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Posts published in “Honduras”

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 24 – 30, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Namibia, Nicaragua, Nigeri...

World: Disaster Law Programme Annual Report 2018

Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies
Country: Bangladesh, Belize, Cambodia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Philippine...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 17 – 23, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Namibia, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 10 – 16, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Na...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 3 – 9, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Comoros, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, Somalia, South ...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: May 03 – 09, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Belize, Burundi, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Moza...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: April 26 – May 2, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Belize, Burundi, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Moza...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: April 19 – 25, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Belize, Benin, Burundi, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Liberia, Namibia, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Panama, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Seasonal rainfall deficits continue to strengthen across the Greater Horn of Africa

  1. Seasonal rainfall deficits since October have resulted in significant dryness across Angola, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

  2. Continued below-average rainfall and high temperatures have strengthened moisture deficits in South Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia, and Tanzania.

World: FAO Early Warning Early Action report on food security and agriculture (April – June 2019)

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security and agriculture is produced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It provides a quarterly forward-looking analysis of major disaster risks to food security and agriculture, specifically highlighting:

• potential new emergencies resulting from imminent disaster threats

• new developments in countries already affected by protracted crises which are likely to cause a further deterioration of food insecurity

This report is part of FAO’s efforts to systematically link early warnings to anticipatory actions. By providing specific early action recommendations for each country, the report aims to prompt FAO and partners to proactively mitigate and/or prevent disasters before they start to adversely impact food security.

High risk

Countries are categorized as “high risk” when there is a high likelihood of a new emergency or a significant deterioration of the current situation with potentially severe effects on agriculture and food security.

On watch

Countries categorized as “on watch” instead have a comparatively more moderate likelihood and/or potential impact, requiring close monitoring.

This report represents a summary and a prioritization of analysis provided by FAO’s corporate and joint multi-agency information and early warning systems:

• Global Information and Early Warning System on Food and Agriculture (GIEWS)

• Food Chain Crisis and Emergency Prevention System (FCC-EMPRES)

• Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) and Cadre Harmonisé

In addition to these, a number of other external sources are consulted. The list of sources is available on page vii.
Countries with ongoing emergency response efforts are not included in the report, unless there are signs of potential significant deterioration. An overview of countries worldwide with humanitarian response plans or emergency plans is provided on page vi.

More details on the risk ranking methodology and the early action recommendations are provided on page ii.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: April 12 – 18, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Belize, Botswana, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, Somalia, ...

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: April 5, 2019 to April 11, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Panama, Somalia, Sout...

World: Alert Spring 2019 | Vol. 20 No. 1 – No Health Without Mental Health – Providing Psychological Care in Emergencies Around the World

Source: Médecins Sans Frontières
Country: Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Liberia, Mexico, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World

lert is a quarterly magazine published by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF-USA) that features compelling stories and photography from our work in the field. Below is an excerpt from MSF-USA Board President John P. Lawrence's introduction to the Spring 2019 issue (Vol 20. No. 1.), No Health Without Mental Health.

Dear Friends,

I will never forget the experience of helping to respond to the devastating earthquake in Haiti in 2010. As a surgeon working with Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), I was particularly impressed by the integration of mental health care within our programs. As our surgical team made the morning rounds in the hospital wards, we would be followed by colleagues with expertise in delivering mental health services.

In Haiti, I saw that the devastating physical wounds patients were recovering from had clear psychological counterparts—whether a person was coping with the prospect of life after amputation, the loss of family members or friends, or reliving the horrors of the earthquake with each nerve-shattering aftershock.
While the surgical care we provided was a critical aspect of the healing process for survivors, their longterm well-being was entirely dependent on therapy directed to the emotional and psychological traumas they had endured.

This issue of Alert focuses on MSF’s varied responses to mental health needs. While mental health is gaining recognition as a unique medical field requiring greater attention, it remains insufficiently resourced.
As a medical humanitarian organization, MSF has had a longstanding commitment to addressing mental health needs, both as an independent service as well as part of more comprehensive care.

The importance of providing mental health support was also apparent while I was working with MSF in North Kivu province in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). This region—which is currently in the grips of an Ebola epidemic—has suffered from chronic conflict for decades, including extreme violence directed against civilians by various armed groups.
A feature of this pervasive violence is a high incidence of rape and sexual assault.

