province, a fire of unspecified origin at Zaire IDP Camp destroyed more than 200 houses, leaving 1,800 people without shelter. Source: ACAPS

Eritrea

Throughout June 2019: The Eritrean Government continued to deny the Human Rights Council’s Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Eritrea access into the country. Source: Africa News

Kenya

28 June 2019 (DOA): In Dadaab town, Garissa county, refugees of the Dadaab Refugee Camp have accused staff of UNHCR and partner NGOs of demanding bribes from them for their repatriation to Somalia and other services. Source: The Guardian

South Sudan

02 June 2019: In Bor, Jonglei state, a female INGO aid worker was reportedly assaulted by a male national staff member at the Bor PoC site, requiring medical treatment. Reports suggest the incidents occurred because the female staff refused demands to medically treat the male colleague's wife. The male aid worker was arrested by UNPOL. Source: AWSD

Sudan

7-9 June 2019: In Bora and Habor areas, North Darfur, paramilitary groups reportedly attacked multiple farms, injuring two female IDPs who were taking shelter in the farms. Source: Radio Dabanga

17 June 2019: In Bandi village, suspected Boko Haram militants killed two IDPs. No further information specified. Source: ACLED

June (Unspecified date): In Omdurman, nine South Sudanese refugees were reported to have been killed over an indeterminant number of days. Additionally, there were reports of multiple rapes, seven injuries, and two missing persons. The identity of the perpetrators remains unclear, although reports suggest the Sudanese military may have been responsible. Source: Liveuamap

Libya: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, July 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Colombia, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, occupied Palestinian territory, Peru, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Yemen

Overview

Peru has the presidency in July. It is planning a briefing under the agenda item “peacebuilding and sustaining peace” focused on strengthening partnerships for nationally owned transitions. Peru’s Foreign Minister Néstor Popolizio is expected to chair the session. In addition, Peru plans to hold an open debate on the link between terrorism and organised crime and a debate on strengthening cooperation between the Council, the Secretariat and the troop- and police-contributing countries in peacekeeping operations. There will also be a briefing on implementing the “youth, peace and security” agenda.

There will be an annual debate on the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals, which was established in 2010 to carry out the remaining essential functions of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia after their respective closures.

A visiting mission to Colombia is planned for the middle of the month, with a briefing and consultations by the head of the UN Verification Mission in Colombia on the Secretary-General’s 90-day report scheduled for later in the month.

There will be consultations on Haiti on the 90-day report and the transition of MINUJUSTH to the United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti (BINUH), a special political mission that will start on 16 October.

Regarding Europe, the mandate of the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus will be renewed this month, ahead of which there will be a TCC meeting and consultations. There may also be a briefing on Ukraine.

African issues that will be considered this month are:

• Democratic Republic of the Congo, an update on MONUSCO; and

• Libya, an update on UNSMIL and the 1970 Libya Sanctions Committee.
Regarding Middle East issues, an update on Yemen on the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement (UNMHA) is anticipated in July.

The Council is also expected to renew the mandate of UNMHA, which expires on 16 July.
Other Middle East issues this month include:

• Israel/Palestine, the quarterly open debate on the Middle East;

• Lebanon, an update on the implementation of resolution 1701, which called for a cessation of hostilities between the Shi’a militant group Hezbollah and Israel in 2006; and • Syria, the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weapons.

Regarding UN regional offices, there will be updates on UNRCCA in Central Asia and UNOWAS in West Africa.

The Council will be watching developments in Iran, Myanmar and Sudan.

World: World Bank Group Support in Situations Involving Conflict-Induced Displacement – An Independent Evaluation

Source: World Bank
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the Republic of North Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zambia

Highlights

  • In 2016, the World Bank Group stepped up its engagement in situations of conflictinduced forced displacement at the global and country levels and adopted a new approach to its engagement that recognizes displacement as a development challenge that must be addressed to attain the World Bank Group’s twin goals.

  • Since fiscal year 2016, the Bank Group’s analytical, financial, and operational support has become more aligned with its stated development approach building on lessons from past engagements. This is an important shift.

