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Posts published in “Disaster Management”

South Sudan: South Sudan Operation Overview – March 2019

Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan

Background

The Logistics Cluster facilitates the coordination of the logistics response in support of the humanitarian community. Furthermore, it p...

South Sudan: South Sudan – Crisis Fact Sheet #5, Fiscal Year (FY) 2019

Source: US Agency for International Development
Country: South Sudan, United States of America

HIGHLIGHTS

Insecurity in Eastern Equatoria, Upper Nile, and Western Bahr el Ghazal displaces populations and disrupts aid operations
Health actors continu...

Ethiopia: Ethiopia Humanitarian Bulletin Issue #6 | 18 – 31 March 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Ethiopia, South Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

• The Government and humanitarian partners revitalize of Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Dilla Town to coordinate IDP response in Gedeo zone...

Uganda: UNICEF Uganda Humanitarian Situation Report – February 2019

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Uganda

Highlights

  • While Uganda remains the largest refugee hosting country in Africa, the refugee population figure reduced following a verification exercise conducted in 2018 and due to the lower than anticipated refugee influx from Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), South Sudan and Burundi.

  • Sixty per cent of the 1,223,033 refugees in Uganda are children who bear the brunt of the displacement and remain at risk of abuse, neglect, violence and exploitation.

  • A total of 29,541 children were immunized against measles by the Ministry of Health (MoH) with support from UNICEF and the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI).

  • Over 11,829 children affected by displacement were enrolled in Early Childhood Development learning in Adjumani, Arua and Yumbe refugee hosting districts.

  • About 106 district education actors were trained on Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) prevention and control in Kabale and Rukungiri districts focusing on basic Ebola epidemiology, mode of transmission, signs and symptoms and impact of the disease on child protection.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian needs

According to UNHCR and Office of the Prime Minister (OPM), Uganda is host to 1,223,033 refugees as of 28 February 2019. Of these, 95 per cent live in settlements in 11 of Uganda’s 128 districts, and five per cent live in Kampala. Sixty per cent of the refugee population are children. Most of the refugees are from South Sudan (801,055), the DRC (326,383) and Burundi (36,256). In February, a total of 9,751 new refugee arrivals crossed over, including (4,658) from DRC, (4,635) from South Sudan and (458) from Burundi, which represents an overall increase of 73 per cent from January when 5,900 arrived.

Uganda’s Refugee Response Plan (RRP) 2019-2020 is being revised and it is anticipated the exercise will be completed by mid-March. Compared to the initial projections (June 2018), RRP partners need to plan for 422,000 refugees less in 2019 and 431,000 refugees less in 2020. The refugee population figure in Uganda has reduced following a verification exercise conducted in 2018 and the lower than anticipated refugee influx from Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), South Sudan and Burundi.

A recent survey was completed by Ground Truth Solutions (GTS) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on refugees and humanitarian staff in Uganda to understand how people affected by crises and humanitarian field staff perceive the impact of the Grand Bargain commitments. Among the key findings are that despite a modest improvement since 2017, most refugees (53 per cent) do not consider that aid covers their most important needs. Food, healthcare and education were identified by refugees as their primary unmet needs. This compares with 78 per cent of humanitarian staff, who believe that humanitarian aid and services adequately meet the needs and priorities of affected people. Provision of adequate education gives hope for the future (42 per cent), followed by security and peace (38 per cent) and adequate shelter and food (14 per cent). On the fairness of aid provision, refugees have mixed views, with 38 per cent saying that it does not go to those who need it most.

Orphans, people with disabilities, older persons and single mothers are perceived as the population groups most left out of aid programmes. Meanwhile, 92 per cent of staff consider that humanitarian programming adequately targets the most vulnerable population groups. The majority (56 per cent) of refugees surveyed do not see themselves as becoming more self-reliant. Respondents seem better informed about available services than in 2017, with almost half (46 per cent) saying they have the information they need. Yet, 43 per cent do not feel their views are considered in decision-making. A lack of beneficiary consultation, actions based on previous feedback given to aid providers, and a general opinion that there is inadequate respect for refugees and their rights are highlighted as obstacles to encouraging effective and meaningful refugee participation. In contrast, some 82 per cent of staff say they take refugees’ views into account when they make programme changes. Refugees remain positive about their ability to report abuse and mistreatment. Seventy per cent say they know how to make a complaint

Disease outbreaks

Ebola Preparedness and Response: At the end of the reporting period, Uganda remained EVD free. However, the risk of EVD importation remains very high. Contacts with Ebola cases travelling into Uganda have increased during the first quarter of 2019, with reports of people travelling to the DRC for burials of relatives and returning to Uganda without reporting their status. Community based surveillance for EVD cross-border activities between DRC and Uganda continues, including coordinated contact tracing.

