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Posts published in “Burkina Faso”

Mozambique: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 20: 13 – 19 May 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 19 May 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 71 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Cyclone Kenneth in Mozambique and Comoros
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Crimean Congo Haemorrhagic fever in Namibia - Humanitarian crisis in South Sudan.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • Three weeks after cyclone Kenneth made landfall in northern Mozambique and the Comoros Islands, the affected population continue to suffer from consequences of the cyclone, although the humanitarian conditions continue to improve. Damage caused to agriculture and livestock has contributed to a worsening of living conditions for affected populations, triggering malnutrition among children, due to food insecurity. Humanitarian access remains a challenge in affected areas, especially in Mozambique, with many areas remaining inaccessible by road and requiring access via air or river transport. Humanitarian agencies in Mozambique and Comoros have to continue to monitor and respond to health challenges – including the spread of vector-borne and water-borne diseases in affected areas.

  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with increasing incidence. This recent rise in the number of new cases could be partly attributed to the disruption of response interventions following the latest spate of insecurity, and continuing pockets of community mistrust. The transmission remains most intense in seven main hotspot areas: Katwa, Mabalako, Mandima, Butembo, Musienene, Kalunguta, and Beni. A new case was also reported in the health zone of Alimbongo this week, with links to cases deriving from Katwa. Responses activities are ongoing in EVD affected provinces.

World: Education in Danger Monthly News Brief, April 2019

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Algeria, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Cuba, Gabon, Kenya, Libya, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic,...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 17 – 23, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Namibia, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan...

World: Aperçu du financement humanitaire, Avril 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

L’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale (GHO), publié le 4 décembre 2018 annonçait des besoins en financement de 21,9 milliards de dollars pour 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour les réfugiés et les migrants du Venezuela (RMRP). À la fin du mois de mars, en raison essentiellement de la publication du HRP de la Syrie nécessitant 3,32 milliards de dollars, les besoins avaient atteint 25,11 milliards de dollars. Ce mois-ci, l’augmentation des besoins pour l’Appel éclair révisé du Zimbabwe (suite au Cyclone Idai), passant de 233,8 millions à 293,9 millions de dollars, porte le total des besoins au 30 avril, à 25,17 milliards de dollars.
Les besoins financiers pour les Plans de réponse humanitaire du Burundi et de l’Irak, tous deux récemment publiés, correspondent à ce qui avait été anticipé dans l'aperçu de la situation humanitaire. À la fin du mois d’avril, le nombre de personnes dans le besoin dans 55 pays est estimé à 140,8 millions.². Les besoins humanitaires du Burundi et de l’Irak avaient déjà été anticipés dans l’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale de cette année.
Les plans visent à fournir une assistance à 105,7 millions de personnes.

Mozambique: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 19: 6 – 12 May 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 12 May 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 68 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key ongoing events, including:

  • Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Dengue fever in Mauritius
  • Measles in Chad
  • Humanitarian crisis in Ethiopia.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • Challenges associated with insecurity and pockets of community mistrust continue to characterize the response to the Ebola virus disease outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo. Several major security incidents occurred in Butembo and its neighbouring health zones during the reporting week, leading to momentary suspension of response activities in the area. While response operations have resumed, we expect that the disruption of activities due to restricted access will result in a further rise in the number of cases in the coming days. In addition to the insecurity and complex socio-political environment, the response activities continue to suffer from funding gaps. The implementation of proven public health measures must continue, while a major surge in political and financial support from all national and international actors is urgently needed in order to bring this outbreak to end. The national and local authorities, WHO and partners remain committed to this cause.

  • While good efforts have been made in response to the effects of the Tropical Cyclone Idai that hit Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe early in March 2019, more humanitarian assistance is needed. All the three affected countries are still facing challenges around access to affected populations, risks of communicable diseases, limited access to healthcare services, and resettlement of displaced persons in the light of the massive destruction of homes, infrastructure and crops at a crucial time of the year. The national authorities, partners and donors need to step up provision of aid assistance in order to prevent long-term humanitarian crises in a large area of southern Africa.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 10 – 16, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Na...

