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Posts published in “Education”

Juba University female hostlers protest eviction order

Female hostlers at the University of Juba have protested an order to evict them from the institution hostels. On Friday, the Registrar of Administration and Finance, Kuorwel Kuai  Kuorwel, wrote a letter to the Dean of Students’ Affairs, Simon Mijok Mijak, instructing him to remove the students within 72 hours. According to the memo, the […]

The post Juba University female hostlers protest eviction order appeared first on Eye Radio.

Sudan: UNICEF Sudan Humanitarian Situation Report, December 2018 – Year End

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: South Sudan, Sudan

Highlights

  • From the 19th of December there have been civil protests which have also affected children. UNICEF is closely monitoring and regularly com-municating with Government authorities at Federal and State levels to raise our concerns and advocate for the protection of children.

  • UNICEF and its partners negotiated access for 1300 children from non-government-controlled areas in Jebel Marra to ensure they could sit for their Grade 8 exams in government-controlled territory, permitting chil-dren to continue their higher education.

  • Following the contained outbreak in Kassala, late 2018, the Red Sea State recorded increased incidences of Chikungunya. 835 health work-ers were trained to promote key behaviour changes in 70,187 house-holds and a mass media campaign targeted 207,000 individuals. UNICEF appreciates private sector partners ZAIN and MTN for their assistance in sharing SMS messages with affected communities.

  • In 2018, a total of 1,635,400 children under-five received health and nu-trition interventions including measles vaccinations, treatment for common childhood illnesses and Severe Acute Malnutrition and UNICEF’s Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) programme for moth-ers and caregivers.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs:

In 2018, Sudan continued to face protracted, complex and overlapping humanitarian challenges, driven by internal and external con-flicts and large-scale displacements, climatic and socioeconomic conditions that led to natural disasters, epidemics, food insecurity and malnutrition. An economic crisis has triggered a rise in the cost of living and eroded household purchasing power (annual infla-tion reached almost 70 percent by November). The situation was aggravated by shortages of fuel, bread, medicines and cash, im-pacting vulnerable children and families, including 5.5 million people in need of humanitarian assistance, and slowing humanitarian and development operations by all partners. Faced with this situation, Sudan witnessed multiple civil demonstrations that in some instances have necessitated deferment of UNICEF activities in the field.

Heavy rains and consequent flash floods also shaped the 2018 humanitarian situation and affected more than 195,000 people, dam-aging households and livelihoods in 15 out of Sudan’s 18 States. In August 2018, an outbreak of Chikungunya virus fever has been reported from Kassala state (Eastern Sudan). As of the 31st of December, a total of 26,892 suspected cases of Chikungunya fever were reported from 10 States with the bulk of cases reported from Kassala, and Red Sea States. Females represent 56 percent of the total reported cases while children under-5 years of age contributed to 5 percent of the total cases. The Acute Watery Diarrhoea (AWD) outbreak which first hit Sudan in 2016 and spread across Sudan’s 18 States in 2017 was somewhat contained in 2018. A total number of 134 cases of AWD were reported (53.9 percent of cases were female), all of whom were admitted and treated, with one reported death in Central Darfur. A measles outbreak was also reported, with Kassala, Gedaref and Northern States being the most affected. The nutrition situation amongst vulnerable groups in Sudan remained critical, with a high number of reported cases of acute malnutrition among South Sudanese refugees in White Nile, and a high number of cases among populations of newly accessible areas in Jebel Marra and Blue Nile.

Except for small pockets in Jebel Marra, the security situation in Darfur remained relatively stable in 2018. Some areas, Jebel Marra, the Nuba mountains in South Kordofan, and certain localities in Blue Nile remained mostly inaccessible despite some improvements to access. The number of registered refugees from South Sudan in Darfur currently stands at 150,326 as of December 20186. The inter-agency assessments conducted in areas such as Mistariha, Otash and Hissahissa camps, Rokero, Thur, East Jebel Marra, and Golo uncovered massive humanitarian needs in health, nutrition, education, shelter, WASH, food and protection areas. The insuffi-cient availability of funding for humanitarian actors, a need for timely issuance of visa and travel permits for humanitarian actors and the rapid processing of technical agreements were some of the concerns related to UNICEF’s ability to respond to humanitarian needs. The status quo of sporadic fighting during 2018 also meant that the numbers of displaced populations continue to create vulnerabilities, with the majority being children and women.

South Sudan: New batch of more than 60 children released from armed groups in Yambio

Source: UN Mission in South Sudan
Country: South Sudan

Sixty-eight children who were associated with armed groups were released today in Yambio, South Sudan, following an assessment and verification conducted by the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) Child Protection Unit and the national Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) commission.