A separate unit in the hospital where I worked was devoted to caring for pregnant women who had been raped. This unit closely integrated prenatal maternal physical care with psychological supportive care.
MSF recognized the duality of health needs for both the mind and body and provided a comprehensive approach to caring for these women and preparing them to return home.

In this issue, we share the stories of survivors from a surge of conflict in DRC’s Kasai region. Over the course of a year and a half—between May 2017 and September 2018—our teams treated 2,600 victims of sexual violence at the Kananga provincial hospital. The vast majority of the victims were women. They describe horrific acts of violence, and the difficulties of healing after the attacks.
Mental health services are also often the central focus of the medical care our projects provide. For people traversing migration routes from Central America through Mexico, medical clinics supported by MSF are resourced to provide supportive mental health services and psychological first aid to help people cope with both the violence they fled in their home countries and that which they face during their journeys.

I hope you will appreciate the story about our innovative program to support community-based mental health care and outreach services in Liberia, a country whose health system is still recovering from the devastating Ebola epidemic that struck West Africa in 2014. Our last Ebola-related projects in Liberia were survivor clinics that offered care for people who continued to have physical and psychosocial issues after recovering from the disease.

When the mental health team began looking for services where they could refer patients, they learned that there was only one practicing psychiatrist in Liberia—a country with more than 4.7 million people.
This is what prompted MSF to conduct an assessment of the mental health needs in Liberia and ultimately partner with the Ministry of Health to improve and grow their services.

Finally, as explored in these pages, mental health care is not only critical for our patients, but also for our staff members. The stress of providing humanitarian care is well recognized. As an institution, MSF appreciates that we have an obligation not only to protect our employees’ physical health and security as best we can, but to ensure that their mental well-being is also prioritized.
Thank you for all that you do to support our work to provide comprehensive care for people in extreme situations.

Sincerely,

John P. Lawrence,
MD President, MSF-USA Board of Directors

World: Global Report on Food Crises 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network, European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations, Intergovernmental Authority on Development, International Food Policy Research Institute, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, UN Children's Fund, Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Food Security Information Network, Food Security Cluster, SICA
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

WHY THIS REPORT?

For several years the number of people who cannot meet their daily food needs without humanitarian assistance has been rising, primarily driven by two factors: persistent instability in conflict-ridden regions and adverse climate events.

These growing needs have been reflected in the increasing level of international humanitarian assistance, which reached US$27.3 billion in 2017, up from US$18.4 billion in 2013. While critical to saving lives and alleviating human suffering, humanitarian assistance does not address the root causes of food crises.

In response, those coordinating emergency humanitarian assistance are working more seriously with those in development support and conflict prevention to find ways to reverse the current trend in escalating numbers of food-insecure people in need of urgent action.

This “new way of working,” aims to address the humanitarian-development (HD) nexus, which emerged from the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016, as well as the Agenda for Humanity’s call to “move from delivering aid to ending need,” which provided a framework for thinking about innovative approaches to address food crises more sustainably in line with Sustainable Development Goal 2.1.

These collaborative efforts to prevent and address food crises are reflected in the UN Security Council’s adoption of resolution 2417 in May 2018. It allows the Council to consider its full range of tools — including sanctions — to ensure that parties to conflict do not violate international humanitarian law (IHL) by, for example, starving civilians as a weapon of war, unlawfully denying humanitarian access to civilian populations in need and depriving people of their means to produce food.

This HD nexus is also reflected in the Global Network Against Food Crises (GNAFC), which seeks to combat food crises from humanitarian and development perspectives and tackle the root causes of these crises (see box). This Global Report on Food Crises (GRFC) contributes to humanitarian development efforts by providing the global and national food security community and GNAFC members with timely, independent and consensus-based information on the severity, magnitude and drivers of food insecurity and malnutrition in food crisis contexts. This information supports humanitarian and development actors to plan and fund evidence-based responses, while using the data to seek high-level political action for durable solutions to food crises.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary: March 29 – April 4, 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragu...

World: UN Environment 2018 Annual Report

Source: UN Environment Programme
Country: Honduras, Japan, Nigeria, South Sudan, World
Beating plastic pollution

Reducing plastic pollution of the oceans is a priority issue for UN Environment. In 2018, we helped nations and individuals make huge comm...

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

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