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 Monthly Funding Update – April 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

The Global Humanitarian Overview published on 4 December announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMPP). By the end of March, mainly as a result of publication of the Syria HRP requiring $3.32 billion, the requirements had reached $25.11 billion. This month’s increase in requirements for the revised Zimbabwe Flash Appeal (following Cyclone Idai) from $233.8 million to $293.9 million, brings the total requirement as at 30 April to $25.17 million.

Financial requirements for the Burundi and Iraq Humanitarian Response Plans, which were both published recently, are as anticipated in the annual, global appeal.

As at the end of April, 140.8 million people are estimated to be in need in 54 countries.2 This is the same number as at the end of the previous month. Humanitarian needs in Burundi and Iraq had already been anticipated in the annual, global appeal.

The plans aim to provide assistance for 105.7 million people.

Mozambique: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 18: 29 April – 5 May 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 5 May 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 67 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key ongoing events, including:

  • Cyclone Kenneth in Comoros and Mozambique
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Burkina Faso
  • Humanitarian crisis in Democratic Republic of the Congo

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.
A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • The current trend of intensified transmission of Ebola virus infections across multiple hotspots in North Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo increases the already high risk of further spread of the disease to other provinces and to surrounding countries. The situation is likely to worsen in the coming days as the operating environment has increasingly become more insecure and socio-politically complex. Additionally, the existing funding gap could lead to WHO and partners rolling back some activities precisely when they are most needed. There is an urgent need to increase both technical and financial support from all national and international actors in order to arrest this situation. WHO urges the international community to step up support to the ongoing response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

  • Tropical Cyclone Kenneth has caused serious devastation in the Comoros Islands and northern part of Mozambique. The number of people impacted has risen as further information becomes available from affected areas. Immediate humanitarian assistance is beginning to reach the affected communities as access is gradually improving. The risk of water- and vector-borne diseases is high due to water contamination and water shortages, calling for accelerated establishment of preventive and preparedness measures. There is a need to step up provision of humanitarian assistance as well as planning for early recovery of the affected communities.

Yemen: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, May 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Haiti, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

Overview

Indonesia will hold the presidency in May. An open debate on peacekeeping focused on better training to improve the safety and security and performance of UN peacekeepers is planned. Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi will chair the meeting. Secretary-General António Guterres; the force commander of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lieutenant General Elias Rodrigues Martins Filho; and the director of the secretariat of the International Forum for the Challenges of Peace Operations, Björn Holmberg, are expected to brief.

The other open debate in May is on protection of civilians in conflict with a focus on community engagement as a means of enhancing the protection of civilians.

There are several mandate renewals related to African issues: UNISFA in Abyei and AMISOM in Somalia, as well as for the 2206 South Sudan Sanctions Committee and its Panel of Experts.

Other African issues include:

  • Burundi, on the political situation;
  • Libya, briefings by the ICC Prosecutor, the chair of the 1970 Libya Sanctions Committee, and by the head of UNSMIL;
  • Somalia, a briefing on UNSOM; and
  • Sahel, a briefing on the activities of the joint force of the Group of Five for the Sahel.

A briefing and consultations on the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq is scheduled ahead of its mandate renewal. In addition, the following Middle East issues will be considered:

  • Lebanon, on the implementation of resolution 1559;
  • Syria, the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weapons; and
  • Yemen, an update on the implementation of resolution 2452, which established the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement.

Regarding Europe, Council members are expecting to discuss the Secretary-General’s report on the negotiations on Cyprus. There will also be the biannual debate on Bosnia and Herzegovina.

On Asia, the Council will be briefed in consultations on the work of the 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee.

The annual briefing by the chairs of the three counter-terrorism subsidiary bodies is also expected.

The Council may meet to discuss the transition of the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) as the Secretary-General is scheduled to submit details for a follow-up mission this month.

It is likely that there will be two Arria-formula meetings: on Palestine and on peacebuilding.

