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Posts published in “Côte d’Ivoire”

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 28: 8 – 14 July 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 14 July 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 71 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (environmental sample) in Ghana

  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo

  • Humanitarian crisis in Cameroon

  • Humanitarian crisis in Central African Republic.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

This week, health authorities in Ghana confirmed circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) in an environmental sample. Additionally, two case-patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) tested positive for genetically linked cVDPV2 in Haut Lomami Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The frequency of occurrence of cVDPV2 events in the African Region has been increasing (lately), with three major loci, situated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Lake Chad basin and the Horn of Africa. These epicentres are characterized by major prolonged complex humanitarian emergencies – with insecurity, disrupted health systems and social dislocation. However incidentally, the countries around these epicentres also have conditions that are conducive to the rapid spread of polioviruses, namely accumulation of unprotected persons, suboptimal sanitation and high population mobility. The circulation of vaccine-derived polioviruses in the African region is likely to become a major public health problem if not tackled decisively at this point in time.

The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues. The occurrence of a confirmed case in Goma on 14 July 2019, while long anticipated and prepared for, emphasises the enormous challenges around control of this outbreak, reinforcing the need for strong and consistent implementation of all public health measures. While progress is slowly being made, the ongoing response operations are being challenged by suboptimal resourcing, negatively impacting on the entire response. Member States and other donors are strongly encouraged to provide additional funding in order to ensure that hard won progress in containing this EVD outbreak will not suffer a potentially devastating setback due to financial limitations

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: July 12 – 18, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Uzbekistan, World

Dry conditions persist in West Africa, while heavy rainfall triggers flooding in South Sudan and Uganda

  1. A delayed rainy season over Senegal, Mali, Gambia, and Guinea Bissau resulted in abnormal dryness. Despite increased rainfall last week, deficits are forecast to persist.

  2. Below-average rainfall since April has led to early-season deficits and abnormal dryness in central Nigeria.

  3. Heavy rainfall triggered flooding in western Sudan. Continued rainfall forecast next week maintains the risk for flooding.

  4. Heavy rainfall during the past weeks has caused flooding in eastern Uganda and northwestern Kenya. Heavy rainfall forecast next week is likely to maintain high flood risk.

  5. A delayed start to monsoon rains has been marked by several consecutive weeks of below-average rainfall and 25-50% of average rainfall to date in parts of Nigeria and Cameroon.

  6. Rainfall deficits developed over the past month in southeastern Cote d’Ivoire. Abnormal dryness is likely to persist

World: International Activity Report 2018

Source: Médecins Sans Frontières
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russian Federation, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

By Dr Marc Biot, Dr Isabelle Defourny, Marcel Langenbach, Kenneth Lavelle, Bertrand Perrochet and Teresa Sancristoval, Directors of Operations

In 2018, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams provided medical and humanitarian assistance to people facing extreme hardship in over 70 countries. From treating war-wounded ever closer to frontlines in Yemen, to responding to epidemic outbreaks such as cholera in Niger, or providing assistance to people fleeing violence in the Central African Republic, emergency response continued to be a core part of our work.

As 2018 drew to a close, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was in the midst of its second Ebola outbreak of the year, and its biggest ever. MSF was part of the response, led by the Ministry of Health. Although rapid and well-resourced, with teams having access to a promising new vaccine and several new drugs with the potential to better protect and treat people, the response, and those managing it, failed to adapt to people’s priorities, and to gain the trust of the community. This lack of trust in the health services meant people delayed or avoided seeking treatment. By the end of the year, the epidemic in North Kivu and Ituri provinces had claimed more than 360 lives and in some areas was still not under control.

Seeking care in war zones

Early in the year, Syrian civilians and medical staff were caught in the violence in Idlib, in the northwest, and in East Ghouta, near the capital Damascus. In East Ghouta, the barrage was relentless in February and March, with waves of dead and injured arriving at MSF- supported hospitals and health posts. As the siege blocked incoming aid, medical staff had few medical supplies to work with. By the end of the offensive, 19 of the 20 hospitals and clinics we supported were destroyed or abandoned, leaving civilians with few options to seek medical help.

The war in Yemen, which has left the country and its healthcare system in ruins, entered its fourth year. The Saudi- and Emirati-led coalition continued to target civilian areas with airstrikes and bombings, including our new cholera treatment centre in Abs. The war is taking a heavy toll on people, who often must negotiate constantly changing frontlines to find care for their war- wounds or their general medical needs. Yemen was the country where our teams treated the highest number of war-wounded in 2018, over 16,000 people. After a major offensive was launched in Hodeidah in June, doctors in our Aden hospital treated Hodeidah residents who had been driven for six hours, the majority of them in a critical condition. Conflict intensified on several frontlines at the end of the year, leading to an influx of people with war-related injuries. We also treated more than 150 people wounded by mines planted by Houthi-led Ansar Allah troops around Mocha. Constant attacks on our staff and patients at facilities in Ad Dhale forced us to withdraw from the town in November.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 27: 1 – 7 July 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 7 July 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 74 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 in Angola
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Dengue fever in Côte d’Ivoire
  • Humanitarian crisis in north-east Nigeria.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • A new case of genetically-distinct circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) has been confirmed in Cuvango district, Huila Province, central Angola. This is the second cVDPV2 outbreak in Angola in 2019, occurring over 1 000 kilometers away from the first event. The occurrence of this event (symbolic) and the increasing frequency of cVDPV2 emergence across the African Region is becoming a major public health issue, given the compromised sanitation situation, high population mobility and challenges faced by the national immunization programmes. While comprehensive responses are being undertaken, these events should serve to remind all countries in the African region of the importance of improving the quality of routine and supplementary immunization activities and maintain high levels of polio (and all other antigens) vaccination coverage to minimize the risk and consequences of poliovirus circulation.

  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with persistent low transmission intensity. The weekly incidence showed some reduction in the number of new confirmed EVD cases this week, albeit with a fluctuating pattern. All efforts to step up and sustain ongoing response operations need to continue.

