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South Sudan: Report of the Secretary-General on South Sudan (covering the period from 2 September to 30 November 2018) (S/2018/1103)

Source: UN Secretary-General
Country: South Sudan

I. Introduction

The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 2406 (2018), by which the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) un...

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Top 10 of 2018 – Issue #10: “Silent” Refugee Crises Get Limited International Attention

Source: Migration Policy Institute
Country: Angola, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan

By Sara Staedicke

Despite the major focus by media and publics on a handful of refugee crises around the world—the Syrian, Afghan, and Venezuelan ones among them, and recently Yemen—displacement situations worsened during 2018 in a number of countries that received much less attention, and perhaps as a result less in the way of humanitarian aid.

Arguably at the top of the list of neglected crises were the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), whose displacement rivals that of Syria even as it has received far less attention; South Sudan, where widespread starvation has set in; and the Central African Republic (CAR), where displacement reached record levels. Crises in Burundi, Ethiopia, Nigeria, the occupied Palestinian territories, and Myanmar also were eclipsed by others in 2018.

While issues involving refugees and asylum seekers headed to developed countries often attract the most attention, witness the massive coverage of the European migration crisis in 2015-16 or the current intense focus on the movement of several thousand asylum seekers from Central America to the U.S. doorstep, 85 percent of the world’s estimated 25.4 million refugees are in developing countries. Sub-Saharan Africa is host to more than one-fourth of the world’s 68.5 million people forcibly displaced within or beyond their country’s borders.

Some African countries face critical humanitarian funding shortfalls and massive food insecurity; the crises in the DRC and South Sudan, where just 31 percent and 33 percent of international appeals had been funded as of September, were particularly highlighted as needing more resources. And a number of these countries are facing their own displacement crises even as they simultaneously host refugees from neighboring countries.

This article examines a few of these “silent crises.”

Democratic Republic of the Congo

As of October, an estimated 782,000 Congolese refugees and asylum seekers were hosted in neighboring countries, of which approximately 148,000 fled in 2018, particularly to Burundi, Uganda, and Zambia. While civil war ended in 2003, more than 4.5 million people remain internally displaced. The DRC also hosts more than 536,000 refugees from neighboring countries. Beyond ongoing displacement, the country is experiencing its worst Ebola outbreak, declared in August, creating a dangerous combination of conflict and disease. The conflict also has disrupted agriculture, putting 2 million children at risk of starvation. And more than 300,000 Congolese were expelled from Angola in October, accused of being in the country without authorization; at least 2,373 of these were registered refugees. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees has warned that this push of Congolese back to a desperate situation could quickly unravel into further crisis.

South Sudan

Since becoming the world’s newest country in 2011, South Sudan has faced violent conflict, drought, and famine that have displaced more than 4.7 million South Sudanese, including nearly 2.2 million to Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, and the DRC. South Sudanese became the third largest refugee population in the world in 2017, after Syrians and Afghans. Conflict, ongoing displacement, and drought have taken a toll on agricultural production with farm land abandoned, leaving 6 million in dire need of food assistance. With men caught up in the fighting, women and children make up 85 percent of South Sudanese refugees. Since 2013, civil war has also brought sexual violence, most recently in a November incident in which around 125 women and girls seeking food were beaten and raped. Despite a peace deal signed in August, the outlook remains grim as violence continues and food insecurity is predicted to worsen in the year ahead.

Central African Republic

Sectarian violence has spread since a coup d'état in 2013 and more than one in five residents have been displaced. Nearly 637,000 people were internally displaced as of November, 232,000 in the first half of 2018 alone, with more than 575,000 others having fled to neighboring countries. One in four children in the country is a refugee and “almost every Central African child needs protection from the fighting and its far-reaching effects.” Attacks against civilians, aid workers, and displacement camps are common. An increasing number of Central African Republic refugees are returning home, some to destroyed homes, and may lead to new conflict with existing residents.

Amid volatile conflict situations, mass food insecurity, and the possibility of an expanding Ebola outbreak, the complexity of conditions unfolding in parts of sub-Saharan Africa suggest the world’s eyes should not remain averted from these neglected crises

Democratic Republic of the Congo: The Democratic Republic of Congo Regional Refugee Response Plan (RRRP) 2019-2020

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia

Foreword

In 2018, the crisis in the Democratic Rep...

Uganda: The Democratic Republic of Congo Regional Refugee Response Plan (RRRP) January 2019 – December 2020

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United ...