  • Advisory services and analytics have shifted from providing a rationale for Bank Group engagement in situations involving conflictinduced forced displacement to contextspecific needs assessments focused on evidence-based, medium-term solutions.
    The World Bank successfully mobilized new financing to support situations involving conflict-induced forced displacement and crowded-in funding from other donors. World Bank support for populations forcibly displaced by conflict and their host communities has increased, become more balanced, and focused on priority sectors to
    generate economic opportunities. These are significant achievements.

  • At the same time, the Bank Group has not yet fully leveraged its comparative
    advantages in implementing its development approach. Evidence generated
    from analytical and advisory services needs to be translated better into
    context-specific policy dialogue, project design, and programming.
    Project design, in particular, could further address the specific needs and
    vulnerabilities of conflict-induced forcibly displaced persons and their host
    communities, especially the specific needs and vulnerabilities of the women
    and children among them. Projects should also more systematically include
    specific indicators to monitor and evaluate the effects on affected populations.

  • The World Bank engages and coordinates with humanitarian actors and
    development organizations at various levels, but coordination could be further
    strengthened. Additionally, select partnerships at the country level could be
    leveraged to ensure sector coherence and to foster policy dialogue to enact
    institutional reforms toward self-reliance that address the vulnerabilities of
    forcibly displaced persons. The Bank Group could also increase engagement
    to catalyze the private sector’s role in situations of conflict-induced forced
    displacement.

  • Internal and external factors inhibit the Bank Group’s development
    response to address situations of conflict-induced forced displacement.
    Internal factors include varying levels of active leadership in Country
    Management Units, growing but still limited Bank Group experience, and
    incentives. External factors include the varying nature of displacement
    situations, government capacity, macroeconomic and development
    challenges, and complex political economy factors.

Yemen: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, June 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Yemen

Overview

Kuwait will hold the presidency in June. Three high-level briefings are planned: on protection of civilians and missing persons in armed conflict, on conflict prevention and mediation, and on regional cooperation. All three briefings will be chaired by Kuwaiti Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Sheikh Sabah Khaled Al-Hamad Al-Sabah. OCHA Under-Secretary-General Mark Lowcock and a representative from the ICRC are expected to brief at the “missing persons in conflict” meeting. Secretary-General António Guterres; Mary Robinson, the chair of the Elders; and Ban Ki-moon, a deputy chair of the Elders, are the anticipated briefers for the conflict prevention and mediation briefing.
Guterres and the League of Arab States (LAS)
Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul-Gheit may brief during the third of the meetings, on cooperation between the UN and the League of Arab States.

Kuwait, the chair of the Working Group on Documentation and Other Procedural Questions, is also planning to hold an open debate on working methods.

Adoptions are scheduled to renew the Democratic Republic of the Congo sanctions and the authorisation for member states to inspect vessels on the high seas off the coast of Libya. A further three adoptions are scheduled to renew the mandates of the missions in Darfur (UNAMID), the Golan Heights (UNDOF) and Mali (MINUSMA). Ahead of the adoptions there will be consultations on UNDOF, and briefing and consultations on UNAMID and MINUSMA as well as TCC meetings on all three missions.

Meetings on other African issues this month include:

• Central African Republic, on the activities of MINUSCA;

• Somalia, a briefing by the chair of the 751 Somalia Sanctions Committee;

• South Sudan, on the activities of UNMISS;

• Sudan, the semi-annual briefing by the ICC prosecutor and the quarterly briefing by the chair of the 1591 Sudan Sanctions Committee; and

• UNOCA/LRA, an update on the activities of UNOCA (Central Africa) and the regional strategy to combat the Lord’s Resistant Army.

In addition to the monthly meeting on the situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question, other Middle East issues that will be considered include:

• Syria, the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process, and the use of chemical weapons;

• Iran, the implementation of resolution 2231, which endorsed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action on Iran’s nuclear programme; and

• Yemen, an update on the implementation of resolution 2452, which established the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement.

The annual briefing by force commanders will be by commanders of peacekeeping missions in Cyprus (UNFICYP) and Darfur (UNAMID).

In June, the Council will have the second of three briefings on the situation in Kosovo scheduled this year.

Regarding Asian issues there will be the regular debate on Afghanistan.

There may be a Council visiting mission during the month.

