Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Flood”

Uganda: UNICEF Uganda Humanitarian Annual Situation Report – January – December 2018

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda

Highlights

• In 2018, Uganda responded to several crises including the refugee influx from DRC, Burundi and South Sudan, disease outbreaks such as cholera, and flooding in Bududa, Eastern Uganda.

• Those most affected by emergencies in Uganda were women and children. Sixty per cent of refugees and host communities were children still in need of essential services for their survival, development and well-being.

• With UNICEF support, 25,100 children were treated for severe acute malnutrition; and 475,700 children aged 6 months to 15 years were vaccinated against measles in refugee hosting districts. While 4,700 unaccompanied and separated children benefitted from individual support and alternative care services.

• Since the start of the Ebola outbreak in August, in neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), UNICEF has been involved in Ebola prevention and preparedness efforts with the Ministry of Health and partners

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

In 2018, the Government of Uganda with support from UNICEF and other partners responded to several humanitarian crises including the refugee influx from DRC, Burundi and South Sudan, disease outbreaks such as cholera, the threat of EVD from neighbouring DRC, and flooding in Bududa, Eastern Uganda.

Refugees

Uganda is home to over 1.2 million refugees. A verification exercise conducted by the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) and UNHCR in 2018 showed that over 789,099 refugees originated from South Sudan; 312,699 from DRC; 34,981 from Burundi; and over 54,000 from Somalia, Rwanda and other countries.

Children in refugee settlements in Uganda continue to be at risk of abuse, neglect, violence and exploitation. Case management reports from the field revealed that the types of violence against children include separation from caregivers/families, psychosocial distress, sexual and gender-based violence, physical violence, child labour and neglect. New arrivals mainly children continued to display symptoms of distress caused by witnessing violence and conflict in their countries of origin. These protection concerns require adequate and timely provision of critical child protection services.

In 2018, Uganda’s Ministry of Education and Sports with support from partners launched the Education Response Plan for Refugees and Host Communities (ERP) as a means to facilitate the integration of the planning of education services to benefit refugee children and host communities. The increasing number of refugees put pressure on Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres, primary and secondary schools, many of which already face challenges of poor infrastructure and insufficient teachers. For example, in Yumbe district, the school-aged population has more than doubled since early 2016. As a result, many children, adolescents and youth in refugee settlements and host communities are not able to obtain an education, either because they have missed the opportunity for schooling due to the protracted crisis and are too old to join the formal schools, or do not have the necessary examination certificates. Education interventions are particularly important to build social cohesion among refugees and between refugees and host communities. Life skills interventions, accelerated learning programmes and vocational training are essential opportunities for adolescents and young people.

The OPM, UNHCR and REACH Initiative, conducted a joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment of refugees and host communities in Uganda. The assessment reported high levels of food insecurity among refugees.1 The average Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) (WHZ < -2 SD) increased from 7.2 per cent in 2016 to 9.5 per cent in 2017; above the WHO emergency threshold. Stunting was also above the WHO emergency threshold of 20 per cent across all settlements in the South West. Across all settlements, women and children suffered from anaemia, which was above the WHO emergency threshold of 40 per cent. There is need to intensify efforts to address micronutrient deficiency, GAM, and stunting to reduce the current burden of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) across the refugee hosting districts. According to the Lancet series, about 20 per cent of all child morbidity and mortality can be averted with appropriate infant and young child feeding practices of breast and complementary feeding and these will continue to be prioritised in 2019.

With an increasing refugee population and anticipated refugee influxes through to 2020, the capacity and resources of primary healthcare institutions remain at a constant risk of being overstretched. In particular, refugees living in urban areas and outside the settlements access government health facilities that have not planned for additional patient caseload, leading to increased workload on health workers, frequent shortage of medicines and out-of-pocket medication expenditures by both refugee and host communities during stock-out periods2 .