A knowledge, attitude, practices and behaviour
(KAPB) survey on EVD was conducted by the Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) who assessed risk perceptions and beliefs of people living in the high-risk communities of Bundibugyo, Ntoroko, Kabarole, Bunyangabu, Kasese, Kanungu and Kisoro districts in Western and South Western Uganda. The majority of respondents (88.6 per cent) had heard about EVD. Community volunteers (77.6 per cent), as well as radio spot messages, announcements, talk shows, disc-jockey mentions (76 per cent) constitute the main sources of information. Many respondents (85.3 per cent) also expressed fear of contracting EVD. A sizeable number of respondents indicated that EVD is can be treated by local herbalists (58 per cent). Only 48 per cent of respondents believe that the DRC Ebola outbreak could be imported into Uganda. The survey reported high-levels of potential stigma and discriminatory attitudes towards Ebola. The EVD risk communication messaging and engagement by multiple agencies continues to be revised to place more emphasis on propagating correct information on the misconceived views related to EVD transmission, prevention and treatment methods.

Cholera: As of 5 February, 53 cumulative cases of cholera had been listed with three community deaths (CFR = 5.7 percent) since the disease was reported on 4 January in Kampala District. As of 20 February, Kampala had completed 14 days without any new cholera cases; a WHO requirement to declare an end to the outbreak.

Measles: Uganda continues to experience measles outbreaks. As of 28 February, a total of 139 suspected measles cases from 38 districts (nine are refugee hosting districts) were investigated by the Expanded Programme for Immunization (EPI) laboratory, of which 33 samples from 12 districts were confirmed positive for measles specific immunoglobulin. Further analyses confirmed 23 cases were children under five years. Frequent stock-outs of measles vaccines at the district and health facility levels, compounded with irregular outreach activities, are the underlying factors contributing to the measles outbreak. The basic causes are related to chronic underfunding of traditional vaccines, and stagnated funding to primary health care in the context of the rapid population growth.

South Sudan: UNICEF South Sudan Humanitarian Situation Report – February 2019

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Uganda

Highlights

  • UNICEF in collaboration with UNMISS and the National Disarmament,
    Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) Commission, successfully released 121 children associated with armed groups (49 girls; 72 boys) on 12 February. Based on the registration exercise of the Country Task Force for Monitoring and Reporting (CTFMR), around 200 children are to be released in and around Nzara, Yambio town, Lirangu and James Diko town and another 100 from Unity state by end of July 2019.

  • The Back to Learning campaign for 2019 was officially launched in Renk, Upper Nile, on 04 February and mobilized communities around the importance of child enrolment. UNICEF supported the Ministry of General Education and Instruction (MoGEI) in organizing the event which included performances of song, dance and poetry by children from local schools as well as speeches by the Minister, State Governor and State Minister for Education, UNICEF’s Representative and a member of the Education Donors’ Group.

Situation in Numbers

1.92 million
Internally displaced persons (IDPs)
(OCHA South Sudan Humanitarian Snapshot, February 2019)

2.28 million
South Sudanese refugees in neighbouring countries
(UNHCR Regional Portal, South Sudan Situation 28 February 2019)

5.25 million
South Sudanese who are severely food insecure
(January-March 2019 Projection, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification)

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

In February, UNICEF and its partners experienced both improvements and challenges in maintaining secure and predictable humanitarian access to women and children in various parts of the country. After fighting in earlier and mid 2018 in Unity, Jonglei and Western Bahr el Ghazal, state-level meetings between the SSPDF and pro-Machar SPLAiO have led to a temporary decrease in hostilities, which has expanded access in several states for UNICEF and its partners.

Road and river movements have improved in Jonglei and Upper Nile, facilitating UNICEF’s dry season prepositioning and delivery of IRRM supplies. UNICEF and partners continue to have predictable access to Greater Baggari, where an estimated 20,000 were recently displaced in the bush due to hostilities in the area. The force protection requirement has also been lifted from Wau to Raja and Wau to Yambio, easing the ability of UN humanitarian actors to respond in these areas. On the other hand, fighting continues in parts of Central and Western Equatoria between armed forces signed on to the R-ARCSS, and non-signatories from the South Sudan National Democratic Alliance (SSNDA). Fighting in Yei, Morobo, Lanya and Mukaya counties has displaced thousands of people and is limiting access to an estimated 15,000 people outside of Yei. This fighting is also hindering UNICEF’s ability to prepare frontline health facilities for potential Ebola cases and risk communication in the area.