World: Crop Monitor for Early Warning | July 2019

Source: GEOGLAM
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview:

In East Africa, production prospects are poor for main season cereals in parts of Somalia and Kenya due to a delayed onset of rains and dry conditions. In West Africa, main season maize planting continues across the south of the region and conditions are favourable with good rains received. In the Middle East and North Africa, winter wheat crops are generally favourable due to good rains throughout the season except in parts of Morocco where poor production has resulted from dry conditions, and in Syria and Iraq due to ongoing conflict. In Southern Africa, winter wheat planted in May is favourable, except in Zambia, where dry conditions have carried over from the previous season. In Central and South Asia, winter cereals for harvest in August are favourable despite some dry conditions in May. In Southeast Asia, harvest of dry-season rice is complete in the north and favourable yields resulted except in parts of Thailand and Philippines. Planting of wet-season rice is underway and conditions are favourable with good rains at the start of the season. In Central America and the Caribbean primera season planting started in May and there is some concern due to irregular rainfall and dry conditions.

World: Le Canada annonce un soutien pour améliorer l’accès à une éducation de qualité pour les femmes et les filles vivant dans des pays fragiles, en situation de crise et aux prises avec des conflits

Source: Government of Canada
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Canada, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zimbabwe

Document d'information

L’engagement pris par le Canada, à hauteur de 400 millions de dollars, en faveur de l’éducation des femmes et des filles dans les États en situation de fragilité, de conflit et de crise, à l’appui de la Déclaration de Charlevoix du G7 sur l’éducation de qualité pour les filles, les adolescentes et les femmes des pays en développement, a permis de lancer les initiatives suivantes.

Building Resources Across Communities (BRAC) - Projet de 5 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour éliminer les obstacles et améliorer l’accès à une éducation de qualité, les résultats d’apprentissage ainsi que l’employabilité des filles et des femmes dans la région montagneuse de Chittagong au Bangladesh. Le projet touchera des filles, adolescentes et femmes autochtones et bengalaises vulnérables grâce à un soutien à 100 écoles primaires et 50 écoles secondaires, à la formation professionnelle et à la mobilisation communautaire.

BRAC Afghanistan - Projet de 12 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2020-2021) pour veiller à ce que les filles, les adolescentes et les jeunes femmes afghanes aient accès à une éducation sûre et de qualité dans les zones rurales et isolées de l’Afghanistan. En finançant des programmes d’éducation communautaire dans les zones les plus difficiles à atteindre, le projet s’attaquera aux obstacles à l’inscription et à la rétention des filles à l’école et incitera les communautés à soutenir la scolarisation des filles.

Société canadienne de la Croix-Rouge - Projet de 7,5 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour fournir un soutien à la prise en charge de l’hygiène menstruelle; des installations d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène salubres et hygiéniques; et une sensibilisation et une formation à la violence sexuelle et fondée sur le genre auprès de 9 000 filles d’âge scolaire et jeunes femmes dans 40 écoles de l’État du Gogrial Ouest au Soudan du Sud. Le projet permettra également de former les garçons, les enseignants et les membres de sexe masculin de la communauté, à l’intérieur et autour de ces mêmes écoles, et de les sensibiliser à la violence sexuelle et fondée sur le genre.

Ministère du Développement international du Royaume-Uni (DFID) - Projet de 15 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour améliorer l’inscription, la rétention et le rendement des filles à l’école en fournissant des transferts en espèces aux familles, en octroyant des subventions en espèces aux écoles pour former les enseignants et améliorer les infrastructures, de même qu’en menant des activités de communication axées sur le changement social et comportemental et des activités de mobilisation communautaire pour sensibiliser davantage à l’importance de l’éducation des filles. Il s’agit du plus important projet du pays consacré à l’amélioration de l’accès des filles à l’éducation; ce projet s’est révélé efficace pour accroître l’inscription et la rétention des filles à l’école, et améliorer leurs niveaux de réussite.

Equal Measures 2030 - Projet de 1 million de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2020-2021) pour accroître la capacité des organisations de défense des droits des femmes en Afrique subsaharienne à recueillir et à utiliser des données sexospécifiques de qualité sur les obstacles à l’éducation des filles et des femmes, pour défendre leur droit à l’éducation et faire entendre leur voix dans les processus décisionnels. Ce projet garantira que les ministères de l’éducation, les agences de l’ONU et les ONG utilisent des données de qualité pour assurer la prestation équitable de cette éducation.

Aide à l’enfance Canada - Projet de 9,8 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour mettre l’accent sur l’éducation de base des filles vulnérables dans les États du nord-est du Nigéria touchés par les conflits (États de Yobe et de Borno), où il est possible d’amorcer un rétablissement précoce en vue d’assurer l’égalité des chances en matière d’éducation des filles.

Together for Girls - Projet de 2 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2020-2021) pour mieux documenter la relation qui existe entre la violence sexuelle et les résultats scolaires, afin de cerner les obstacles à l’éducation propres à chaque pays. Ce projet tirera le meilleur parti des données déjà recueillies dans le cadre des enquêtes sur la violence à l’encontre des enfants, pour les analyser sous l’angle de l’éducation et les traduire en données utilisables, notamment par la visualisation des données. Il s’appuiera sur des données probantes pour améliorer les résultats d’apprentissage des filles et des adolescentes dans des contextes fragiles et affectés par des conflits et dans des situations humanitaires.

Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD) - Projet de 7 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour améliorer l’accès à une éducation de qualité de 13 925 garçons et filles (65 % de filles) dans les régions du Pakistan affichant un retard de développement. Ce projet permettra de reconstruire les écoles endommagées, d’offrir des fournitures adaptées au genre, de former les enseignants, de mobiliser les membres de la communauté pour permettre aux filles de fréquenter les écoles, ainsi que de soutenir le gouvernement régional dans la formulation et la mise en œuvre des politiques dans le secteur de l’éducation.