Finally, the General Assembly is scheduled to elect five non-permanent Security Council members on 7 June. Six member states— Estonia, Niger, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Tunisia and Viet Nam—are running for the five available seats. Estonia and Romania are contesting the single Eastern European Group seat, while the other four candidates will run unopposed.

World: Press Conference by Security Council President on Programme of Work for May (1 May 2019)

Source: UN Security Council
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

The Security Council’s programme of work for May will feature two open debates, the first on peacekeeping and the other on protection of civilians in armed conflict, Dian Triansyah Djani (Indonesia), Council President for the month, said at a Headquarters press conference today.

Outlining the priorities for his country’s month-long presidency, he said: “The goal is to achieve more interaction.” The open debate on peacekeeping, to be held on 7 May, will examine questions about training and building capacity. “This is an important issue,” he emphasized, pointing out that Indonesia is currently the largest peacekeeper on the Council, with 3,000 personnel involved in eight missions. The country intends to increase the number of its female peacekeepers, he added.

He went on to state that the open debate — to be chaired by Indonesia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs — will broadly focus on enhancing peacekeeping missions. It will feature remarks by the Secretary-General and a briefing by the Force Commander of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), offering a perspective on what is expected of peacekeepers.

The 23 May open debate on protection of civilians in armed conflict is timed to coincide with the seventieth anniversary of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, he said, adding that it will also commemorate 20 years since protection has been on the Council’s agenda. With the Foreign Minister presiding, it will include remarks by the Secretary-General, as well as briefings by the President of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and members of civil society.

More broadly, the Council will hold meetings on the situations in Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as Libya, he said, noting that it will consider the Group of Five for the Sahel (G-5 Sahel). It could hold a possible Arria formula meeting on 9 May focused on the issue of settlements in Palestine. On 21 May, the Council it will hear a joint briefing by the Chairs of its 1267, 1373 and 1540 sanctions committees, he said. Members will also discuss the situation in Yemen, mandate renewals for the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA), the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) and the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), as well as the sanctions imposed on South Sudan, which are set to expire.

Speaking in his national capacity, he said Indonesia will endeavour to conduct its Council presidency in a smooth manner, using its culture and diplomacy to find unity and consensus.

In response to questions, he said the Council has not received any request for a meeting on the situation in Venezuela.

Asked about the meeting on Libya, to be held on 8 May, he said the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court will brief members on that day.

Responding to a query about the 800,000 migrants in Libya, he said efforts are under way to invite Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), to brief the Council’s 10 May meeting on the latest developments. He added that he has not received any draft resolution on the matter, recalling that the Council recently held a meeting on the ceasefire and is following developments in the country.

Asked whether the Council will move to another format for its 8 May meeting on Bosnia and Herzegovina, he said the discussion will follow its usual format, but he is open to proposals.

In response to other questions, he said the Council has invited a professor from Ohio to brief the Arria formula meeting on Palestine, as have human rights lawyers. The interactive discussion will be the most important aspect of that meeting, he emphasized.

He concluded by saying there has been request for a meeting on the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

For the full programme of work, please see www.un.org/securitycouncil/events/calendar.

For information media. Not an official record.

Yemen: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, May 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Haiti, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

Overview

Indonesia will hold the presidency in May. An open debate on peacekeeping focused on better training to improve the safety and security and performance of UN peacekeepers is planned. Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi will chair the meeting. Secretary-General António Guterres; the force commander of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lieutenant General Elias Rodrigues Martins Filho; and the director of the secretariat of the International Forum for the Challenges of Peace Operations, Björn Holmberg, are expected to brief.

The other open debate in May is on protection of civilians in conflict with a focus on community engagement as a means of enhancing the protection of civilians.

There are several mandate renewals related to African issues: UNISFA in Abyei and AMISOM in Somalia, as well as for the 2206 South Sudan Sanctions Committee and its Panel of Experts.

Other African issues include:

  • Burundi, on the political situation;
  • Libya, briefings by the ICC Prosecutor, the chair of the 1970 Libya Sanctions Committee, and by the head of UNSMIL;
  • Somalia, a briefing on UNSOM; and
  • Sahel, a briefing on the activities of the joint force of the Group of Five for the Sahel.