Mozambique: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 17: 22 – 28 April 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 28 April 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 68 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key ongoing events, including:

  • Cyclone Kenneth in Comoros and Mozambique
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Measles in Nigeria
  • Humanitarian crisis in Mali.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • Tropical Cyclone Kenneth has hit the Comoros Islands and parts of Mozambique, barely weeks after tropical Cyclone Idai devastated Mozambique, as well as Malawi and Zimbabwe. While the death toll and injuries have been relatively low, damage to physical infrastructure, crops and livestock were significant, impacting on the livelihoods of the affected communities. The immediate humanitarian needs include ensuring access to the affected people, relocation of displaced families and provision of shelter, food, potable water and healthcare services, as well as restoration of electricity and communication.

  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with increasing incidence. This recent rise in the number of new cases could be partly attributed to the disruption of response interventions following the latest spate of insecurity, including the attacks on the response teams, and continuing pockets of community mistrust. The response teams are beginning to restore full operations in all outbreak affected areas and hope to halt this trend.

World: La France et le PAM luttent ensemble pour faire reculer la faim à travers le monde

Source: World Food Programme
Country: Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, France, Jordan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Senegal, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

PARIS – Grâce à la politique française d’aide au développement, et avec une contribution de près de 11 800 000 euros, le Programme Alimentaire Mondial poursuit son combat contre la faim et la malnutrition.

En 2018, 113 millions de personnes ont souffert d’insécurité alimentaire sévère. Une nouvelle fois, la France se mobilise. Cette contribution à destination de 18 pays va permettre au PAM de poursuivre son travail en apportant une aide alimentaire et nutritionnelle, des repas scolaires, ainsi qu’en renforçant la résilience et l’autonomie en reconstruisant les moyens de subsistance des femmes et des hommes. Beaucoup de ces pays sont touchés par de graves conflits, première cause de la faim dans le monde.

C’est notamment le cas en République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) - l'un des pays les plus touchés par les conflits en Afrique – où 85 millions d'habitants sont confrontés à l'une des pires crises alimentaire et nutritionnelle au monde. Le PAM salue également la contribution anticipée de la France au Yémen, où les taux de malnutrition chez les femmes et les enfants sont parmi les plus élevés du monde : 3,2 millions de femmes et d'enfants nécessitent un traitement pour malnutrition aiguë.

Bon nombre des personnes que nous aidons fuient le conflit et ont été forcées d'abandonner leurs terres, leurs maisons et leurs emplois. La contribution française permettra ainsi au PAM de venir en aide aux réfugiés syriens au Liban et en Jordanie principalement, permettant notamment aux enfants d’obtenir un repas chaud grâce aux cantines scolaires. L’impact des investissements dans le cadre scolaire est indéniable, un tel dispositif est indispensable au développement des jeunes générations qui représentent le futur de ces pays. La contribution française permet au PAM de faire de l’éducation un levier pour la croissance et le développement des zones les plus fortement touchées, en ligne avec les politiques nationales. Les filles sont au cœur de cette politique, car elles sont souvent les premières à être retirée de l’école et à souffrir de l’insécurité alimentaire.

La France marque de nouveau son attachement à la collaboration inter-agences et finance plusieurs projets menés conjointement par le PAM et d’autres agences des Nations-Unies (FAO, UNICEF), notamment au Mali, qui porte principalement sur des activités de nutrition. En dépit des progrès considérables réalisés au cours des dernières décennies, la malnutrition demeure un problème immense et universel, qui touche tous les pays du monde et responsable de plus de problèmes de santé que toute autre cause.

Au total, l’engagement de la France permettra au PAM d’intervenir dans 18 pays : au Bangladesh, au Burkina Faso, au Burundi, en Corée du Nord, à Djibouti, en Éthiopie, en Jordanie, au Laos, au Liban, à Madagascar, au Mali, en Mauritanie, au Nigeria, en République démocratique du Congo, au Sénégal, au Soudan, au Tchad et dans les territoires palestiniens. A cette contribution s’ajoute l’aide anticipée pour répondre à l’urgence au Yémen ainsi qu’aux besoins du service aérien d’aide humanitaire des Nations unies (UNHAS) en République centrafricaine et en Mauritanie. UNHAS est parfois le seul moyen d’atteindre des zones reculées. C’est un outil indispensable pour toute la communauté humanitaire et nous remercions la France d’avoir contribué à maintenir ce service menacé par le manque de financement.