This is the fourth batch of children released from the former South Sudan National Liberation Movement (SSNLM), who signed a peace agreement and agreed to integrate into government forces.

“The children that we are releasing today is part of the releases that we did last year,” said Oluku Andrew, South Sudan national coordinator for disarmament demobilization and reintegration of children. “The number may increase to about 100,” he went on. “This will not bring us to an end – if we finish with this 955 that we verified and register. There are some other locations that have reported about the presence of children [in armed forces].”

Anna Michael, UNICEF’s Child Protection Officer in Yambio explained what to be done after the release.

“From UNICEF’s side, we provide mainly the psycho-social support for these children, where we have established child-friendly spaces in the different communities where children come from, and social workers engage them in activities that help them to regain their childhood and be children – normal children in the communities,” she said.

She said UNICEF would also support the children’s formal and informal education.

“For the school aged children – those who are still fit for primary school, they go to the different primary schools around,” said Ms. Michael. “They enroll, and UNICEF supports the Ministry of Education to provide the required services to them at school,” she concluded.

She also said that UNICEF has different reintegration services for the children, which will be implemented with other humanitarian partners such as World Vision, World Food Programme, and the Catholic Medical Mission Board.

South Sudan: Education Cluster Assessment South Sudan, October 2018

Source: UN Children's Fund, Save the Children, Education Cluster
Country: South Sudan

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The following report has been developed by the Education Cluster Unit to fill a knowledge gap and to understand the state of primary school education in South Sudan. The Education Cluster conducted an assessment on the ground in South Sudan at both the County and School level with the support of a consultant in charge of providing technical expertise and facilitating the assessment. This exercise was necessitated by the continued state of insecurity and economic crisis that has been afflicting the nation since conflict began in December 2013.
The objectives of the assessment were mainly to:

  • provide education actors, humanitarian partners and donors with updated key indicators on the
    functioning of the education system so as to inform coordination and programming;
  • support proposal development and advocacy documents to increase financing for the sector;
  • enable prioritisation across geographic and thematic areas according to needs and risks;
  • And provide recommendations on most effective activities to resume education in a safe and
    sustained way.

The methodology used was primary data collection whereby questionnaires were administered to two sets of respondents: head teachers in sampled primary schools across the nation; and County Education Directors in all the county education level and secondary data. Simple random sampling
(randomization via excel sheet) was used to arrive at a sample of 400 schools. From the findings of the assessment, the study discovered that the major challenges plaguing South Sudan’s primary schools include:

  • the non-functionality of schools at the national level due to insecurity;
  • school closures;
  • the interruption of education days during the school year;
  • attacks on School;
  • limited accessibility to the schools and remoteness; poor school infrastructure,
  • limited availability of WASH facilities and soap in schools,
  • Low enrolment and attendance rates; and high drop-out rates.

The data collected through this needs assessment further found that the education sector has been negatively impacted, due to the food crisis in the country which has been exacerbated because of the lack of sufficient school feeding programs, in addition to the overall lack of adequate support from the authorities, inadequate teaching and learning materials, limited incentives due to the non-payment of teacher salaries, inadequate teacher training; and insufficient rehabilitation of school infrastructure.
The following are the main findings of the assessment:

1) School functionality
According to the assessment data, 80.4% of schools (as compared to 59% in the 2017 assessment) were functional representing a 21.4% increase compared to 2017. Insecurity, departure of teachers to safe areas and/ getting other jobs and students deserting schools, the in-consistency in payment of teachers incentives,’ and insufficient teaching and learning materials were found to be the major reasons for school closures across the country.

2) Enrolment, attendance and dropping out
There was an increase in enrolment rates of more than 10 percent compared to what was reported in the 2017 assessment nationally. Across the Counties, 60 percent of enrolled
students are boys while girls are 40 percent. Nationally, data collected from the sampled schools
gives a ratio of 57:43 for boys and girls respectively, only slightly different from the County data.
Reasons for dropping out and non-attendance are very similar across the regions and dominated by lack of food; However, there are more specific reasons for girls’ dropout this include i) marriage, ii) pregnancy and iii) domestic duties.

3) Teachers
On average, 30 percent of the teachers were absent/ not in school on the day/date of the assessment in their schools nationally. The main reason for teachers’ absenteeism was reported as the lack of (inconsistency) or delayed payment of salaries/incentives. On average, government and nongovernment teachers reported having received three months’ salaries/incentives at the time of assessment, whereas they should have received 9 months’ salaries or incentives from the beginning of the year. Head teachers reported that 42 percent of the teachers had no access to the full set of textbooks, required for teaching. 66 percent of those assessed were non-government teachers.