A briefing and consultations on the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq is scheduled ahead of its mandate renewal. In addition, the following Middle East issues will be considered:

  • Lebanon, on the implementation of resolution 1559;
  • Syria, the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weapons; and
  • Yemen, an update on the implementation of resolution 2452, which established the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement.

Regarding Europe, Council members are expecting to discuss the Secretary-General’s report on the negotiations on Cyprus. There will also be the biannual debate on Bosnia and Herzegovina.

On Asia, the Council will be briefed in consultations on the work of the 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee.

The annual briefing by the chairs of the three counter-terrorism subsidiary bodies is also expected.

The Council may meet to discuss the transition of the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) as the Secretary-General is scheduled to submit details for a follow-up mission this month.

It is likely that there will be two Arria-formula meetings: on Palestine and on peacebuilding.

World: Conflict-related sexual violence: Report of the Secretary-General (S/2019/280)

Source: UN Security Council
Country: Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Central African Republic, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

I. Introduction

  1. The present report, which covers the period from January to December 2018, is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 2106 (2013), in which the Council requested me to report annually on the implementation of resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1960 (2010) and to recommend strategic actions.

  2. 2019 marks the 10-year anniversary of the establishment of the mandate and Office of my Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict. Over the past decade, there has been a paradigm shift in the understanding of the scourge of conflict-related sexual violence and its impact on international peace and security, the response required to prevent such crimes and the multidimensional services needed by survivors. While the United Nations increasingly addresses the problem of sexual violence in conflict from an operational or technical perspective through the strengthening of security and justice institutions, it remains essential to recognize and tackle gender inequality as the root cause and driver of sexual violence, including in times of war and peace.

  3. Structural gender inequalities and discrimination are at the heart of the differential impact conflict has on women, men, boys and girls. Preventing sexual violence requires the advancement of substantive gender equality before, during and after conflict, including by ensuring women’s full and effective participation in political, economic and social life and ensuring accessible and responsive justice and security institutions. The mandate of the Office of the Special Representative is firmly rooted within the women and peace and security agenda, with its origin in Security Council resolution 1325 (2000). It is significant, therefore, that in 2018 my Special Representative signed a framework of cooperation with the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. The Framework affirms the ways in which the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the response to conflict-related sexual violence and the broader discourse on women, peace and security and gender equality are linked.

World: Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration: Compendium of Projects 2010–2017

Source: International Organization for Migration
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Iraq, Liberia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Uganda, World

In the context of assisting in the transition and recovery of conflict affected societies and communities, IOM has supported disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programmes for ex-combatants/fighters and their communities of return, through more than 120 projects over the last 25 years. Primarily comprised of reintegration-related work, these projects have been spread across more than 30 countries, with particularly extensive work in Colombia and sub-Saharan Africa.

IOM's involvement in DDR derives from the Organization's commitment to the prevention and resolution of conflict as a principle driver of crisis induced displacement. DDR programming not only addresses the causes and consequences of conflict, as critical instigators of displacement, but helps create conditions for the progressive resolution of displacement situations and the prevention of future displacement.

This Compendium presents a selection of IOM's DDR portfolio between 2010 and 2017, embedded within a broader, theoretical framework. The document is structured in two parts. The first part outlines the theoretical context and the second presents IOM's DDR and DDR-related programmes between 2010 and 2017. These projects reflect the evolution of DDR, presented in three distinct 'generations' of work, which accordingly map to different contexts, project approaches and beneficiaries.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

World: To Walk the Earth in Safety (2018): Documenting the United States’ Commitment to Conventional Weapons Destruction

Source: US Department of State
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Georgia, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Micronesia (Federated States of), Montenegro, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Palau, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

"This 17th Edition of To Walk the Earth In Safety summarizes the United States' CWD programs in 2017. CWD assistance provides the United States with a powerful and flexible tool to help partner countries manage their stockpiles of munitions, destroy excess small arms and light weapons (SA/LW) and clear explosive hazards such as landmines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and UXO. Our assistance also helps countries destroy or enhance security of their man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS) and their threat to civilian aviation, in addition to other weapons and munitions. ... Thanks to the U.S. Congress’ bipartisan support and support of the American people, we can attest that our goal remains one where all may walk the earth in safety." -- Message From Under Secretary Andrea Thompson

World: Preventive Priorities Survey: 2019

Source: Council on Foreign Relations
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Croatia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Iraq, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

U.S. foreign policy experts assess the likelihood and impact of thirty potential crises or conflicts around the world in the coming year in CFR’s annual survey.