PNUD - Projet de 9,9 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour s’attaquer aux obstacles qui entravent l’offre et l’accès à l’éducation pour les filles, les adolescentes et les femmes de la région montagneuse de Chittagong au Bangladesh, y compris celles qui sont handicapées. Pour ce faire, un soutien sera apporté à 300 écoles maternelles et primaires, desservant environ 20 000 élèves, et une formation professionnelle sera dispensée. Ce projet contribuera à améliorer la capacité de dispenser un enseignement inclusif, soucieux de l’égalité des genres et respectueux de l’environnement aux niveaux préprimaire et primaire, de même qu’à améliorer l’accès des adolescentes et des femmes, y compris celles qui sont handicapées, à un enseignement et à une formation technique et professionnelle adaptés aux besoins et à la demande des filles et des femmes.

Fonds des Nations Unies pour la population (FNUAP) - Projet de 8 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2020-2021) pour travailler dans les écoles primaires et secondaires et avec les organismes communautaires afin d’éliminer les obstacles à l’accès et à la rétention des filles à l’école dans la région centrale de la Côte d’Ivoire. Il s’agira notamment de lutter contre la violence fondée sur le genre, de renforcer la capacité des filles à exercer leur pouvoir de décision, de renforcer les capacités du système éducatif à améliorer l’accès à l’éducation et la qualité de l’éducation, ainsi que de contribuer à changer les attitudes et comportements des dirigeants et des communautés à l’égard de la scolarisation des filles.

UNICEF – Projet de 20 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour soutenir le Programme mondial UNFPA-UNICEF visant à accélérer la lutte contre le mariage d’enfants afin d’appuyer l’élaboration de programmes et de politiques, la défense des intérêts et la recherche visant à éliminer le mariage d’enfants. Le programme a pour but d’intensifier les efforts menés en ce sens dans 12 pays en Afrique, en Asie et au Moyen-Orient. Le Programme mondial s’efforce de permettre aux filles exposées au risque de mariage précoce de choisir et d’orienter leur propre avenir, notamment en les aidant à poursuivre et à réussir leurs études, et vise à atteindre les filles non scolarisées grâce à des possibilités d’éducation et de formation. Il aide également les ménages et les communautés à promouvoir des attitudes positives à l’égard des adolescentes, et il vient renforcer les systèmes (éducation, santé et protection de l’enfance) qui fournissent des services aux adolescentes et les lois et politiques qui protègent et favorisent les droits des adolescentes.

UNICEF - Projet de 15 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour accroître le nombre de jeunes filles et d’adolescentes vulnérables ayant accès à des possibilités d’apprentissage sûres au Salvador, au Guatemala et au Honduras. Le projet vise également à les doter des connaissances et des compétences nécessaires pour se protéger contre les risques et, au besoin, pour accéder à l’éducation, à la formation ou à l’employabilité d’autres façons. Le projet, dont Aide à l’enfance est un partenaire d’exécution clé, se concentrera surtout sur le soutien aux filles, aux adolescentes et aux femmes, y compris celles qui souffrent de handicaps, aux personnes déplacées, aux migrantes, aux réfugiées, aux jeunes LGBTQI et aux jeunes mères.

UNICEF - Projet de 4 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour accroître les taux de scolarisation et d’achèvement des études des filles âgées de 10 à 18 ans, principalement dans la région de Tonkpi et le district d’Abidjan en Côte d’Ivoire, en améliorant l’accès des filles à l’éducation et en leur assurant une éducation inclusive, sûre et attentive aux différences entre les genres, notamment pour les filles handicapées. Ce projet permettra également aux adolescentes non scolarisées de retourner dans le système éducatif pour suivre une formation professionnelle afin de leur assurer un avenir durable.

War Child Canada - Projet de 3 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour étendre un projet pilote mené en République démocratique du Congo qui cible les filles non scolarisées dans les communautés touchées par des conflits grâce à l’apprentissage par la radio. Le projet a pour objectif de mettre au point un modèle d’éducation de rechange permettant d’offrir un enseignement par voie radiophonique aux filles qui sont incapables d’accéder aux écoles secondaires formelles en raison des responsabilités domestiques, des préjugés sexistes contre l’éducation des filles, des risques d’enlèvement ou d’agression sexuelle lorsqu’elles parcourent de longues distances à pied, du coût élevé de l’éducation et du conflit grandissant.

Entraide universitaire mondiale du Canada (EUMC) - Projet de 12 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour améliorer les résultats d’apprentissage des filles aux niveaux primaire supérieur et secondaire, ainsi qu’accroître le taux de scolarisation des jeunes femmes dans le camp de réfugiés de Kakuma et le camp de réfugiés de Kalobeyei, au Kenya, dans le cadre d’une formation professionnelle axée sur le marché et tenant compte des besoins des femmes. L’initiative permettra à des adolescentes et jeunes femmes ainsi qu’à des membres de la communauté et acteurs de l’éducation d’accéder à l’éducation et à la formation professionnelle. EUMC travaillera avec Windle International Kenya, une organisation non gouvernementale locale, dans les domaines de la formation des enseignants, de la promotion de l’accès à l’éducation et du développement de milieux d’apprentissage favorables aux filles.

Les initiatives suivantes sont issues de l’appel de propositions « Éliminer les obstacles et améliorer la qualité de l’éducation des femmes et des filles dans les pays fragiles, en situation de crise et aux prises avec des conflits » :

Agence de développement et de secours adventiste Canada - Projet de 11,1 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour offrir aux filles et aux femmes des communautés fragiles, éloignées et touchées par les conflits au Soudan, au Myanmar et au Niger, des voies d’accès à un enseignement primaire inclusif et équitable, à un apprentissage accéléré et à une formation aux moyens de subsistance qui leur permettront d’avoir un accès plus égalitaire aux occasions offertes par le marché, généralement dominé par les hommes. Le projet comprend des solutions locales novatrices et durables qui permettent un enseignement primaire inclusif. Le projet visera à identifier et à former des enseignants vivant dans les communautés ciblées avant de leur demander de dispenser un enseignement communautaire dans la langue locale, adapté au contexte local et qui bénéficiera de l’adhésion et du soutien de la communauté.