World: L’UNICEF a besoin de 3,9 milliards de dollars cette année pour assister 41 millions d’enfants à travers le monde

Source: UN News Service
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World, Yemen

Des millions d’enfants vivant dans des pays touchés par des conflits ou des catastrophes n’ont pas accès à des services essentiels de protection de l’enfance, une situation qui met en péril leur sécurité, leur bien-être et leur avenir, a prévenu mardi l’UNICEF en lançant un appel de fonds de 3,9 milliards de dollars en appui à ses efforts pour venir en aide aux enfants pris dans des crises humanitaires.

Cet argent doit pour permettre à 41 millions d’enfants d’avoir accès à de l’eau salubre ainsi qu’à des services de nutrition, d’éducation, de santé et de protection dans 59 pays à travers le monde, a précisé l’UNICEF dans un communiqué de presse.

Les cinq appels de fonds individuels les plus importants concernent les réfugiés syriens et leurs communautés d’accueil en Égypte, en Jordanie, au Liban, en Iraq et en Turquie (904 millions de dollars), le Yémen (542,3 millions de dollars), la République démocratique du Congo (326,1 millions de dollars), la Syrie (319,8 millions de dollars) et le Soudan du Sud (179,2 millions de dollars).

« Aujourd’hui, des millions d’enfants frappés par des conflits ou des catastrophes sont confrontés à une violence, à une détresse et à des traumatismes d’une ampleur effroyable », déplore la Directrice générale de l’UNICEF, Henrietta Fore. « Sans espaces sûrs dans lesquels jouer en sécurité et sans possibilité de retrouver leur famille et de recevoir un soutien psychosocial, les enfants n’ont aucune chance de panser les blessures psychologiques infligées par la guerre ».

L'UNICEF estime que plus de 34 millions d’enfants touchés par des conflits ou des catastrophes n’ont pas accès à des services de protection de l’enfance, parmi lesquels 6,6 millions d’enfants au Yémen, 5,5 millions d’enfants en Syrie et 4 millions d’enfants en République démocratique du Congo (RDC). Ces services comprennent l’ensemble des efforts visant à prévenir et à traiter la maltraitance, la négligence, l’exploitation, les traumatismes et la violence

Des contraintes budgétaires

L’UNICEF s’attache également à garantir que la protection de l’enfance occupe une place centrale dans l’ensemble de ses programmes humanitaires, notamment dans les domaines de l’eau, de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène et de l’éducation, en identifiant, atténuant et éliminant les dangers qui menacent la sécurité et le bien-être des enfants.

Cependant, les contraintes budgétaires conjuguées à d’autres obstacles, dont le mépris grandissant des parties belligérantes à l’égard du droit humanitaire international et le refus de laisser passer l’aide humanitaire, limitent fortement la capacité des organismes d’aide humanitaire à protéger les enfants. Ainsi, en 2018, l’UNICEF n’a reçu qu’un tiers des 21 millions de dollars nécessaires pour déployer ses programmes de protection de l’enfance en RDC et n’a pas pu réunir près d’un cinquième du financement demandé pour les enfants syriens.

« Il est essentiel de fournir à ces enfants le soutien dont ils ont besoin », affirme Manuel Fontaine, Directeur des programmes d’urgence de l’UNICEF. « La communauté internationale doit s’engager à appuyer les efforts de protection des enfants pris dans des situations d’urgence. »

L’année 2019 marque le 30e anniversaire de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et le 70e anniversaire des Conventions de Genève. Pourtant, au cours des trois dernières décennies, il n’y a jamais eu autant de pays impliqués dans des conflits internes ou internationaux, une situation qui menace la sécurité et le bien-être de millions d’enfants.

World: UNICEF Action humanitaire pour les enfants en 2019 – Vue d’ensemble

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World, Yemen

L’UNICEF lance un appel de 3,9 milliards de dollars É.-U. afin d’apporter une aide humanitaire d’urgence à 41 millions d’enfants touchés par des conflits ou des catastrophes

Des millions d’enfants n’ont pas accès à des services essentiels de protection de l’enfance

GENÈVE/NEW YORK, le 29 janvier 2019 – Des millions d’enfants vivant dans des pays touchés par des conflits ou des catastrophes n’ont pas accès à des services essentiels de protection de l’enfance, une situation qui met en péril leur sécurité, leur bien-être et leur avenir, alerte aujourd’hui l’UNICEF en lançant un appel de 3,9 milliards de dollars É.-U. en appui à ses efforts pour venir en aide aux enfants pris dans des crises humanitaires.