UNICEF and partners also faced several restrictions of movement. An inter-agency assessment team was denied access to Lasu (Morobo County) by the SSPDF, preventing the verification of potential refugee returnees. In Raja, state security forces attempted to prevent an UNICEF-led inter-agency emergency response to Dolo, though the mission proceeded after successful access negotiations by UNICEF. An inter-agency assessment mission in Mundri East and West was also suspended at the suggestion of the National Salvation Front, who is present in the area.

Non-state civilian authorities under the pro-Machar SPLA-iO in Jonglei and Upper Nile also continue to impose excessive bureaucratic restrictions and interfere with operations. In Fangak, authorities continue to insist on direct payment of Personal Income Tax (PIT) on national staff despite these taxes having already been paid at the national level. Cattle raiding in Jonglei, Unity and Warrap –continues to negatively impact on access to vulnerable populations.

Looking forward, the trajectory of implementing the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan (R-ARCSS) over the coming months will have a significant impact on humanitarian access, especially access to women and children. If security continues to improve with the relatively successful implementation of the peace agreement, there is likely to be a further increase in refugee returnees. If not managed and supported effectively, this could lead to inter-communal or inter-ethnic tensions that could hinder access to assist with their resettlement. On the other hand, continued delays or the failure to implement key provisions of the agreement will likely lead to the continuation and or renewed hostilities in several parts of the country, which would have a disproportionate impact on women and children, who are already the most vulnerable and with limited resilience to further violence.

The ongoing fighting in parts of Central and Western Equatoria is likely to continue, limiting access for both UNICEF’s regular programmes and Ebola preparedness activities. Local disagreements over peace implementation are beginning to emerge, particularly in Western Equatoria, Western Bahr el Ghazal and Unity, which could also lead to the renewal of conflict and limited access.
The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis report conducted in January and February 2019 was released by the Government of South Sudan on 22 February. The report highlights that between February and April 2019, in the presence of humanitarian assistance, about 6.5 million people (57 per cent of the total population) are projected to be severely food insecure (IPC Phase 3 and above) out of which 45,000 are in Humanitarian Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). Comparing this projection to the same provided for 2018, the number of South Sudanese in IPC Phase 3 and above has increased 26 per cent in 2019. The food security situation in the country continues to deteriorate due to the cumulative effect of conflict-driven displacement, low crop production, economic crisis, climatic shocks and humanitarian access challenges.

Uganda: UNICEF Uganda Humanitarian Situation Report – February 2019

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Uganda

Highlights

  • UNICEF in collaboration with UNMISS and the National Disarmament,
    Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) Commission, successfully released 121 children associated with armed groups (49 girls; 72 boys) on 12 February. Based on the registration exercise of the Country Task Force for Monitoring and Reporting (CTFMR), around 200 children are to be released in and around Nzara, Yambio town, Lirangu and James Diko town and another 100 from Unity state by end of July 2019.

  • The Back to Learning campaign for 2019 was officially launched in Renk, Upper Nile, on 04 February and mobilized communities around the importance of child enrolment. UNICEF supported the Ministry of General Education and Instruction (MoGEI) in organizing the event which included performances of song, dance and poetry by children from local schools as well as speeches by the Minister, State Governor and State Minister for Education, UNICEF’s Representative and a member of the Education Donors’ Group.

Situation in Numbers

1.92 million
Internally displaced persons (IDPs)
(OCHA South Sudan Humanitarian Snapshot, February 2019)

2.28 million
South Sudanese refugees in neighbouring countries
(UNHCR Regional Portal, South Sudan Situation 28 February 2019)

5.25 million
South Sudanese who are severely food insecure
(January-March 2019 Projection, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification)

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

In February, UNICEF and its partners experienced both improvements and challenges in maintaining secure and predictable humanitarian access to women and children in various parts of the country. After fighting in earlier and mid 2018 in Unity, Jonglei and Western Bahr el Ghazal, state-level meetings between the SSPDF and pro-Machar SPLAiO have led to a temporary decrease in hostilities, which has expanded access in several states for UNICEF and its partners.

Road and river movements have improved in Jonglei and Upper Nile, facilitating UNICEF’s dry season prepositioning and delivery of IRRM supplies. UNICEF and partners continue to have predictable access to Greater Baggari, where an estimated 20,000 were recently displaced in the bush due to hostilities in the area. The force protection requirement has also been lifted from Wau to Raja and Wau to Yambio, easing the ability of UN humanitarian actors to respond in these areas. On the other hand, fighting continues in parts of Central and Western Equatoria between armed forces signed on to the R-ARCSS, and non-signatories from the South Sudan National Democratic Alliance (SSNDA). Fighting in Yei, Morobo, Lanya and Mukaya counties has displaced thousands of people and is limiting access to an estimated 15,000 people outside of Yei. This fighting is also hindering UNICEF’s ability to prepare frontline health facilities for potential Ebola cases and risk communication in the area.