Agriteam Canada - Projet de 12 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2023-2024) pour améliorer l’offre de programmes d’éducation formelle et non formelle, l’accès à ces programmes et la rétention des participants, dans les communautés affectées par les conflits au Mali — principalement pour les filles, mais aussi pour les garçons. Les stratégies comprennent des programmes radiophoniques interactifs, l’innovation numérique pour réduire les obstacles à l’éducation des filles, la formation professionnelle pour les filles qui n’ont pas accès à l’enseignement primaire/de base, et des cours de rattrapage pour les filles ayant des difficultés d’apprentissage.

CARE Canada - Projet de 9,4 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour renforcer l’écosystème éducatif et les capacités des adolescentes et des jeunes femmes (âgées de 12 à 22 ans) au Zimbabwe. Le projet cible les obstacles socio-économiques qui empêchent les filles de poursuivre des études secondaires ou de suivre une formation professionnelle et de réussir leur passage vers l’âge adulte. Le projet propose de réunir la communauté scolaire pour définir les caractéristiques et les systèmes qui permettent de bâtir des écoles conscientes des risques, résilientes, sûres et innovantes.

Cuso International - Projet de 12,9 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2023-2024) en vue de favoriser l’accès des adolescentes à l’enseignement supérieur et d’éliminer un certain nombre d’obstacles qui entravent l’éducation des adolescentes en Éthiopie. Le projet soutiendra l’amélioration des compétences scolaires, sociales et non techniques des adolescentes, y compris celles qui sont handicapées, et renforcera la capacité des enseignants et des établissements d’enseignement à dispenser une éducation de qualité et attentive aux différences entre les genres. L’initiative cherche à adopter une approche holistique et transformationnelle pour s’attaquer aux obstacles à l’enseignement supérieur des filles, notamment par la mobilisation communautaire.

Fondation Paul Gérin-Lajoie et Centre d’étude et de coopération internationale (CECI) - Projet de 13,9 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour répondre aux besoins éducatifs essentiels des filles, adolescentes et femmes réfugiées, déplacées, rapatriées et handicapées, dans la région des Grands Lacs africains. Le projet préconise un modèle de parcours de vie individuel intensif pour chaque fille d’âge scolaire, et s’appuie sur l’élaboration de plans de réponse spécifiques, fondés sur des données probantes et particulières, concernant les besoins de chaque enfant. Le projet permettra d’améliorer les résultats scolaires des filles inscrites dans 13 écoles primaires et secondaires et de soutenir les filles et les femmes grâce à une formation professionnelle informelle.

Right To Play - Projet de 6,6 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour offrir un programme d’éducation tenant compte des sexospécificités et des conflits, à l’intention des filles réfugiées et rapatriées, y compris les filles handicapées, affectées par la crise burundaise des réfugiés au Burundi et en Tanzanie. Les responsables du projet travailleront avec une population transfrontalière et offriront des services aux réfugiés et aux rapatriés des deux côtés, en apportant un soutien particulier au passage de l’école primaire à l’école secondaire. Entre autres approches novatrices, le projet permettra d’élaborer et de mettre à l’essai un nouveau modèle d’apprentissage sensible aux conflits, fondé sur le jeu et attentif aux différences entre les genres. Ce modèle aidera les adolescentes, y compris les mères adolescentes et les filles handicapées, à accéder à d’autres formes d’éducation et à réintégrer le système scolaire.

Entraide universitaire mondiale du Canada et Fondation Aga Khan Canada - Projet de 15,9 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2022-2023) pour renforcer le pouvoir des adolescentes et des jeunes femmes âgées de 10 à 24 ans qui suivent des parcours éducatifs dans les zones touchées par la crise en Ouganda, au Soudan du Sud et en Syrie. Le projet touchera les filles et les femmes marginalisées qui sont réfugiées, les personnes déplacées à l’intérieur de leur propre pays et les membres les plus vulnérables des communautés d’accueil. Le projet permettra de réduire les obstacles sociaux, culturels et économiques à l’accès à l’éducation, tels que la violence sexuelle et fondée sur le genre et l’absence de droits en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive en situation de crise. Il permettra de mettre en œuvre des interventions novatrices, notamment des campagnes médiatiques, des activités de sensibilisation communautaire, des clubs de filles et de garçons, des fonds d’intervention souples et des programmes de mentorat pour les filles.

Le Canada contribue aussi à la mise en œuvre de la Déclaration de Charlevoix sur l’éducation de qualité pour les filles, les adolescentes et les femmes dans les pays en développement, en finançant les initiatives suivantes.

Aide à l’enfance Canada - Projet de 10 millions de dollars (de 2017-2018 à 2022-2023) pour améliorer la qualité des services de santé sexuelle et reproductive pour les adolescents, garçons et filles, scolarisés et non scolarisés, en s’attaquant aux obstacles sociaux, culturels et sexospécifiques auxquels ils sont confrontés et en encourageant les changements culturels et comportementaux dans les communautés de certains districts de la province de Zambézia au Mozambique.

UNESCO - Projet de 1,5 million de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour fournir une assistance technique au ministère de l’Éducation de la Jordanie, en partenariat avec l’UNESCO, afin d’améliorer l’élaboration des politiques, la planification et la coordination stratégiques fondées sur des données probantes au sein du ministère de l’Éducation. Cet objectif sera atteint grâce à l’amélioration de la collecte et de l’utilisation des données, du suivi, de l’évaluation et de l’établissement de rapports à l’appui du Plan stratégique 2018-2022 de la Jordanie pour l’éducation. Ce soutien technique complète le projet Education for Jordan Prosperity (75 millions de dollars, de 2017-2018 à 2021-2022).

Institut de statistique de l’UNESCO (ISU) - Projet de 4 millions de dollars (de 2019-2020 à 2021-2022) pour produire et mettre à la disposition de la communauté internationale des données cohérentes, exactes et pertinentes servant à orienter les décisions prises dans un contexte politique, économique et social grandissant qui ne cesse d’évoluer et de se complexifier de plus en plus. L’ISU est la source des statistiques sur l’éducation et offre ses services aux États membres de l’UNESCO, au système des Nations Unies ainsi qu’à un ensemble d’instituts de recherche, d’universités et d’organisations intergouvernementales et non gouvernementales. L’ISU entretient des relations de travail avec plus de 70 pays et agit à titre de gardien et de contrôleur des données comparables à l’échelle internationale dans 200 pays dans lesquels des sondages sont menés annuellement afin d’établir des statistiques sur l’alphabétisme.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: July 5 – 11, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Uzbekistan, World

Flooding continues across Uganda while dry conditions remain in parts of West Africa

  1. A delayed rainy season over Senegal, Mali, Gambia, and Guinea Bissau resulted in abnormal dryness. Despite increased rainfall last week, deficits are forecast to persist.