Le rapport Action humanitaire pour les enfants de l’UNICEF établit le montant de l’appel de fonds humanitaires de l’organisation ainsi que la nature des efforts à accomplir pour permettre à 41 millions d’enfants d’avoir accès à de l’eau salubre ainsi qu’à des services de nutrition, d’éducation, de santé et de protection dans 59 pays à travers le monde. Le financement des programmes de protection de l’enfance représente 358 millions de dollars É-U. de l’appel global. Sur cette somme, près de 121 millions de dollars É.-U. seront affectés aux services visant à protéger les enfants victimes de la crise en Syrie.

« Aujourd’hui, des millions d’enfants frappés par des conflits ou des catastrophes sont confrontés à une violence, à une détresse et à des traumatismes d’une ampleur effroyable », déplore Henrietta Fore, Directrice générale de l’UNICEF. « Nul ne peut sous-estimer l’importance du travail que nous accomplissons dans le domaine de la protection de l’enfance. Sans espaces sûrs dans lesquels jouer en sécurité et sans possibilité de retrouver leur famille et de recevoir un soutien psychosocial, les enfants n’ont aucune chance de panser les blessures psychologiques infligées par la guerre. »

L’UNICEF estime que plus de 34 millions d’enfants touchés par des conflits ou des catastrophes n’ont pas accès à des services de protection de l’enfance, parmi lesquels 6,6 millions d’enfants au Yémen, 5,5 millions d’enfants en Syrie et 4 millions d’enfants en République démocratique du Congo (RDC). Ces services comprennent l’ensemble des efforts visant à prévenir et à traiter la maltraitance, la négligence, l’exploitation, les traumatismes et la violence.

L’UNICEF s’attache également à garantir que la protection de l’enfance occupe une place centrale dans l’ensemble de ses programmes humanitaires, notamment dans les domaines de l’eau, de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène et de l’éducation, en identifiant, atténuant et éliminant les dangers qui menacent la sécurité et le bien-être des enfants.

Cependant, les contraintes budgétaires conjuguées à d’autres obstacles, dont le mépris grandissant des parties belligérantes à l’égard du droit humanitaire international et le refus de laisser passer l’aide humanitaire, limitent fortement la capacité des organismes d’aide humanitaire à protéger les enfants. Ainsi, en 2018, l’UNICEF n’a reçu qu’un tiers des 21 millions de dollars É.-U. nécessaires pour déployer ses programmes de protection de l’enfance en RDC et n’a pas pu réunir près d’un cinquième du financement demandé pour les enfants syriens.

« Il est essentiel de fournir à ces enfants le soutien dont ils ont besoin. Cependant, en l’absence d’une action internationale de grande envergure et durable, beaucoup d’enfants continueront d’en être privés », affirme Manuel Fontaine, Directeur des programmes d’urgence de l’UNICEF. « La communauté internationale doit s’engager à appuyer les efforts de protection des enfants pris dans des situations d’urgence. »

L’année 2019 marque le 30e anniversaire de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et le 70e anniversaire des Conventions de Genève. Pourtant, au cours des trois dernières décennies, il n’y a jamais eu autant de pays impliqués dans des conflits internes ou internationaux, une situation qui menace la sécurité et le bien-être de millions d’enfants.

Cet appel survient un mois après la déclaration de l’UNICEF sur l’échec du monde à protéger les enfants vivant dans des régions touchées par des conflits et sur les conséquences catastrophiques de cet échec. Les enfants qui sont exposés de manière prolongée à la violence ou à un conflit, en particulier à un jeune âge, risquent de développer une anxiété nocive. Or, sans un soutien approprié, cette anxiété est susceptible d’avoir des retombées dramatiques sur leur développement cognitif, social et affectif à long terme. Certains enfants éprouvés par la guerre, les déplacements et d’autres événements traumatiques, tels que la violence sexuelle ou la violence liée au genre, ont absolument besoin de recevoir des soins spécialisés pour faire face et se relever.

Les cinq appels individuels les plus importants concernent les réfugiés syriens et leurs communautés d’accueil en Égypte, en Jordanie, au Liban, en Iraq et en Turquie (904 millions de dollars É.-U.), le Yémen (542,3 millions de dollars É.-U.), la République démocratique du Congo (326,1 millions de dollars É.-U.), la Syrie (319,8 millions de dollars É.-U.) et le Soudan du Sud (179,2 millions de dollars É.-U.).