On average, refugee hosting sub-counties accessed 16 litres of water per person per day (lpd). According to sector reports, supply was inequitably distributed between settlement, hosting populations and districts. Refugee and host populations from West Nile had the highest lpd (average 17.5 lpd for host community, 18.7 litres for refugees). Households of refugees from DRC and Burundi in the southwest region accessed 15 lpd or less (68 per cent for host community, 74 per cent for refugees) and 10 lpd or less (38 per cent for host community, 49 per cent for refugees) respectively. Seventy nine per cent of households in host community and amongst refugees own a family latrine. The unavailability of materials for construction of family latrines coupled with low levels of community participation to shift from communal to family latrines, especially amongst South Sudanese refugees, is hindering efforts to ensure all households own a latrine.

Child poverty and deprivation in refugee settings

The first study to apply a consensual approach to measuring poverty3 and deprivation in emergency situations in the country and globally – Child Poverty and Deprivation in Refugee Hosting Areas – was launched in June 2018. The study4 assessed child poverty, deprivation and social service delivery and provided unprecedented evidence on the situation and vulnerability of refugees in Uganda, including urban refugees in Kampala, and that of host communities in the main refugee-hosting regions. The analysis identified the determinants of social service insufficiency and provided practical recommendations on how to manage social service delivery equitably for both refugees and host communities. The evidence highlighted that while refugee children tend to be more deprived of socially perceived necessities, deprivation among refugees tends to reduce over time. Within five years of residence, deprivation rates among refugees were on a par with those of host communities; the reason being that levels of deprivation among host communities are already high. As such, the evidence reiterates the urgent need to facilitate integration of services provided for both host and refugees and special focus is for refugee-hosting districts. More details on the report can be accessed on https://www.unicef.org/uganda/ChildPovertyRefugees-FINAL-Lores.pdf

Disease outbreaks

Throughout 2018, refugee producing countries neighbouring Uganda and refugee-hosting areas inside Uganda remained vulnerable to communicable disease outbreaks due to cross border movement, congestion, inadequate sanitation and geographic location of settlement necessitating preparedness and response for disease outbreaks especially at district and local level.

Cholera: In 2018, the Ministry of Health (MOH) with support from UNICEF and other humanitarian partners responded to Cholera outbreaks in eleven districts with a total of 2,699 cumulative cases and Case Fatality Rate (CFR) of 2.22 per cent which is above the WHO threshold. Majority of the cases were refugees from DRC who imported the outbreak Ituri (DRC), other outbreaks to note are Amudat and Bulambuli that were believed to be associated with cross border engagements among the Pokot and Karamojong in North Eastern Uganda.The re-emergence of cholera in Kampala city in December, two months after controlling an earlier outbreak, has been attributed to risk factors of poor sanitation and lack of clean water. There is need to address the risk factors associated with WASH in addition to risk communication and social mobilization for behaviour change.

Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF): Uganda experienced sporadic cases of CCHF in the eight districts of Ibanda, Isingiro, Kabarole, Kakumiro, Kiboga, Kiryadongo, Nakaseke, Masindi and Sembabule, along the cattle corridor. The cumulative number of confirmed cases reached 14 with six fatalities (CFR = 43 per cent).

Rift Valley Fever (RVF): In 2018, Uganda contained a RVF outbreak that was reported along the cattle corridor in 17 districts;33 cumulative cases, and 18 deaths were reported.

Anthrax: In 2018, an Anthrax outbreak was reported in four districts of Arua (West Nile), Kiruhura (South western), Isingiro (West Nile) and Kween (Eastern). Ten cases were confirmed with one death. The outbreak has been contained.

Black Water Fever: Fourteen children were affected by a Black Water Fever in Manafwa District, Eastern Uganda. The MOH deployed a rapid response team and provided timely treatment to the affected thus controlling the outbreak.

Measles and rubella: In 2018, Uganda was hit by a measles outbreak with 76 out of 122 districts affected with 1,216 cumulative cases. About 33 districts also reported a rubella outbreak across the country with 196 cases and zero case fatality rate. With Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisations (GAVI) support, the country will now introduce the Measles Rubella combined vaccine into the national immunization schedule in 2019.

Ebola preparedness and prevention: As of 31 December 2018, the MOHhad not confirmed any case of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in Uganda. Surveillance continues at the community, health facilities, formal and informal points of entries (POE) in all 30 high risk districts. MOH and partners continue to identify alerts, validate, isolate suspected cases and collect samples which are tested in-country at the Uganda Virus Research Institute.