  2. Below-average rainfall since April has led to early-season deficits and abnormal dryness in central Nigeria.

  3. Heavy rainfall triggered flooding in western Sudan. Continued rainfall forecast next week maintains the risk for flooding.

  4. Heavy rainfall during the past weeks has caused flooding in eastern Uganda and northwestern Kenya. Heavy rainfall forecast next week is likely to maintain high flood risk.

  5. A delayed start to monsoon rains has been marked by several consecutive weeks of below-average rainfall and 25-50% of average rainfall to date in parts of Nigeria and Cameroon.

  6. Rainfall deficits developed over the past month in southeastern Cote d’Ivoire. Abnormal dryness is likely to persist.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 26: 24 – 30 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 30 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 76 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived polio virus type 2 in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Hepatitis E in Namibia
  • Humanitarian crisis in Burkina Faso.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • Health authorities in Democratic Republic of the Congo reported two simultaneous events of genetically-distinct circulating vaccine-derived polio virus type 2 (cVDPV2) in Kasai and Sankuru provinces. In both events, two case-patients with acute flaccid paralysis were confirmed with geneticallylinked circulating vaccine derived poliovirus type 2. The two events become the fifth and sixth genetically-distinct cVDPV2 outbreaks in the country. While comprehensive responses are being undertaken, these events highlight the need to maintain high levels of routine polio vaccination coverage in all countries in the region to minimize the risk and consequences of any poliovirus circulation.
  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with insecurity incidents reported in Beni this week targeting Ebola response personnel. The weekly incidence showed minimum reduction in the number of new confirmed EVD cases this week, as the transmission intensity keeps fluctuating. All efforts to step up and sustain ongoing response operations need to continue.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: June 28 – July 4, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Uzbekistan, World

Dry conditions persist in West Africa, while heavy rainfall continues in Uganda and Kenya

  1. A delayed onset to the March-May rainfall season coupled with high temperatures has caused dryness across many areas of the Gambia.

  2. Below-average rainfall since April has led to early-season deficits and abnormal dryness in central Nigeria.

  3. Heavy rainfall during the past weeks has caused flooding in eastern Uganda and northwestern Kenya. Heavy rainfall forecast next week is likely to maintain high flood risk.

  4. A delayed start to monsoon rains has been marked by several consecutive weeks of below-average rainfall and 25-50% of average rainfall to date in parts of Nigeria and Cameroon.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 25: 17 – 23 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 23 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies
occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme
is currently monitoring 77 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key
new and ongoing events, including:

  • Cholera in Nigeria
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Ethiopia
  • Humanitarian crisis in South Sudan.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures
implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and
ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as
recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in North Kivu and Ituri provinces,
Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with fluctuating transmission
intensity. There has been a period of improved security recently, allowing
response teams to access communities and operate more freely. As a result,
indicators over the past few weeks provide early signs of an easing of the
transmission intensity in major hotspots. However, concerns remain over the
number of new cases still occurring in areas that previously had lower rates of
transmission. Additionally, the lack of funding to support response operations
has reached a worrying level. The international community must step up
funding to support the ongoing response and strengthen preparedness in
Democratic Republic of the Congo and neighbouring countries.

Health authorities in Nigeria have confirmed a new cholera outbreak in Adamawa
State, one of the three states in north-east Nigeria with prolonged complex
humanitarian emergencies. These states are vulnerable to experiencing large
cholera outbreaks, as has been seen in the recent past. It is therefore critical
that the current cholera outbreak is responded to swiftly at the initial stages
to prevent escalation of the situation.

World: World Bank Group Support in Situations Involving Conflict-Induced Displacement – An Independent Evaluation

Source: World Bank
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the Republic of North Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zambia

Highlights

  • In 2016, the World Bank Group stepped up its engagement in situations of conflictinduced forced displacement at the global and country levels and adopted a new approach to its engagement that recognizes displacement as a development challenge that must be addressed to attain the World Bank Group’s twin goals.

  • Since fiscal year 2016, the Bank Group’s analytical, financial, and operational support has become more aligned with its stated development approach building on lessons from past engagements. This is an important shift.

  • Advisory services and analytics have shifted from providing a rationale for Bank Group engagement in situations involving conflictinduced forced displacement to contextspecific needs assessments focused on evidence-based, medium-term solutions.
    The World Bank successfully mobilized new financing to support situations involving conflict-induced forced displacement and crowded-in funding from other donors. World Bank support for populations forcibly displaced by conflict and their host communities has increased, become more balanced, and focused on priority sectors to
    generate economic opportunities. These are significant achievements.

  • At the same time, the Bank Group has not yet fully leveraged its comparative
    advantages in implementing its development approach. Evidence generated
    from analytical and advisory services needs to be translated better into
    context-specific policy dialogue, project design, and programming.
    Project design, in particular, could further address the specific needs and
    vulnerabilities of conflict-induced forcibly displaced persons and their host
    communities, especially the specific needs and vulnerabilities of the women
    and children among them. Projects should also more systematically include
    specific indicators to monitor and evaluate the effects on affected populations.

  • The World Bank engages and coordinates with humanitarian actors and
    development organizations at various levels, but coordination could be further
    strengthened. Additionally, select partnerships at the country level could be
    leveraged to ensure sector coherence and to foster policy dialogue to enact
    institutional reforms toward self-reliance that address the vulnerabilities of
    forcibly displaced persons. The Bank Group could also increase engagement
    to catalyze the private sector’s role in situations of conflict-induced forced
    displacement.