#####

Note aux rédactions :

En 2019, toutes crises confondues, l’UNICEF, avec l’appui de ses partenaires, vise à :

  • Apporter un soutien psychosocial à 4 millions d’enfants et de personnes qui en ont la charge ;
  • Permettre à près de 43 millions de personnes d’avoir accès à une eau salubre ;
  • Fournir à 10,1 millions d’enfants une éducation de base formelle ou non formelle ;
  • Vacciner 10,3 millions d’enfants contre la rougeole ;
  • Traiter 4,2 millions d’enfants atteints de malnutrition aiguë sévère.

Au cours des 10 premiers mois de l’année 2018, grâce au soutien de l’UNICEF :

  • 3,1 millions d’enfants et de personnes qui en ont la charge ont bénéficié d’un soutien psychosocial ;
  • 35,3 millions de personnes ont eu accès à une eau salubre ;
  • 5,9 millions d’enfants ont eu accès à une certaine forme d’éducation ;
  • 4,7 millions d’enfants ont été vaccinés contre la rougeole ;
  • 2,6 millions d’enfants ont été traités pour malnutrition aiguë sévère.

À propos de l’UNICEF

L’UNICEF travaille dans certains des endroits les plus inhospitaliers du monde pour atteindre les enfants les plus défavorisés. Dans 190 pays et territoires, nous travaillons pour chaque enfant, chaque jour, afin de construire un monde meilleur pour tous.

Pour en savoir plus sur l’UNICEF et son action, veuillez consulter le site : www.unicef.org/fr.

Suivez-nous sur Twitter et Facebook

Contacts presse

Joe English
UNICEF New York
Tél: +1 917 893 0692

Adresse électronique:

jenglish@unicef.org

World: UNICEF solicita 3.900 millones de dólares en ayuda de emergencia para 41 millones de niños afectados por conflictos o desastres naturales

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

Millones de niños carecen de acceso a los servicios esenciales de protección de la infancia.

GINEBRA/NUEVA YORK, 29 de enero de 2019 – Millones de niños que viven en países afectados por conflictos y desastres carecen de acceso a servicios vitales de protección de la infancia, lo que pone en peligro su seguridad, su bienestar y su futuro, advirtió hoy UNICEF en su llamamiento de 3.900 millones de dólares para apoyar su labor en favor de la infancia en las crisis humanitarias.

En la publicación Acción Humanitaria para la Infancia, UNICEF presenta el llamamiento y las medidas de la organización para brindar acceso al agua potable, la nutrición, la educación, la salud y la protección a 41 millones de niños de 59 países en 2019. La financiación de los programas de protección de la infancia representa 385 millones de dólares del llamamiento general, incluidos casi 121 millones de dólares para los servicios de protección de los niños afectados por la crisis de Siria.

“Hoy en día, millones de niños que viven en situaciones de conflicto o desastre sufren niveles horribles de violencia que les provocan sufrimientos y traumas”, dijo Henrietta Fore, Directora Ejecutiva de UNICEF. “No es posible exagerar las consecuencias que tiene nuestro trabajo para la protección de la infancia. Cuando los niños no disponen de lugares seguros para jugar, cuando no pueden reunirse con sus familias, cuando no reciben apoyo psicosocial, no pueden curarse de las cicatrices invisibles que provoca la guerra”.

UNICEF calcula que más de 34 millones de niños que viven en situaciones de conflicto y desastre carecen de acceso a servicios de protección de la infancia, entre ellos 6,6 millones de niños en Yemen, 5,5 millones en Siria y 4 millones en la República Democrática del Congo. Los servicios de protección de la infancia incluyen todas las medidas destinadas a prevenir y responder al abuso, la negligencia, la explotación, el trauma y la violencia.

UNICEF también trabaja para garantizar que la protección de la infancia sea un elemento central de todos sus programas humanitarios –entre ellos los de agua, saneamiento, higiene y educación– mediante el reconocimiento, la mitigación y la eliminación de las amenazas que pesan sobre la seguridad y el bienestar de los niños.

Sin embargo, las limitaciones en la financiación, así como otros problemas como el creciente desprecio de las partes beligerantes por el derecho internacional humanitario y la denegación del acceso a la ayuda, hacen que la capacidad de los organismos de humanitarios para proteger a los niños sea muy limitada. En la República Democrática del Congo, por ejemplo, UNICEF recibió sólo una tercera parte de los 21 millones de dólares necesarios para los programas de protección de la infancia en 2018, y no ha logrado reunir aun casi una quinta parte de los fondos destinados a la protección de los niños sirios.