Floods and Landslides

In October, a flood and landslide occurred in Bukalasi sub county, Bududa district, affecting 13 villages and killing 43 people, including eight children, and injuring 21. The OPM and partners rescue teams conducted search and recovery of the dead bodies and evacuated the injured. Road infrastructure, water and sanitation facilities, and education facilities were destroyed.

Kenya: UNICEF Kenya Humanitarian Situation Report January to December 2018

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

• In 2018, approximately 700,000 people were food insecure by August 2018, down from 3.4 million in August 2017.

• The above-average ‘long’ rains resulted in mass displacement with 311,000 people displaced by mid-May 2018.

• In 2018, a total of 306,514 children were reached with life-saving health interventions through integrated health outreach. While over 2.9 million children were reached as part of the polio vaccination campaign for the Horn of Africa.

• With UNICEF support, 245,219 acutely malnourished children were admitted for treatment in therapeutic and supplementary feeding programmes in 2018.

• Over 189,883 people in drought, cholera and flood-affected counties benefitted from permanent access to safe water through repair of water points.

• In 2018, UNICEF’s Humanitarian Action for Children appeal of US$ 34.2 million had a funding gap of 58 per cent.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

Approximately 2.55 million people were food insecure in March 2018, down from 3.4 million in August 2017, as Kenya continued to face the effects of the severe drought from the previous year and high staple food prices. However, by August 2018 the population requiring food assistance had reduced significantly to 700,0009 , due to substantial crop production, low market prices and available supplies in the local markets following record-high ‘long’ rains from March – May. According to the National Drought Management Authority, all 23 Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASAL) counties were categorized in the normal drought phase by August 2018 (stressed, IPC phase 2), and majority of the open water sources were filled with water, stabilizing average return distances to water points. According to the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWSNET), the October to December short rainy season was significantly below average and crop production is expected to be 70 percent of average. As a result, deterioration in food security will most likely be gradual, and additional ASAL counties are anticipated to move to Stressed level (IPC phase 2) from February 2019.

At the beginning of 2018, acute malnutrition remained at critical levels (phase 4, GAM WHZ 15 - 29.9 per cent) in Turkana Central, North, West and South, Tana River, Wajir North, North Horr and Laisamis sub-counties, while Isiolo and Kajiado reported a serious nutrition situation (phase 3, GAM WHZ 10.0 -14.9 percent). The nutrition situation improved due to the improvement in food security with the children in need of treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) reducing to 85,105 by August 2018, down from 104,614 children in January 2018. However, critical GAM levels (15 - 29.9 per cent) were sustained in Mandera, Turkana, Samburu, and parts of Baringo (East Pokot), and Marsabit (North Horr) counties, primarily driven by poor childcare feeding practices and lack of suitable access to health facilities. Serious GAM levels (10 - 14.9 per cent) are anticipated in Wajir, Garissa, Isiolo, Laikipia, Tana River, and Marsabit (Laisamis) counties in January 2019.

The above-average long rains also resulted in massive flooding in 40 out of 47 counties, with 800,000 people affected, including 311,000 displaced (approximately 47 per cent children), 186 killed and nearly 100 injured by mid-May 2018. Of the displaced children, about 18,725 (42 per cent girls) required child protection interventions and about 46,000 children could not access schooling by mid-May as 329 schools were hosting people displaced by the floods. Timely emergency assistance to affected populations in the most hard-to-reach areas was compromised as major roads and school infrastructure was damaged. With the cessation of the long rains in May, floodwaters receded in most of the flood-affected areas which improved road access and displaced populations returned to their homes by end of June. However, in Tana River county, farms and villages mainly in Tana Delta area were still flooded, and most of the displaced were still living in camps, with 10 internally displaced population (IDP) camps still hosting 400 households.