  • Internal and external factors inhibit the Bank Group’s development
    response to address situations of conflict-induced forced displacement.
    Internal factors include varying levels of active leadership in Country
    Management Units, growing but still limited Bank Group experience, and
    incentives. External factors include the varying nature of displacement
    situations, government capacity, macroeconomic and development
    challenges, and complex political economy factors.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: June 21 – 27, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Togo, Uganda, Uzbekistan, World, Yemen

Heavy rainfall triggers flooding in North Darfur of Sudan, while dryness persists in parts of West Africa

  1. A delayed onset to the March-May rainfall season coupled with high temperatures has caused dryness in parts of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda.

  2. Below-average rainfall over the past since April have led to early-season deficits and abnormal dryness in central Nigeria.

  3. Heavy rainfall during the past weeks has caused flooding in eastern Uganda and triggered flooding in northwestern Kenya.
    Heavy rainfall forecast next week is likely to maintain high flooding risk.

  4. A delayed start to monsoon rains has been marked by several consecutive weeks of below-average rainfall and 25-50% of average rainfall to date across Sierra Leone and Liberia.

  5. Heavy rainfall last week caused flash flooding in North Darfur, Sudan.
    Heavy rainfall forecast next week is likely to worsen ground conditions

World: Tendencias global desplazados forzosos en 2018

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Malaysia, Mexico, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World

CAPÍTULO 1 Introducción

**El mundo actual tiene una población de 70,8 millones de desplazados forzosos. **

A lo largo de la última década, la población global de desplazados forzosos creció sustancialmente de 43,3 millones de 2009 a 70,8 millones en 2018 y alcanzó una cifra récord [gráfico 1]6. La mayor parte de este aumento se dio entre 2012 y 2015, provocado sobre todo por el conflicto sirio. Pero otros conflictos en distintas zonas también contribuyeron a este aumento, incluidos los de Irak y Yemen en Oriente Medio, la República Democrática del Congo (RDC) y Sudán del Sur en el África subsahariana, así como la llegada masiva de refugiados rohingya a Bangladesh a final de 2017.

En 2018 cabe destacar particularmente el aumento del número de desplazados por los desplazamientos internos de Etiopía y las nuevas solicitudes de asilo de personas que huían de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela. La proporción de población mundial desplazada también siguió subiendo, dado que el aumento de la población desplazada por la fuerza rebasó el crecimiento de la población mundial. En 2017, esta cifra era de una de cada 110 personas, pero en 2018 resultó en una de cada 1087 . En comparación, hace una década la cifra era de una de cada 160 [gráfico 2]. En total, la población refugiada bajo el mandato de ACNUR casi se ha duplicado desde 2012.

Durante 2018 se desplazó un gran número de personas. A lo largo del año, 13,6 millones de personas fueron nuevos desplazados, incluidas aquellas que buscaban protección en el extranjero (como solicitantes de asilo o bien como refugiados recién registrados)8 y 10,8 millones que fueron forzadas a huir pero permanecieron en sus países9.

Estos 13,6 millones de nuevos desplazamientos promediaron 37.000 nuevos desplazamientos diarios durante 2018 [gráfico 3]. Muchas otras personas regresaron a sus países o zonas de origen para tratar de retomar sus vidas, incluidos 2,3 millones de desplazados internos y cerca de 600.000 refugiados.

Con 1.560.800, los etíopes fueron el mayor grupo de desplazados durante el año, el 98% de ellos dentro de sus fronteras. Esto duplicó de largo en el país la población desplazada internamente.
Los sirios fueron la siguiente comunidad de nuevos desplazados, con 889.400 durante 2018. De ellos,

632.700 fueron nuevos desplazados (o nuevos registrados) fuera del país10, mientras los restantes fueron desplazados internos. Nigeria también tuvo un alto número de población desplazada, con 661.800, de los cuales se estima que 581.800 lo hizo internamente.

Entre los nuevos desplazados transfronterizos (o nuevos registrados), la gran mayoría permaneció cerca de sus hogares. En 2018, más de medio millón de nuevos registros de refugiado y solicitudes de asilo provinieron de la República Árabe de Siria, y la mayoría de ellos tuvieron lugar en Turquía [gráfico 4]. Ese número incluye tanto a los recién llegados como a quienes permanecían en el país en momentos previos al registro. Los venezolanos representaron el segundo mayor número de desplazamientos internacionales en 2018, con 341.800 nuevas solicitudes de asilo (véase la página 24 para más detalles sobre la situación de Venezuela). Los sursudaneses fueron el siguiente grupo de solicitantes de asilo, principalmente en Sudán y Uganda, seguidos de quienes dejaron la RDC, por lo general rumbo también a Uganda.

A final de 2018, los sirios siguieron siendo la mayor comunidad de desplazados forzosos, con 13 millones de personas, incluidos 6 654 000 refugiados, 6 184 000 desplazados internos y 140 000 solicitantes de asilo. Los colombianos fueron el segundo mayor grupo, con 8 millones de desplazados forzosos al cabo del año, la mayor parte de ellos (98%) dentro de su país11. Un total de 5,4 millones de congoleses de la RDC eran también desplazados forzosos, entre ellos 4.517.000 desplazados internos y 854.000 refugiados o solicitantes de asilo. Otras grandes poblaciones desplazadas a finales de 2018 – aquellas con más de 2 millones de personas desplazadas, ya sea internamente o como refugiados o solicitantes de asilo– fueron la de Afganistán (5,1 millones), Sudán del Sur (4,2), Somalia (3,7), Etiopía (2,8), Sudán (2,7), Nigeria (2,5), Irak (2,4) y Yemen (2,2).

En Camerún, la situación fue compleja debido a que fue un país de acogida y también de origen de refugiados y de solicitantes de asilo, y además, en 2018 se dieron desplazamientos internos múltiples. En total hubo 45.100 refugiados cameruneses a final del año. La mayoría de ellos fueron acogidos por Nigeria (32.800), lo que contrasta con los sólo 100 que había en el país a principios de año. Esto hay que añadirlo a los 668.500 desplazados internos, mayoritariamente en las regiones del sur, noroeste y extremo norte. Al mismo tiempo, Camerún acogió a 380.000 refugiados, principalmente de la República Centroafricana (RCA) (275 .000) y Nigeria (102.300).
Sin la protección de familiares, los menores no acompañados o separados están a menudo en riesgo de abuso y explotación. La falta de información y datos sobre ellos es un problema clave. El número reportado de esos menores que solicitó asilo durante el año fue de 27.600. A finales de año, entre la población refugiada fueron reportados 111.000 menores no acompañados o separados12. Estas cifras son a la baja dado el número limitado de países que proveen de ese dato.