UNICEF and partners also faced several restrictions of movement. An inter-agency assessment team was denied access to Lasu (Morobo County) by the SSPDF, preventing the verification of potential refugee returnees. In Raja, state security forces attempted to prevent an UNICEF-led inter-agency emergency response to Dolo, though the mission proceeded after successful access negotiations by UNICEF. An inter-agency assessment mission in Mundri East and West was also suspended at the suggestion of the National Salvation Front, who is present in the area.

Non-state civilian authorities under the pro-Machar SPLA-iO in Jonglei and Upper Nile also continue to impose excessive bureaucratic restrictions and interfere with operations. In Fangak, authorities continue to insist on direct payment of Personal Income Tax (PIT) on national staff despite these taxes having already been paid at the national level. Cattle raiding in Jonglei, Unity and Warrap –continues to negatively impact on access to vulnerable populations.

Looking forward, the trajectory of implementing the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan (R-ARCSS) over the coming months will have a significant impact on humanitarian access, especially access to women and children. If security continues to improve with the relatively successful implementation of the peace agreement, there is likely to be a further increase in refugee returnees. If not managed and supported effectively, this could lead to inter-communal or inter-ethnic tensions that could hinder access to assist with their resettlement. On the other hand, continued delays or the failure to implement key provisions of the agreement will likely lead to the continuation and or renewed hostilities in several parts of the country, which would have a disproportionate impact on women and children, who are already the most vulnerable and with limited resilience to further violence.

The ongoing fighting in parts of Central and Western Equatoria is likely to continue, limiting access for both UNICEF’s regular programmes and Ebola preparedness activities. Local disagreements over peace implementation are beginning to emerge, particularly in Western Equatoria, Western Bahr el Ghazal and Unity, which could also lead to the renewal of conflict and limited access.
The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis report conducted in January and February 2019 was released by the Government of South Sudan on 22 February. The report highlights that between February and April 2019, in the presence of humanitarian assistance, about 6.5 million people (57 per cent of the total population) are projected to be severely food insecure (IPC Phase 3 and above) out of which 45,000 are in Humanitarian Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). Comparing this projection to the same provided for 2018, the number of South Sudanese in IPC Phase 3 and above has increased 26 per cent in 2019. The food security situation in the country continues to deteriorate due to the cumulative effect of conflict-driven displacement, low crop production, economic crisis, climatic shocks and humanitarian access challenges.

World: Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA) Annual Report (Jan – Dec 2018)

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

The Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA) enables the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) to take rapid and effective action in response to food and agricultural threats and emergencies.

The Fund has three components:

(i) a working capital component to advance funds once a resource partner's commitment is secured toward the immediate procurement of inputs to protect livelihoods, restart agricultural activities or contribute to an immediate response to a crisis;

(ii) a revolving fund component to support FAO’s involvement in needs assessment and programme development, early establishment and reinforcement of emergency country team capacities, Level 3 emergency1 preparedness and response activities; and (iii) a programme component, which pools resources in support of a programme framework for large-scale emergencies or strategically complements ongoing programmes through the Agricultural Inputs Response Capacity (AIRC) window, as well as early actions triggered by corporate early warnings.

From its inception through 31 December 2018, SFERA received USD 230.4 million, of which USD 102.5 million were allocated to large-scale programmes (e.g. sudden onset disasters, the Sahel, Horn of Africa, El Niño response, highly pathogenic avian influenza, locust outbreaks, Fall army worm and protracted crises); USD 51.2 million were disbursed under the AIRC window; USD 27.8 million were used to set up or reinforce country office emergency response capacities and support needs assessments and programme formulation; USD 9.2 million were allocated to the Level 3 emergencies preparedness and response window; and USD 5.2 million were contributed to the early action window.

Since SFERA’s inception, USD 390.9 million have been advanced to fund immediate emergency projects, of which USD 36.1 million were advanced over the reporting period. Outstanding advances as at 31 December 2018 amounted to USD 7.6 million, while SFERA’s cash balance as at 31 December 2018 was USD 26.9 million.

South Sudan: South Sudan Situation Report, 25 February 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

CERF allocated US$2 million for Ebola preparedness activities
Measles outbreaks were confirmed in three counties, health...

South Sudan: South Sudan Health Cluster Bulletin 31, January 2019

Source: World Health Organization, Health Cluster
Country: South Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

Improving Health Access and Scaling up Responsiveness
In January 2019, mobile medical teams reached 1,643 beneficiaries in hard to reach through Inter-cluster Rapid R...

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