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Each year since 2008, the Council on Foreign Relations’ Center for Preventive Action (CPA) has asked foreign policy experts to rank thirty ongoing or potential conflicts based on their likelihood of occurring or escalating in the next year and their potential impact on U.S. national interests.

“The annual Preventive Priorities Survey is unique in providing a regular, forward-looking assessment of conflict and instability around the world in a way that helps policymakers focus attention on the most important risks,” explains Paul B. Stares, General John W. Vessey senior fellow for conflict prevention and CPA director.

Read more on Council on Foreign Relations.

World: Documenting the United States’ Commitment to Conventional Weapons Destruction: To Walk the Earth in Safety (January–December 2017)

Source: Government of the United States of America
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Colombia, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Georgia, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Libya, Lithuania, Marshall Islands, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Palau, Senegal, Serbia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Stockpiles of excess, poorly-secured, or otherwise at-risk conventional weapons continue to pose a challenge to peace and prosperity worldwide. In the wrong hands, SA/LW fuel political instability and violence, while more advanced conventional weapons, such as MANPADS, pose a serious threat to international security. Aging munitions stockpiles may also explode without warning, devastating nearby population centers. Meanwhile, landmines and ERW, including cluster munition remnants, artillery shells, and mortars, continue to kill and maim people even after conflicts end. Clearing land paves the way for stabilization assistance to move forward, allowing displaced persons to return home, economic revitalization to begin, and political stability to take root.

The U.S. Government’s Collaborative Approach

The United States is committed to reducing these threats worldwide and is the leading financial supporter of CWD, providing more than $3.2 billion in assistance to more than 100 countries since 1993. This makes the United States the world’s single largest financial supporter of CWD. The Department of State, Department of Defense, and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) work together with foreign governments, private companies, and international and nongovernmental organizations to reduce excess SA/LW and conventional munitions stockpiles (including MANPADS), implement physical security and stockpile management (PSSM) best practices at conventional weapons storage sites, and carry out humanitarian mine action programs.

The Department of State, through the Political-Military Affairs Bureau’s Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (PM/WRA), manages CWD assistance and oversees programs in 47 countries in 2017. It also leads the U.S. Interagency MANPADS Task Force, which coordinates counter-MANPADS efforts by the Departments of State, Defense, Homeland Security, and other relevant stakeholders, and helps partner nations eliminate or better secure their MANPADS. The Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Training Center (HDTC) trains deminers, ammunition handlers, and stockpile managers from partner countries. The Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development Program (HD R&D) improves CWD technologies, enhancing the efficiency and safety of humanitarian demining operations around the world. USAID assists mine and UXO survivors, providing medical and rehabilitative care, through its Leahy War Victims Fund.

Department of State Support for CWD

Through PM/WRA, the Department of State has managed more than 68 percent (over $2.2 billion) of the United States’ more than $3.2 billion contribution to CWD since 1993, with a three-fold objective:

  1. Enhance U.S. and international security by destroying and securing SA/LW, including MANPADS, at risk of proliferation to terrorists, insurgents, and other violent non-state actors;

  2. Remediate explosive remnants of war (ERW), returning land to safe and productive use; and 3. Accelerate achievement of U.S. foreign policy objectives by broadening support for CWD efforts.

PM/WRA partners with nongovernmental organizations, international organizations, educational institutions, and private sector contractors to implement its programs. Robust project performance standards, enhanced monitoring and evaluation strategies, and a comprehensive program planning process guide PM/WRA’s resource allocation decisions and hold implementing partners accountable.

The measurable, tangible results that flow from the U.S. government’s commitment to CWD programs strongly support U.S. foreign policy priorities. In addition, these programs help protect the lives and livelihoods of civilians so they can more safely remain in their own countries. We look forward to continuing this important work.

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