Los retornos continúan siendo una pequeña parte de los desplazamientos y no superaron a los nuevos desplazamientos. Cerca de 593.800 refugiados regresaron a sus países de origen en 2018 frente a los 667.400 de 2017, menos de un 3% de la población refugiada. Además, 2,3 millones de desplazados internos regresaron en 2018, frente a 4,2 en 2017. En ciertos casos, refugiados y desplazados internos regresaron a situaciones en las que las condiciones no permitían retornos seguros ni sustentables.
La reubicación fue una solución para cerca de 92.400 refugiados.
En 2018, el Grupo de Expertos en Estadísticas sobre Refugiados y Desplazados Internos (EGRIS) presentó los resultados de su trabajo en la 49ª sesión de la Comisión de Estadística de Naciones Unidas. Establecido en 2016 por la comisión, el EGRIS tiene como labor abordar los desafíos que plantea la recolección, elaboración y diseminación de estadísticas sobre los refugiados, solicitantes de asilo y desplazados internos, incluida la falta de terminología uniforme y las dificultades para comparar internacionalmente las estadísticas.

La comisión:
• ratificó las recomendaciones internacionales sobre estadísticas de refugiados
• avaló el reporte técnico sobre estadísticas de desplazados internos y apoyó la propuesta para tomar en cuenta este trabajo y desarrollar recomendaciones formales, y
• reafirmó el mandato de elaborar un manual para recopiladores de estadísticas sobre refugiados y desplazados internos que sirva de guía práctica para las recomendaciones.

Además de los 40 países que participaron en el EGRIS y de aquellos que colaboraron a través de consultas globales en 2017, otros muchos representantes nacionales tomaron la palabra en la Comisión Estadística para dar la bienvenida a este trabajo. Algunas áreas del trabajo recibieron especial atención, como la mayor importancia dada a la coordinación y el papel clave de las oficinas nacionales de estadística, o la inclusión del potencial de otras fuentes de información y otras metodologías en las recomendaciones.

World: UNHCR Global Trends: Forced Displacement in 2018

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Malaysia, Mexico, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, United States of America, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World

CHAPTER 1 Introduction

The world now has a population of 70.8 million forcibly displaced people

Over the past decade, the global population of forcibly displaced people grew substantially from 43.3 million in 2009 to 70.8 million in 2018, reaching a record high [Figure 1].6 Most of this increase was between 2012 and 2015, driven mainly by the Syrian conflict. But conflicts in other areas also contributed to this rise, including in the Middle East such as in Iraq and Yemen, parts of sub-Saharan Africa such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and South Sudan, as well as the massive flow of Rohingya refugees to Bangladesh at the end of 2017.

Of particular note in 2018 was the increase in the number of displaced people due to internal displacement in Ethiopia and new asylum claims from people fleeing the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. The proportion of the world’s population who were displaced also continued to rise as the increase in the world’s forcibly displaced population outstripped global population growth. In 2017 this figure was 1 out of every 110 people but in 2018 it stood at 1 out of every 108 people.7 A decade ago, by comparison, this stood at about 1 in 160 people [Figure 2]. Overall, the refugee population under UNHCR’s mandate has nearly doubled since 2012.

Large numbers of people were on the move in 2018. During the year, 13.6 million people were newly displaced, including 2.8 million who sought protection abroad (as new asylum-seekers or newly registered refugees)8 and 10.8 million who were forced to flee but remained in their own countries.9 These 13.6 million new displacements equated to an average rate of 37,000 people being newly displaced every day of 2018 [Figure 3].

Still, many others returned to their countries or areas of origin to try to rebuild their lives, including 2.3 million internally displaced people and nearly 600,000 refugees.
At 1,560,800, Ethiopians made up the largest newly displaced population during the year, 98 per cent of them within their country. This increase more than doubled the existing internally displaced population in the country.

Syrians were the next largest newly displaced population, with 889,400 people during 2018. Of these, 632,700 were newly displaced (or newly registered) outside the country,10 while the remainder were internally displaced. Nigeria also had a high number of newly displaced people with 661,800, of which an estimated 581,800 were displaced within the country’s borders.
Among those newly displaced across borders (or newly registered), the vast majority remained close to home. Over half a million new refugee registrations and asylum applications originated from the Syrian Arab Republic (Syria) in 2018, the majority in Turkey [Figure 4], representing both newly arriving individuals and those already in the country for a period of time prior to the time of registration. Venezuelans accounted for the second largest flow of new international displacements in 2018, with 341,800 new asylum applications (see page 24 for more details on the Venezuela situation). South Sudanese accounted for the next largest refugee and asylum-seeker flow, mainly to Sudan and Uganda, followed by such flows from DRC, also mainly to Uganda.

At the end of 2018, Syrians continued to be the largest forcibly displaced population, with 13.0 million people living in displacement, including 6,654,000 refugees, 6,184,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) and 140,000 asylumseekers. Colombians were the second largest group, with 8.0 million forcibly displaced, most of them (98 per cent) inside their country at the end of 2018.11 A total of 5.4 million Congolese from DRC were also forcibly displaced, of whom 4,517,000 were IDPs and 854,000 were refugees or asylumseekers.

Other large displaced populations at the end of 2018 – those with over 2.0 million people displaced, either internally or as refugees or asylum-seekers – were from Afghanistan (5.1 million), South Sudan (4.2 million), Somalia (3.7 million), Ethiopia (2.8 million), Sudan (2.7 million),
Nigeria (2.5 million), Iraq (2.4 million) and Yemen (2.2 million).