“Proporcionar a estos niños el apoyo que necesitan es fundamental, pero si no se lleva a cabo una acción internacional considerable y sostenida, muchos de ellos continuarán cayendo en el olvido”, dijo Manuel Fontaine, Director de Programas de Emergencia de UNICEF. “La comunidad internacional debe comprometerse a apoyar la protección de la infancia en situaciones de emergencia”.

El año 2019 marca el 30º aniversario de la histórica Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño y el 70º aniversario de los Convenios de Ginebra; sin embargo, hoy en día hay más países envueltos en conflictos internos o internacionales que en ningún otro momento de las últimas tres décadas, lo que representa una amenaza para la seguridad y el bienestar de millones de niños.

El llamamiento de UNICEF se produce un mes después de que la organización dedicada a la infancia afirmara que el mundo no está protegiendo a los niños que viven en situaciones de conflicto en todo el mundo, con consecuencias catastróficas. Los niños que están continuamente expuestos a la violencia o al conflicto, especialmente a una edad temprana, corren el riesgo de vivir en un estado de estrés tóxico, una condición que, sin el apoyo adecuado, puede tener consecuencias negativas para su desarrollo cognitivo, social y emocional a lo largo de toda su vida. Algunos niños afectados por la guerra, el desplazamiento y otros acontecimientos traumáticos, como la violencia sexual y la violencia basada en el género, necesitan atención especializada que les ayude a sobrellevar la situación y a recuperarse.

Los cinco mayores llamamientos individuales incluyen a los refugiados sirios y a las comunidades de acogida de Egipto, Jordania, Líbano, Iraq y Turquía (904 millones de dólares); a Yemen (542,3 millones de dólares); a la República Democrática del Congo (326,1 millones de dólares); a Siria (319,8 millones de dólares) y a Sudán del Sur (179,2 millones de dólares).

Notas para los editores:

En total, UNICEF, en colaboración con sus aliados, aspira a lograr lo siguiente:

  • Proporcionar a 4 millones de niños y cuidadores acceso a apoyo psicosocial;
  • Proporcionar a casi 43 millones de personas acceso al agua potable;
  • Brindar educación básica formal o no formal a 10,1 millones de niños;
  • Inmunizar a 10,3 millones de niños contra el sarampión;
  • Tratar a 4,2 millones de niños con desnutrición aguda grave.

En los primeros 10 meses de 2018, como resultado del apoyo de UNICEF:

  • 3,1 millones de niños y cuidadores recibieron apoyo psicosocial;
  • 35,3 millones de personas tuvieron acceso al agua potable;
  • 5,9 millones de niños tuvieron acceso a algún tipo de educación;
  • 4,7 millones de niños recibieron la vacuna contra el sarampión;
  • 2,6 millones de niños recibieron tratamiento para la desnutrición aguda grave.

Hay fotos y materiales multimedia disponibles para su descarga aquí: https://weshare.unicef.org/Package/2AMZIF3M0QD6

_Acción Humanitaria para la Infancia 2019 _y los llamamientos individuales pueden consultarse en: https://www.unicef.org/appeals/

Para obtener más información o para solicitar entrevistas, sírvase dirigirse a:
Christopher Tidey, UNICEF Nueva York, Tel: +1 917 340 3017, ctidey@unicef.org
Joe English, UNICEF Nueva York, Tel: +1 917 893 0692, jenglish@unicef.org
Marixie Mercado, UNICEF Ginebra, +41 79 559 7172, mmercado@unicef.org

Contactos de prensa
Marisol Quintero
Especialista Regional de Comunicación
UNICEF América Latina y el Caribe
Teléfono: +507 3017484
Teléfono: +507 65692718
Correo electrónico:
mquintero@unicef.org

South Sudan: Humanitarian Action for Children 2019 – South Sudan

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: South Sudan

While the signing of a peace agreement in September 2018 formally put an end to the conflict in South Sudan, the humanitarian situation remains dire.

The multidimensional crisis is characterized by continued violence, severe food and nutrition insecurity, economic upheaval and disease outbreaks. Over 4.5 million people have been uprooted, including 2 million people who are internally displaced and 2.5 million people who have taken refuge in neighbouring countries.

An estimated 1.5 million people are located in areas with extremely limited humanitarian access due to insecurity and operational interference. By early 2019, an estimated 5.2 million people will be experiencing crisis levels (or worse) of acute food insecurity,4 and more than 220,700 children under 5 years will suffer from severe acute malnutrition (SAM).