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Democratic Republic of the Congo UNHCR Mid-Month Update (1 – 15 November 2018)

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan

This document provides a mid-month update. It complements UNHCR’s more detailed Operational Updates for DRC, which cover the full month.

Refugees

  • An increasing number of Central African refugees are voicing their intention of returning to their country of origin, primarily to Bangui. 876 households (3,707 people) have so far indicated this intention in Boyabu, Inke and Mole camps (Nord and Sub-Ubangi provinces). UNHCR continues to collect intentions of return.

  • 147 Burundian asylum-seekers staying in Sange assembly point were transferred to Kavimvira transit center (TC) due to the increasingly unstable security situation in the nearby Ruzizi plains. As of 15 November, 205 Burundian asylum-seekers were in Kavimvira TC and 147 in Monge Monge TC.

  • In November, UNHCR started providing essential medicines and basic equipment to 8 health centers in NordUbangi and Bas-Uélé provinces, in zones that have been hosting out-of-camp Central African refugees since May 2017. The intervention, initially planned to last 3 months, will continue in 2019.

  • 178 out of 240 planned transitional shelters were built for Central African refugees in the four camps in Nord and Sud-Ubangi provinces. They are intended for vulnerable households, and are built by refugee and local craftsmen under guidance from UNHCR's partner African Initiatives for Relief and Development (AIRD).

  • Poor road conditions, compounded by heavy rains, have limited humanitarian access to South Sudanese refugees in all settlements and border areas in northeastern DRC. Additional funding is needed to support the government in improving roads to ensure refugees receive assistance.

  • Following a security incident at Meri settlement, Haut-Uele Province, which hosts South Sudanese refugees, authorities have temporarily ceased cash-for-food distributions, usually done by WFP. While discussions on the approach to resolve this issue were ongoing, this illustrates the importance of further strengthening refugees’ self-reliance, in line with UNHCR’s strategic priorities.

Congolese returnees

  • Amidst the expulsion of Congolese citizens from Angola, UNHCR trained 164 individuals on human rights and tools to prevent abuses and promote peaceful coexistence. Participants included local authorities, the military, health and humanitarian staff, and civil society members in Kamonia and Kamako, Kasai Province.

Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

  • 2,000 internally displaced, returnee and host community households in Kamako, Kasai Province, received non-food items (NFIs) distributed by UNHCR’s implementing partner War Child. The distribution also benefitted those recently expelled from Angola. Another 1,800 households in Kasai and Kasai Central provinces received US$100 multi-purpose cash grants.

  • Security deteriorated in Beni, Masisi and Rutshuru territories in North-Kivu Province, with ongoing clashes and the displacement of a recorded 574 households in Beni Territory.

  • Consequently, sexual and gender-based violence remained a problem; 65 rapes were recorded by UNHCR’s partner INTERSOS in Rutshuru and Beni territories, and there was an increase in the use of survival sex by young girls in Beni to support their families, as reported by UNHCR’s protection monitoring.

  • UNHCR’s CERF-funded shelter project is making progress; 365 families have now moved into their shelters in Masisi Territory, and another 326 beneficiary families were identified in Beni Territory.

World: Aperçu de la Situation Humanitaire Mondiale 2019 – Version Abrégée

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale

PERSONNES DANS
LE BESOIN 131,7M

PERSONNES DEVANT
RECEVOIR UNE AIDE 93,6M

BESOINS FINANCIERS *
USD 21,9Md

Tendances et défis mondiaux

Malgré les progrès du développement mondial, une personne sur 70 dans le monde est en proie à
une crise et a besoin d’assistance humanitaire et de protection d’urgence.

De plus en plus de personnes sont déplacées par les conflits. Le nombre de personnes déplacées
de force est passé de 59,5 millions en 2014 à 68,5 millions en 2017.

Les catastrophes naturelles et le changement climatique ont un coût humain élevé. Les
catastrophes affectent 350 millions de personnes en moyenne chaque année et causent des
milliards de dollars de dégâts.

L’insécurité alimentaire est en augmentation. En juste deux ans, entre 2015 et 2017, le nombre
de personnes confronté à l’insécurité alimentaire de niveau critique ou pire a augmenté de 80
millions à 124 millions de personnes.

Les crises exacerbent les inégalités entre les sexes. Dans les situations de conflit, les filles ont
une probabilité 2,5 fois plus importante que les garçons d’être déscolarisées.