The situation in Cameroon was complex as it was both a source country and host country of refugees and asylum-seekers. In addition, it was confronted with multiple internal displacements in 2018. In total, there were 45,100 Cameroonian refugees globally at the end of 2018; they were mainly hosted by Nigeria (32,800), compared with less than 100 in that country at the beginning of the year. This is in addition to 668,500 IDPs, mainly within the South, North West and the Far North regions of Cameroon. At the same time, Cameroon hosted 380,300 refugees, mainly from the Central African Republic (CAR) (275,700) and Nigeria (102,300).

Without the protection of family, unaccompanied and separated children are often at risk of exploitation and abuse. A key issue is the lack of information and data regarding this population. The number of such children reported as having applied for asylum during 2018 was 27,600 during the year. At the end of 2018, 111,000 unaccompanied and separated children were reported among the refugee population.12 These figures are underestimates due to the limited number of countries reporting data.

Returns continued to account for a small proportion of the displaced population and did not offset new displacements. Some 593,800 refugees returned to their countries of origin in 2018 compared with 667,400 in 2017, less than 3 per cent of the refugee population. In addition, 2.3 million IDPs returned in 2018, compared with 4.2 million in 2017. In some cases, refugees and IDPs went back to situations where conditions did not permit safe and sustainable returns. Resettlement provided a solution for close to 92,400 refugees.

In 2018, the Expert Group on Refugee and IDP Statistics (EGRIS) presented the results of its work at the 49th session of the UN Statistical Commission. Established in 2016 by the Commission, EGRIS is tasked with addressing challenges associated with the collection, compilation and dissemination of statistics on refugees, asylum-seekers and IDPs, including the lack of consistent terminology and difficulties in comparing statistics internationally.

The Commission:
- endorsed the International Recommendations on Refugee Statistics;
- endorsed the Technical Report on Statistics of IDPs and supported the proposal to upgrade this work to develop formal recommendations; and
- reaffirmed the mandate to develop a compiler’s manual on refugee and IDP statistics to provide hands-on guidance for the recommendations.

In addition to the 40 countries that took part in the EGRIS and those that had also contributed through the global consultations in 2017, several country representatives took the floor at the Statistical Commission to welcome this work.

Certain elements of the work received particular support such as focusing on the importance of coordination and the central role of national statistical offices, as well as including the potential of different data sources and methodologies within the recommendations.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 24: 10 – 16 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 16 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 75 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Ebola virus disease in Uganda
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Measles in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Mali.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • The emergence, this week, of a cluster of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases in Kasese District, western Uganda raised a lot of attention in the region and globally. This event affirmed the continuous risk of spread of the outbreak in the region and re-echoes the importance of enhancing preparedness and readiness measures in the neighbouring countries. The robust response mounted by health authorities in Uganda emphasized one of the key principles of International Health Regulations (IHR) 2005, namely ‘containment at source’. This is premised on attaining requisite capabilities for rapid detection and swift control of health events at their onset, thus preventing escalation of small outbreaks into large epidemics. The event in Uganda is a reminder to all State Parties in the African Region to work towards attaining the core capacities stipulated in the IHR (2005).

  • The Democratic Republic of the Congo has been experiencing recurrent measles outbreaks since 2010, with a significant surge in 2019. The Ministry of Health has formally declared the measles epidemic and is calling for all stakeholders to step up response efforts. The response to the measles outbreak (and many other health events) in Democratic Republic of the Congo have been challenged by under-resourcing, weak health systems, insecurity and social disentanglement.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: June 14 – 20, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Togo, Uganda, Uzbekistan, World, Yemen

Heavy rainfall causes flooding in eastern Uganda and northwestern Kenya

  1. A delayed onset to the March-May rainfall season coupled with high temperatures has caused dryness in parts of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda.

  2. Below-average rainfall over the past two months have led to early-season deficits and abnormal dryness in Nigeria.

  3. Heavy rainfall during the past weeks has caused flooding in eastern Uganda. Continued rainfall next week is likely to maintain high flooding risk.

  4. A delayed start to monsoon rains has been marked by four consecutive weeks of below-average rainfall and 25-50% of average rainfall to date across Sierra Leone and Liberia.

  5. Above-average rainfall during the past month has caused flooding in Ghana. Continued heavy rains next week maintain a high risk for flooding.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 23: 3 – 9 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 9 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 72 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Malaria in Burundi
  • Measles in Comoros Islands
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Central African Republic.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • There has been a significant reduction in the number of new Ebola virus disease cases and deaths reported in Democratic Republic of the Congo in the last weeks. While it is still too early to make any conclusions, this observed declining trend is very positive and encouraging. There have been several initiatives and efforts to step up the response to the outbreak in the past weeks.
    While still being aware of the prevailing risk factors in the communities, it is anticipated that these initiatives and intensified efforts will turn the tide on the ongoing high levels of transmissions of infections. The national authorities and all stakeholders need to sustain implementation of effective public health measures in order to bring this outbreak to an end.

  • Health authorities in Burundi have detected a potential malaria outbreak in several health districts in the country. This event comes barely one year after the occurrence of a large malaria outbreak in 2017, signifying the vulnerability of the country to malaria epidemics. The national authorities and partners need to capitalize on the early detection of this event and mount a robust response in order to bring the outbreak to a speedy end and avoid escalation of the situation.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: June 6 – 13, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Togo, Uganda, World

The Horn of Africa remains abnormally dry following poor March-May rain and a delayed onset to the season

  1. A delayed onset to the March-May rainfall season coupled with high temperatures has caused dryness in parts of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda.

  2. Below-average rainfall over the past two months have led to early-season deficits and abnormal dryness in Nigeria.

  3. Torrential rainfall during the past week has caused flash floods in Kampala, Uganda. Heavy rainfall is forecast to continue, maintaining high flood risk.

  4. A delayed start to monsoon rains has been marked by four consecutive weeks of below-normal rainfall and 25-50% of normal rainfall to date across Sierra Leone and Liberia.

  5. Heavy rainfall last week caused flooding in Accra, Ghana. Continued heavy rains next week maintain a high risk for flooding.

  6. Above-average sea-surface temperatures in the Indian Ocean are expected to strengthen Tropical cyclone development, which could impact parts of Somalia

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