Malaria remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Since 2014, the United Nations has verified 2,700 incidents of grave violations affecting over 81,000 children. Gender-based violence is occurring at an alarming rate, with some 2,300 incidents reported to service providers during the first half of 2018, mostly affecting women and girls. Over 2.2 million children across South Sudan are now out of school and 6 million people require water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services.

Humanitarian strategy

In 2019, UNICEF will provide life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan through a timely and effective integrated package of nutrition, health, WASH, child protection and education services delivered through interconnected, complementary responses. To ensure that support has a wide reach, services will be delivered through static operations, direct outreach and rapid response modalities. UNICEF’s operations will be led by its 13 field offices11 to enable wide coverage and quality programming across the country. UNICEF’s leadership of the nutrition and WASH clusters and child protection area of responsibility and its co-leadership of the education cluster will enable strategic planning, coordinated response, capacity building of partners and advocacy both at the national and state levels.

Emergency cash programming will be implemented through UNICEF’s strong existing collaborations and inter-agency mechanisms such as the Cash Working Group. The response will expand in 2019 to include recovery and resilience programming in selected field locations, including basic social service delivery, community-based system strengthening and accountability to affected populations. UNICEF will invest in increasing the localization of aid in South Sudan through capacity building and targeted resource allocation. Following the peace deal, UNICEF will also further invest in building the capacities of central and sub-national state authorities.

Results from 2018

As of 31 October 2018, UNICEF had US$141.5 million available against the US$183.3 million appeal (77 per cent funded).12 These funds allowed UNICEF to deliver assistance to 2.4 million people,13 including 1.8 million children.14 In 2018, UNICEF reached 82 per cent of targeted children with SAM treatment, including in highly inaccessible locations. In malaria prevention, the distribution of bed nets exceeded the target by 45 per cent due to expanded programme coverage. Eighty-two per cent of targeted children were immunized against measles.15 While 62 per cent of the target population gained access to safe water, only 51 per cent are accessing appropriate sanitation facilities due to cultural barriers and under-funding. Psychosocial support provided by UNICEF and partners reached 89 per cent of targeted children.

Gains were made in girls’ access to education, with girls making up 44 per cent of the 559,000 children reached with education-in-emergencies services.
The education target was exceeded by 12 per cent thanks to the sustained availability of funding. Forty-five Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism missions were deployed to hard-toreach locations, reaching over 533,000 people, including 109,000 children under 5 years. The year’s results were achieved with partners, including state authorities, through static, outreach and mobile interventions.

Uganda: Humanitarian Action for Children 2019 – Uganda

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Uganda

Due to ongoing conflict, poverty and food insecurity in neighbouring countries,
Uganda is expected to receive over 1 million South Sudanese, 600,000 Congolese and 40,000 Burundian refugees by 2020.

Children make up 60 per cent of refugee and host community populations, and many lack access to essential services and are facing serious protection risks.

More than half of all primary-level children and over 90 per cent of secondary-level children are out of school, and 22 per cent of children in integrated refugee settlements are enrolled in grades lower than expected for their age.

The global acute malnutrition rate is above 10 per cent and over 40 per cent of women and children are anaemic. Water deprivation affects 62 per cent of those living in host communities and 69 per cent of refugees living in Uganda for more than five years, and water resource management in refugee settlements is disconnected from humanitarian action. Nearly one third of refugee settlement households lack single family latrines. For children and women living with HIV, access to and utilization of HIV prevention, care and treatment are inadequate. The country is struggling to manage disease outbreaks, including cholera, and the risk of an Ebola outbreak remains significant.

Humanitarian strategy

UNICEF supports the implementation of durable solutions to chronic displacement in Uganda in line with the country’s Refugees and Host Population Empowerment Strategic Framework,
Settlement Transformation Agenda and Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework. UNICEF will continue to support the Government to adapt its nutrition, health, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), child protection, education and social protection systems to humanitarian situations. Using a decentralized approach, UNICEF will strengthen its humanitarian response, including by localizing capacity building, monitoring and reporting and procuring essential equipment and supplies.

Community-based support will improve the delivery of targeted protection and basic services for affected children and adolescents. UNICEF will work with the Government and partners at the national and sub-national levels to strengthen multi-year planning processes to leverage domestic and international resources for at-risk communities. Government contingency planning and response efforts will be supported to mitigate the effects of disease outbreaks and natural disasters.

In high-risk communities, applying and scaling up existing civic engagement platforms, such as U-report, will promote accountability to affected populations, build linkages between communities and local governments and guide responsive district and sub-district planning and budgeting. Gender, HIV and AIDS, conflict sensitivity and communication for development programming will be mainstreamed into all interventions.