Grâce à cette contribution, le PAM peut continuer à œuvrer dans les zones de crises mais également à lutter contre les inégalités, priorité du G7 et commune au PAM et à la France.

# # #

Le Programme alimentaire mondial des Nations Unies - sauve des vies dans les situations d'urgence et change des vies pour des millions de personnes grâce au développement durable. Le PAM travaille dans plus de 80 pays à travers le monde, nourrissant les populations prises dans des conflits et des catastrophes, et instaurant les bases d'un avenir meilleur.

World: Aperçu du financement humanitaire, Mars 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

L’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale (GHO), publié le 4 décembre 2018 annonçait des besoins en financement de 21,9 milliards de dollars pour 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour les réfugiés et les migrants du Venezuela (RMRP). À la fin du mois de février, les besoins s’élevaient à 22,42 milliards de dollars et, au 31mars, le montant demandé avait atteint 25,11 milliards de dollars. L’augmentation enregistrée ce mois-ci est principalement due à la demande de 3,32 milliards de dollars pour le HRP de la Syrie qui n’avait pas été inclus dans le calcul des besoins globaux en février, la finalisation du Plan de l’Éthiopie et les besoins associés à la réponse du Cyclone tropical Idai au Mozambique. À la fin du mois de mars, le nombre de personnes dans le besoin est estimé à 140,8 millions, par rapport à 138,8 millions à la fin du mois de février, dans 54 pays.2 Un nombre plus important de personnes sont estimées être dans le besoin en Éthiopie et au Mozambique qu’en février et davantage au Yémen.
Le nombre total de personnes que les plans visent à assister est aujourd’hui de 105,7 millions par rapport à 103,7 millions en février.

L’Appel Éclair pour le Mozambique envisageait une aide à 700 000 des 815 000 personnes affectées par la sécheresse. Ce plan a été révisé suite au passage du Cyclone Idai afin d’aider 1,1 million de personnes de plus. En Éthiopie, 300 000 personnes de plus que le nombre estimé précédemment doivent recevoir une assistance. De même, le nombre de personnes devant recevoir une assistance au Yémen est de 21,4 millions au lieu des 15 millions estimés précédemment. Des millions de personnes au Yémen sont aujourd’hui plus sous l’emprise de la faim, de la maladie et d’une plus grande vulnérabilité qu’il y a un an. En Syrie, le chiffre avancé de 11,2 millions de personnes devant recevoir une assistance a été révisé à la hausse ce mois-ci pour atteindre 11,7 millions de personnes.

World: FAO Early Warning Early Action report on food security and agriculture (April – June 2019)

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security and agriculture is produced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It provides a quarterly forward-looking analysis of major disaster risks to food security and agriculture, specifically highlighting:

• potential new emergencies resulting from imminent disaster threats

• new developments in countries already affected by protracted crises which are likely to cause a further deterioration of food insecurity

This report is part of FAO’s efforts to systematically link early warnings to anticipatory actions. By providing specific early action recommendations for each country, the report aims to prompt FAO and partners to proactively mitigate and/or prevent disasters before they start to adversely impact food security.

High risk

Countries are categorized as “high risk” when there is a high likelihood of a new emergency or a significant deterioration of the current situation with potentially severe effects on agriculture and food security.

On watch

Countries categorized as “on watch” instead have a comparatively more moderate likelihood and/or potential impact, requiring close monitoring.

This report represents a summary and a prioritization of analysis provided by FAO’s corporate and joint multi-agency information and early warning systems:

• Global Information and Early Warning System on Food and Agriculture (GIEWS)

• Food Chain Crisis and Emergency Prevention System (FCC-EMPRES)

• Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) and Cadre Harmonisé

In addition to these, a number of other external sources are consulted. The list of sources is available on page vii.
Countries with ongoing emergency response efforts are not included in the report, unless there are signs of potential significant deterioration. An overview of countries worldwide with humanitarian response plans or emergency plans is provided on page vi.