The flooding also compounded ongoing disease outbreaks, with 5,470 cholera cases (78 deaths and case fatality rate of 1.4 per cent) reported across 19 counties; 111 Rift Valley Fever human cases (14 deaths) reported across Wajir (75), Marsabit (35) and Siaya (1) counties and 1,465 chikungunya cases reported. The first cholera outbreak began on 26 December 2014 and ended on 19 August 2018.The next cholera outbreak started on 8 September 2018 and ended 23 October 2018 with only 40 cases in three counties. Since the last case, three incubation periods have passed and by the 20 November the Government declared the outbreak under control10 . Additionally, 24 measles cases were reported in Wajir county in February and a circulating vaccine derived type 2 polio virus was found in a sewage sample in Nairobi county in May 2018. Since the beginning of the year, six counties (Mandera, Garissa, Wajir, Nairobi, Kitui and Murang’a) reported measles outbreaks with a total of 744 cases with 66 confirmed and one death reported by end of the year. There was significant reduction in the number of measles cases reported in the last quarter of the year in Mandera and Nairobi following the vaccination campaign, with no new cases reported between August and December 2018. However, there was a spike in the cases reported in Wajir County towards end of the year, with 15 cases being reported between 7 and 21 December 2018.

In the first half of the year, drought-related inter-ethnic conflicts and insecurity in Garissa, Mandera, Turkana, Samburu, Baringo, West Pokot, Wajir, Tana River intermittently affected access to learning and constrained emergency education assessments and interventions. In Baringo County, 133 schools were affected, and 20 schools were closed in February, affecting access for approximately 30,000 learners. On 12 February, a terrorist-related attack by armed militants led to the death of two non-local teachers in Qarsa Primary School, Wajir County, and resulted in 900 non-local teachers leaving Wajir county, negatively impacting learning for approximately 45,000 children. Inter-ethnic conflicts in Narok South, Baringo and Marsabit counties led to the temporary closure of over 30 schools, interrupting learning for more than 8,000 children (40 per cent girls) in September and October 2018.

A sudden influx of asylum seekers from Ethiopia to Moyale in Marsabit county due to intercommunal conflict was reported in March 2018, with a total of 10,557 people (over 80 per cent women and children) registered at the peak of the crisis. The Dambala Fachana camp in Moyale that was hosting the asylum seekers was closed on 29 September, with 302 individuals transferred to Kakuma, while 700 individuals opted to return to Ethiopia. In December, conflict was reported in the border area, and Kenya Red Cross estimates that a total of 8,620 household crossed the border to Mandera county and are integrated in the host community of Banisa and Takaba. According to the UNHCR November 2018 update, Kenya hosts 470,088 refugees and asylum seekers (56 per cent children). Almost 55 per cent of refugees and asylum seekers in Kenya originate from Somalia. Other major nationalities are South Sudanese (24.4 per cent), Congolese (8.7 per cent) and Ethiopians (5.9 per cent). Since the beginning of the year, 5,116 refugee children (3,170 boys and 1,946 girls) have arrived in Kakuma and Kalobeyei refugee camps.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update January 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

2018 Humanitarian Funding Update: looking back at 2018

Since reports on 2018 funding continue to be received well into the first quarter of 2019, this month’s update includes data for last year. At the end of December 2018, US$24.93 billion were required to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need through 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP). At that point, the plans were funded at $14.58 billion, 58.5% of funding requirements. Additional contributions reported in January 2019 bring the total funding figure for UN-led plans to $15.07 billion, 60.5% of funding requirements.

Global requirements for 2018 were $230 million higher than for December 2017. The amount of funding reported against UN-coordinated appeals for 2018 as at 31 January 2019 is $78 million higher than the amount reported for 2017 as at end January 2018.

The perspective for 2019

The GHO 2019 published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans, the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). As at the end of January, with the inclusion of the Madagascar Flash Appeal (November 2018 – April 2019), requirements have reached $21.93 billion. These figures do not include those for the Syria HRP, which will be published at a later date.

The GHO 2019 outlined plans to assist an estimated 93.6 million of 131.7 million people assessed to be in need in 2019, as opposed to 97.9 million of 133.3 million people in need at the end of 2018. The Madagascar Flash Appeal (November 2018 – April 2019), the Mozambique Plan (November 2018 - June 2019) and the Venezuela RMRP – all newly tracked – together add 3.36 million people to those to receive humanitarian aid this year.