Results from 2018

As of 31 October 2018, UNICEF had US$22.5 million available against the US$66.1 million 2018 appeal (33 per cent funded). UNICEF supported integrated refugee/host community planning for education, health and nutrition and strengthened the coordination of basic service sectors in the refugee response.

Nutrition and HIV and AIDS results were higher than expected considering the limited funding available, primarily due to UNICEF’s investment of core and other resources in key services. High-risk districts successfully maintained a cure rate above 75 per cent for malnourished children, but a change in the intervention focus from district-wide to the sub-district level resulted in low coverage of vitamin A supplementation. Fourteen motorized water systems enabled access to water for 93 per cent of the target population.

UNICEF supported the Ministry of Health to strengthen its preparedness and response to the threat of Ebola from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and use communication for development interventions to contain cholera outbreaks.

The reduced number of refugees in 2018 meant that fewer unaccompanied and separated children received protection services, including alternate care and psychosocial support. The education response was 62 per cent funded, but unanticipated delays in replicating an approved multipurpose education facility limited education results.

World: Humanitarian Action for Children 2019 – Eastern and Southern Africa

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zimbabwe

Eastern and Southern Africa

The Eastern and Southern Africa region is affected by recurrent disasters that are undermining the hard-fought development gains of recent years and resulting in major social and economic setbacks. More than 30 million people, including 17 million children (45 per cent) are in need of humanitarian assistance due to climate-related shocks, health emergencies and displacement. Droughts, floods and cyclones have left more than 27 million people food insecure. The El Niño-related drought developing in southern Africa is affecting more than 8 million people in the six most-affected countries,3 and flooding will likely increase the burdens on vulnerable drought-affected communities. In addition, populations in Comoros, Madagascar and Mozambique remain at risk due to seasonal cyclones and tropical storms. The public health risk in the region is also growing, with 10 out of the 21 countries reporting some 35,000 cases of cholera and acute watery diarrhoea and 420 deaths — a 1.2 per cent case fatality rate — since the beginning of 2018. The Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in the North Kivu and Ituri provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to threaten neighbouring countries. Other health risks include outbreaks of yellow fever in Ethiopia, plague in Madagascar and typhoid fever in Zimbabwe. The situation in South Sudan remains catastrophic for children, with more than 2.1 million people seeking refuge in neighbouring countries, including 1.3 million children on the move.6 The political instability in Burundi and the Democratic Republic of the Congo has led to growing humanitarian needs for children and their families, who have been forced to flee into neighbouring countries.

Regional humanitarian strategy

Humanitarian funds channelled through the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office are strategically allocated to facilitate response to children’s most pressing needs, across the region. These funds also enable countries to enhance their preparedness and response to emergencies, particularly those emergencies that require a multi-country, integrated and immediate response, and those countries that are likely to require new humanitarian programming in 2019 but without dedicated appeals in Humanitarian Action for Children 2019. This regional appeal focuses on four components. The first is to support multi-country actions for children and women who are displaced and have crossed borders as refugees or migrants by providing technical assistance to governments and other service providers on child protection case management, family tracing and reunification and alternative care for unaccompanied and separated children, as well as basic services for health, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), nutrition and education. This also includes facilitating the generation and dissemination of child-focused knowledge products, tools and guidance for effective programme monitoring and advocacy. The second is to support climate-induced disaster response, including to drought- and flood-affected countries, through the delivery of life-saving interventions for children, in partnership with national and international actors. This component will use a multi-sectoral and integrated approach in key sectors, including WASH, nutrition, education and health, and support sector coordination. The third is to support preparedness and response to health emergencies by providing clean water supply, household sanitation and hygiene and WASH in schools and health facilities, and contribute to strengthening national systems to respond to Ebola, should the outbreak spread from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The fourth is to provide regional technical assistance, quality assurance and oversight to support countries to achieve humanitarian results in nutrition, health, WASH, child protection, education, HIV and AIDS, social protection and communication for development. The Regional Office will also facilitate country collaboration across borders to ensure that assistance is provided to populations in vulnerable border regions and harmonized across country offices. UNICEF will also support capacity building for effective preparedness for, response to and recovery from humanitarian situations, and emergency preparedness and response training, including on humanitarian performance monitoring and sector-specific humanitarian action. The Regional Office will also support country offices to maintain preparedness by meeting the minimum preparedness standards set out in the Emergency Preparedness Platform.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: République démocratique du Congo: 2018 Aperçu des besoins humanitaires (oct 2018)

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, Zambia

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