More details on the risk ranking methodology and the early action recommendations are provided on page ii.

World: Aid Workers Kidnapped 2018

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guatemala, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Peru, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

Kidnapping data trends

• The number of kidnappings and individual aid workers who were kidnapped peaked in April 2018. July, August and September also recorded high numbers of kidnappings.

• Between February and May, 36 aid workers were kidnapped while travelling in Central and Western Equatoria states in South Sudan. Many incidents occurred when agencies entered previously inaccessible areas where there have been reports of conflict parties accusing aid workers of spying.

• During July and August, 20 aid workers were kidnapped in eastern DRC by armed groups that included the Forces Démocratiques de Libération du Rwanda and Mai-Mai.

• In September, 13 Yemeni aid workers were kidnapped by Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula militants in Dhale governorate, Yemen. They were freed after local tribal leaders negotiated their release.

• 71 aid workers in Tanzania, Mali, Yemen and South Sudan were released following their abduction, while seven aid workers were killed or tortured by their abductors while in captivity in Afghanistan, CAR, the DRC and Nigeria.

• In the DRC, unidentified gunmen kidnapped three aid workers in North Kivu, two of whom were found dead the following day, while the third was released after two days. In Afghanistan, opposition forces kidnapped and killed one aid worker in Kunduz. In Nigeria, ISIS militants executed two aid workers following their abduction; three others were killed in the initial attack and one aid worker remains in captivity. In CAR, two local aid workers were abducted and tortured allegedly by anti-Balaka fighters while providing vaccinations in Haute-Kotto prefecture.

• Six aid workers were held hostage in Tanzania and Uganda. In Tanzania, casual labourers held five aid workers hostage to enforce their demands for payment for work completed. All were released after several hours of negotiations.

• Ransom demands were made for the release of six aid workers in CAR and the DRC. Five Congolese aid workers were abducted by armed men while travelling in the DRC. Two others were kidnapped and assaulted in the attack, but were released unconditionally. One aid worker was held for three days by members of the Front Populaire pour la Renaissance de Centrafrique in CAR. The aid worker was released after a ransom was paid; it is not clear who paid the ransom.

• Four aid workers were the victims of 'express kidnappings' in Kenya, Peru and Tanzania and forced to withdraw money from ATMs for their release. The aid worker in Kenya was also drugged and the one in Peru was physically assaulted.

• Nearly 50% of kidnapped aid workers are either still in captivity or their status is unknown. Seven are reported as missing in the DRC, Burkina Faso, Cambodia and Guatemala. The lack of precise information on what happened to aid workers following their abduction in Afghanistan, Somalia and Syria means that our overall understanding of the kidnapping threats facing aid workers in these countries remains incomplete.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 Monthly Funding Update – March 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

The Global Humanitarian Overview published on 4 December announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMPP). By the end of February, requirements had reached $22.42 billion and as at 31 March the amount requested had risen to $25.11 billion. The escalation this month is principally due to the requirement of $3.32 billion for the Syria HRP, which was not part of the calculation of overall requirements in February; the finalization of the Ethiopia plan; and the requirements for Tropical Cyclone Idai response in Mozambique.

As at the end of March, 140.8 million people, as against to 138.8 million at the end of February, are estimated to be in need in 54 countries.

More people are calculated to be in need in Ethiopia and Mozambique than in February, and more in Yemen.

The overall number of people the plans aim to assist is now 105.7 million as compared to 103.7 million in February. The Flash Appeal for Mozambique envisaged aiding 700,000 of the 815,000 drought affected people. That plan has been revised, following the passage of Cyclone Idai, to aid a further 1.1 million people. In Ethiopia, 300,000 people over and above the number estimated previously are to receive assistance. In addition, the number of people to receive assistance in Yemen has increased to 21.4 million people, rather than the 15 million previously estimated. Millions of people in Yemen are now hungrier, sicker and more vulnerable than a year ago. In Syria, the figure of 11.2 million people to receive assistance put forth in February has been revised this month to 11.7 million.

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