In 2019, the number of people in need and to receive assistance is higher than last year in five countries (Cameroon, Ethiopia, Myanmar, the Philippines and Yemen) and lower in nine countries (Bangladesh, Burundi, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Somalia).

As of the end of January 2019, an estimated 95.1 million of 134.1 million people in need are expected to require assistance in 2019.

Plans were finalized in January 2019 for the Central African Republic (CAR), Nigeria, Somalia and Ukraine.

On 7 January, the Government of the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Humanitarian Country Team officially launched the Central African Republic HRP 2019, requesting $430.7 million to assist 1.7 million extremely vulnerable Central Africans. The Humanitarian Coordinator called upon donors to help mobilize funding for CAR to consolidate achievements of previous years and to support humanitarian response in 2019; 900,000 people were provided with humanitarian assistance through the CAR HRP in 2018.

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 fin Décembre 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

Uganda: UNICEF Uganda Humanitarian Situation Report – November 2018

Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda

Highlights

• No Ebola case has been reported in Uganda despite the persistent influx of refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and regular trade activities across the DRC/Uganda border. This is largely attributed to the intensive Ebola prevention and preparedness efforts by the Ministry of Health and partners, including UNICEF. Over 100,000 people, including 35,000 children, were reached with messages on signs, symptoms, prevention and control of Ebola by UNICEF and the Uganda Red Cross Society.

• Uganda continues to host over 700,000 refugees and asylum seekers from South Sudan, nearly 285,000 from DRC, over 33,000 from Burundi and 50,000 from Somalia, Rwanda and other countries.

• Over 800 unaccompanied and separated children received alternative care services in South Sudanese and Congolese refugee settlements; approximately 1,000 children and adolescents accessed formal or informal education; and 48,000 people accessed appropriate sanitation facilities in refugee hosting districts.

• The overall number of children admitted for severe acute malnutrition has reduced significantly over the last two months from over 1,700 to 934 and currently at 485.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

Refugees: Uganda hosts over 700,000 refugees and asylum seekers from South Sudan, nearly 285,000 from DRC, over 33,000 from Burundi and 50,000 from Somalia, Rwanda and other countries.

The Government has developed the Uganda 2019-2020 Refugee Response Plan (RRP) to maintain Uganda’s asylum space and preserve equal and unhindered access to its territory; implement protection processes that promote the full enjoyment of rights and uphold international protection standards; and ensure that Uganda’s refugee response paradigm progressively shifts from care and maintenance to inclusion and self-reliance. UNICEF contributed to its development.

Disease outbreaks:

Ebola preparedness and response As of 26 November 2018, the Public Health Emergency Operations Centre of the Ministry of Health (MoH) had not confirmed any cases of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in Uganda. Comprehensive surveillance continues in all communities, health facilities and at formal and informal border crossings in all of the 28 at-risk districts.
MoH and district authorities, with support from partners, continue to identify and isolate alert cases, with blood samples taken for testing to the Uganda Virus Research Institute.
According to the MoH and the World Health Organization (WHO), and in line with the EVD National Preparedness Plan, there is need to strengthen Ebola infection prevention and control interventions in all high-risk districts to reduce the transmission of infections. UNICEF is working closely with community leaders and local structures to communicate on the disease and orient local populations on actions they should take to prevent contracting and spreading it.

Other outbreaks

Since the beginning of the year, 20 cases of, and six deaths from, Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) have been reported in Kakumiro, Isingiro, Kiboga, Kiryandongo, Nakaseke and Sembabule districts; 35 cases of, and 18 deaths from, Rift Valley Fever (RVF) had been reported in 17 districts; 364 measles cases were reported in 79 districts, and 167 cases of Rubella in 36 districts.
Following the confirmation of a dengue fever case on 27 November, the Ministry of Health has instituted epidemiological linking and enhanced contact tracing for the case. No cholera cases were reported in November.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: EU Civil Protection Mechanism – Requests for Assistance: 2014 – 2018 – ECHO Daily Map | 03/01/2019

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Albania, Angola, Armenia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Bulgaria, Cabo Verde, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Ecuador, Fiji, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Italy, Latvia, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Norway, occupied Palestinian territory, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Romania, Senegal, Serbia, Sint Maarten (The Netherlands), Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, Yemen

Central African Republic: République centrafricaine : Plan de réponse humanitaire 2019 (Janvier – Décembre 2019)

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Sudan

ERS. DANS LE BESOIN 2,9M

PERSONNES CIBLÉES 1,7M

BUDGET (US$) 430,7M

APERÇU...