Les crises humanitaires affectent un plus grand nombre de personnes et durent plus longtemps.
Le nombre de personnes ciblées pour recevoir une assistance dans le cadre des Plans de réponse
humanitaire (HRP) des Nations unies a augmenté de 77 millions en 2014 à 101 millions en 2018.

Les crises humanitaires durent aujourd’hui, en moyenne, plus de neuf ans. Près de trois-quarts
des personnes ciblées pour recevoir de l’assistance en 2018 se trouvent dans des pays affectés
par une crise humanitaire depuis sept ans ou plus.

Les organisations humanitaires réussissent de plus en plus à sauver des vies et à réduire les
souffrances mais de nombreux besoins restent encore sans réponse.

Malgré une augmentation importante des financements de 10,6 milliards de dollars en 2014 à
13,9 milliards de dollars en 2017, le manque de financement des plans de réponse humanitaire
des Nations unies stagne à environ 40%.

2018 est en passe d’être une autre année record pour le financement humanitaire. Au 19
novembre, les donateurs et partenaires avaient fait état de contributions de 13,9 milliards de
dollars aux Plans de réponse humanitaire par rapport à 12,6 milliards de dollars à la même
période l’année dernière.

Les niveaux de financement ont également augmenté. Au 19 novembre, le financement des Plans
de réponse était de 56% par rapport à 52% à la même période en 2018.

Le financement humanitaire mondial a atteint un nouveau summum de 22 milliards de dollars par
rapport aux 21,5 milliards de dollars levés en 2017.

Les crises majeures et prolongées reçoivent la majorité des ressources. Entre 2014 et 2018,
quatre crises – en Somalie, au Soudan du Sud, au Soudan et en Syrie – ont comptabilisé à elles
seules 55% de tous les financements demandés et reçus.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 – Abridged version [EN/AR/ES/ZH]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

At a glance

PEOPLE IN NEED 131.7M
PEOPLE TO RECEIVE AID 93.6M
FUNDING REQUIRED* $21.9B

Global trends and challenges

Despite global development gains, one in every 70 people around the world is caught up in crisis and urgently needs humanitarian assistance and protection.

More people are being displaced by conflict. The number of forcibly displaced people rose from 59.5 million in 2014 to 68.5 million in 2017.

Natural disasters and climate change have a high human cost. Disasters affect 350 million people on average each year and cause billions of dollars of damage.

Food insecurity is rising. In just two years between 2015 and 2017, the number of people experiencing crisis-level food insecurity or worse increased from 80 million to 124 million people.

Crises exacerbate gender inequalities. Girls in conflict settings are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than boys.

Humanitarian crises affect more people, for longer. The number of people targeted to receive assistance through UN-led humanitarian response plans (HRPs) increased from 77 million in 2014 to 101 million in 2018.

The average humanitarian crisis now lasts more than nine years. Nearly three quarters of people targeted to receive assistance in 2018 are in countries affected by humanitarian crisis for seven years or more.

Humanitarian organizations are increasingly successful in saving lives and reducing suffering, but many needs still remain unmet.

Despite a significant increase in funding, from $10.6 billion in 2014 to $13.9 billion in 2017, the gap in coverage for UN-led humanitarian response plans hovers at about 40 per cent. 2018 is on track to be another record year for humanitarian funding. As of 19 November, donors and partners have reported contributions of $13.9 billion to HRPs, compared with $12.6 billion at the same time last year.

Coverage rates have also increased. As of 19 November, coverage for HRPs was at 56 per cent, compared with 52 per cent at the same time in 2018.

Global humanitarian funding has reached a new high of $22 billion, surpassing the $21.5 billion raised in 2017.

Large protracted crises command the majority of resources. Between 2014 and 2018, just four crises – Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Syria – accounted for 55 per cent of all funding requested and received.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update November 2018 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Launch of the Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 and the World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018 At the end of November 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) require US$ US$24.93 to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The requirements are lower than announced at the end of October ($25.2 billion) as those for Ethiopia have now been reduced. The plans are funded at $14.29 billion; this amounts to 57.3 per cent of financial requirements for 2018.

Two million less people are considered to be in need in Mali than at the end of October, hence the reduction in the overall number of people in need in this month’s overview.

Global requirements are $1.8 billion higher than at this time in 2017, and the amount of funding received is $1.69 billion higher than it was at this time last year.

On 4 December 2018, the USG/ERC launched the Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 and World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018 at an event in the Council Chamber, United Nations Office of Geneva. The event was attended by almost 200 representatives of Member States, intergovernmental and international organizations, UN organizations and NGOs, and by the Red Cross movement, the World Economic Forum and specialized meteorological foundations. A recording of the event can be found here: Event in Geneva to launch the GHO 2019 and WHDT 2018.