Ethiopia: ECHO Factsheet – Ethiopia – Last updated 17/12/2018

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan

Introduction

Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, faces a massive internal displacement crisis due to inter-communal violence and conflicts. The displacement crisis started in autumn 2017 and has escalated and spread in the second half of 2018. Meanwhile, there is dramatic political change brought about by the arrival of a new prime minister in 2018, an ongoing refugee influx from South Sudan and Eritrea, and millions of Ethiopians who need emergency food assistance and support to rebuild their livelihoods.

What are the needs?

The number of people forced to leave their homes and move to another place in Ethiopia (internally displaced persons or IDPs) has risen to almost 3 million. About 1.4 million people were forced from their homes in the first half of 2018. This is more than in Syria, Yemen, or the Democratic Republic of Congo and represents the fastest growing displacement crisis in the world. Two-thirds of today’s displaced people have fled inter-communal violence. Ethnic tensions have boiled over into violence; the violence and displacement has spread even further with the sweeping reforms and profound transformation that are undergoing in the country.

Unknown numbers of people have been killed, many were injured and victims of gender-based violence. In some areas, the authorities are inviting the IDPs to return to their place of origin. However, many of the ‘returned’ instead take shelter in sites near their village of origin. All returns should be voluntary, safe, and dignified.

As Ethiopia slowly recovers from two successive droughts, millions of people - in particular farming and herding communities in the south and southeast of the country – need emergency food assistance and support to rebuild their livelihoods.

Ethiopia hosts nearly one million refugees mainly from South Sudan – who are fleeing ongoing war and food insecurity - and Eritrea following the re-opening of the Ethiopia-Eritrea border in 2018. Refugees rely on aid to meet their basic needs including education and protection from gender-based violence.

How are we helping?

In 2018, the European Union has allocated €63 million to help people in need in Ethiopia. The focus is on addressing the most urgent humanitarian needs resulting from conflict-related displacement, the influx of refugees from South Sudan and Eritrea and climate-driven emergencies such as drought and flooding.

The response to the internal displacement (driven by the drought, conflicts and violence) focuses on life-saving interventions. Such interventions ensure the emergency supply of safe water, improved sanitation and hygiene promotion, shelter, food assistance, cash transfers, healthcare including the detection and treatment of malnourished children, and the prevention of and response to disease outbreaks such as cholera.

EU partner humanitarian organisations provide thousands of displaced families with essential items such as plastic sheets as a protection against the elements, mats, blankets, jerry cans, and other household goods. However, they face considerable challenges in trying to access all locations where violence has occurred to conduct independent needs assessments.

EU humanitarian aid to South Sudanese refugees provides shelter and access to safe water and sanitation facilities. Creating a protective environment for the most vulnerable refugees, such as unaccompanied minors and people with disabilities, is a priority. The EU funds food assistance, including e-vouchers that refugees can exchange for fresh food at markets. EU funding also supports the detection and treatment of acutely malnourished children and mothers. Education in emergencies is another priority, providing primary education to refugee children.

In response to the recent influx of Eritreans, the EU has scaled up its support to humanitarian organisations providing shelter and basic assistance to new arrivals.

After heavy floods and landslides in May 2018, which affected more than 320 000 people in the country’s Somali region in the eastern part of the country, the European Union allocated €2 million to provide emergency shelter, clean drinking water, and essential items such as mosquito nets and blankets.

Last updated
17/12/2018

South Sudan: South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) January – December 2019, December 2018

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

PEOPLE IN NEED 7.1M

PEOPLE TARGETED 5.7M

REQUIREMENTS (US$) 1.5B

NUMBER OF HUMA...

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.