Pooled Funds In 2018, as of early December, country-based pooled funds (CBPF) received a total of US$845 million, once again setting a new record in annual contributions. Generous support from 31 Member States, from one crown dependency and from the general public through the UN Foundation, continues to demonstrate a high level of confidence in this mechanism for reaching the people most affected by humanitarian emergencies. In the past year, CBPFs have allocated a total $695 million, with $81 million awaiting approval. The Yemen Humanitarian Fund (HF) remains the largest of the funds, with $187 million already allocated towards response to urgent humanitarian needs. The HFs in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, South Sudan and Turkey each allocated over $50 million. Globally, three-fifths of all CBPF allocations were disbursed to NGOs, including 24 per cent ($170 million) directly to national and local NGOs. Another two-fifths were allocated to UN agencies, while Red Cross/ Red Crescent organizations received 1 percent of funding ($8 million).

Between 1 January and 30 November 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved $488 million in grants from the Central Emergency

Response Fund (CERF), including $308 million from the Rapid Response Window and $180 million from the Underfunded Emergencies Window.

The grants will support life-saving activities in 48 countries. In November, a total of $11 million was released to scale-up response to cholera in Nigeria and pneumonic plague in Madagascar, as well as to expand existing UN programmes in Venezuela in support of government efforts to increase essential health and nutrition services.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Le HCR lance deux plans de réponse pour les réfugiés en RDC et dans la région

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan

KINSHASA, 11 DECEMBRE 2018

Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), en coopération avec 60 partenaires, a publié aujourd’hui deux plans de réponse pour 2019-2020 pour la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) et la région. Pour venir en aide aux réfugiés et aux populations hôtes dans d’autres pays d’asile fortement affectés par les conflits, les partenaires lancent un appel de fonds conjoint de 918 millions de dollars américains pour 2019.

L’un des plans est destiné aux congolais ayant fui la RDC dans d’autres pays d’Afrique, et l’autre aux réfugiés qui se trouvent en RDC qui ont fui d’autres pays de la région.

Le plan de Réponse National (2019-2020) pour les réfugiés vivant en RDC est un outil de coordination entre plusieurs acteurs humanitaires et de développement, qui a pour objectif de couvrir les besoins des quatre principales populations de réfugiés (Burundais, Centrafricains, Rwandais et Sud-Soudanais) réparties à travers le territoire congolais.

«Plus d’un demi-million de réfugiés originaires de pays voisins ont été contraints de fuir leurs foyers et trouver refuge en RDC. Ce chiffre continue d’augmenter», a rappelé Ann Encontre, Représentante régionale du HCR en RDC et Coordinatrice pour les réfugiés congolais.

175 millions de dollars seront nécessaires pour réaliser les objectifs de ce plan, en collaboration avec 11 partenaires en RDC.

D’autre part, le plan de Réponse Régional (2019-2020) pour les réfugiés congolais cible 743 millions de dollars, qui devraient permettre de répondre aux besoins les plus urgents. Ces besoins comprennent la protection, l’eau et l’assainissement, la sécurité alimentaire, la santé, et l’éducation des réfugiés congolais se trouvant en dehors de la RDC.

Compte tenu de la capacité limitée des communautés d'accueil à supporter l'impact d'un nombre massif de réfugiés, les deux stratégies de réponse aideront également les populations locales, renforçant ainsi la coexistence pacifique entre les réfugiés et les communautés d'accueil.

« En soutenant le développement de moyens de subsistance viables et en adoptant une approche fondée sur la résilience, les réfugiés pourront contribuer au développement de leur pays d'accueil et de leur pays d'origine à leur retour », a conclu Ann Encontre.

La RDC accueille 531.819 réfugiés dont la plupart ont fui les violences dans les pays limitrophes. On compte également 781.917 réfugiés congolais vivant dans les pays principaux d’asile en Afrique.

Les plans de réponse pour les réfugiés seront disponible sous : https://data2.unhcr.org/en/situations/drc

World: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 49: 1 – 7 December 2018 Data as reported by 17:00; 7 December 2018

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Princ...

South Sudan: South Sudan set to vaccinate targeted healthcare and frontline workers operating in high risk states against Ebola

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan
Juba 8 December, 2018 – The Ministry of Health of the Republic of South Sudan with support from the World Health Organization (WHO), DFID, GAVI vaccine alliance an...

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