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Posts published in “Iraq”

World: Aperçu du financement humanitaire, Avril 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

L’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale (GHO), publié le 4 décembre 2018 annonçait des besoins en financement de 21,9 milliards de dollars pour 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour les réfugiés et les migrants du Venezuela (RMRP). À la fin du mois de mars, en raison essentiellement de la publication du HRP de la Syrie nécessitant 3,32 milliards de dollars, les besoins avaient atteint 25,11 milliards de dollars. Ce mois-ci, l’augmentation des besoins pour l’Appel éclair révisé du Zimbabwe (suite au Cyclone Idai), passant de 233,8 millions à 293,9 millions de dollars, porte le total des besoins au 30 avril, à 25,17 milliards de dollars.
Les besoins financiers pour les Plans de réponse humanitaire du Burundi et de l’Irak, tous deux récemment publiés, correspondent à ce qui avait été anticipé dans l'aperçu de la situation humanitaire. À la fin du mois d’avril, le nombre de personnes dans le besoin dans 55 pays est estimé à 140,8 millions.². Les besoins humanitaires du Burundi et de l’Irak avaient déjà été anticipés dans l’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale de cette année.
Les plans visent à fournir une assistance à 105,7 millions de personnes.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 Monthly Funding Update – April 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

The Global Humanitarian Overview published on 4 December announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMPP). By the end of March, mainly as a result of publication of the Syria HRP requiring $3.32 billion, the requirements had reached $25.11 billion. This month’s increase in requirements for the revised Zimbabwe Flash Appeal (following Cyclone Idai) from $233.8 million to $293.9 million, brings the total requirement as at 30 April to $25.17 million.

Financial requirements for the Burundi and Iraq Humanitarian Response Plans, which were both published recently, are as anticipated in the annual, global appeal.

As at the end of April, 140.8 million people are estimated to be in need in 54 countries.2 This is the same number as at the end of the previous month. Humanitarian needs in Burundi and Iraq had already been anticipated in the annual, global appeal.

The plans aim to provide assistance for 105.7 million people.

World: CrisisInSight: Humanitarian Access Overview (May 2019)

Source: Assessment Capacities Project
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

INTRODUCTION

ACAPS Humanitarian Access Overview provides a snapshot of the most challenging contexts regarding humanitarian access.

ACAPS analysts looked into nine indicators to rank and compare the humanitarian access levels worldwide. Affected populations in more than 50 countries are not getting proper humanitarian assistance due to access constraints.
Humanitarian access has deteriorated in Colombia, Iraq, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Somalia over the past six months. 13 new countries entered the ranking since the latest ACAPS Humanitarian Access report released in August 2018.

Physical constraints and restriction/obstruction of access to services and assistance are the most common challenges

Yemen: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, May 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Haiti, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

Overview

Indonesia will hold the presidency in May. An open debate on peacekeeping focused on better training to improve the safety and security and performance of UN peacekeepers is planned. Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi will chair the meeting. Secretary-General António Guterres; the force commander of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lieutenant General Elias Rodrigues Martins Filho; and the director of the secretariat of the International Forum for the Challenges of Peace Operations, Björn Holmberg, are expected to brief.

The other open debate in May is on protection of civilians in conflict with a focus on community engagement as a means of enhancing the protection of civilians.

There are several mandate renewals related to African issues: UNISFA in Abyei and AMISOM in Somalia, as well as for the 2206 South Sudan Sanctions Committee and its Panel of Experts.

Other African issues include:

  • Burundi, on the political situation;
  • Libya, briefings by the ICC Prosecutor, the chair of the 1970 Libya Sanctions Committee, and by the head of UNSMIL;
  • Somalia, a briefing on UNSOM; and
  • Sahel, a briefing on the activities of the joint force of the Group of Five for the Sahel.

A briefing and consultations on the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq is scheduled ahead of its mandate renewal. In addition, the following Middle East issues will be considered:

  • Lebanon, on the implementation of resolution 1559;
  • Syria, the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weapons; and
  • Yemen, an update on the implementation of resolution 2452, which established the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement.

Regarding Europe, Council members are expecting to discuss the Secretary-General’s report on the negotiations on Cyprus. There will also be the biannual debate on Bosnia and Herzegovina.

On Asia, the Council will be briefed in consultations on the work of the 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee.

The annual briefing by the chairs of the three counter-terrorism subsidiary bodies is also expected.

The Council may meet to discuss the transition of the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) as the Secretary-General is scheduled to submit details for a follow-up mission this month.

It is likely that there will be two Arria-formula meetings: on Palestine and on peacebuilding.

World: Japan Donates USD 8.3 Million to Humanitarian Mine Action

Source: UN Mine Action Service
Country: Afghanistan, Iraq, Japan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World
The United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) is pleased to announce receipt of a contribution from the Government of Japan in t...

Afghanistan: Japan Donates USD 8.3 Million to Humanitarian Mine Action

Source: UN Mine Action Service
Country: Afghanistan, Iraq, Japan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic
The United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) is pleased to announce receipt of a contribution from the Government of Japan in the amou...

Egypt: Egypt Factsheet, March 2019

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

Egypt is a destination country for refugees and asylum seekers of 58 different nationalities. The majority of t...

World: Aperçu du financement humanitaire, Mars 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

L’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale (GHO), publié le 4 décembre 2018 annonçait des besoins en financement de 21,9 milliards de dollars pour 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour les réfugiés et les migrants du Venezuela (RMRP). À la fin du mois de février, les besoins s’élevaient à 22,42 milliards de dollars et, au 31mars, le montant demandé avait atteint 25,11 milliards de dollars. L’augmentation enregistrée ce mois-ci est principalement due à la demande de 3,32 milliards de dollars pour le HRP de la Syrie qui n’avait pas été inclus dans le calcul des besoins globaux en février, la finalisation du Plan de l’Éthiopie et les besoins associés à la réponse du Cyclone tropical Idai au Mozambique. À la fin du mois de mars, le nombre de personnes dans le besoin est estimé à 140,8 millions, par rapport à 138,8 millions à la fin du mois de février, dans 54 pays.2 Un nombre plus important de personnes sont estimées être dans le besoin en Éthiopie et au Mozambique qu’en février et davantage au Yémen.
Le nombre total de personnes que les plans visent à assister est aujourd’hui de 105,7 millions par rapport à 103,7 millions en février.

L’Appel Éclair pour le Mozambique envisageait une aide à 700 000 des 815 000 personnes affectées par la sécheresse. Ce plan a été révisé suite au passage du Cyclone Idai afin d’aider 1,1 million de personnes de plus. En Éthiopie, 300 000 personnes de plus que le nombre estimé précédemment doivent recevoir une assistance. De même, le nombre de personnes devant recevoir une assistance au Yémen est de 21,4 millions au lieu des 15 millions estimés précédemment. Des millions de personnes au Yémen sont aujourd’hui plus sous l’emprise de la faim, de la maladie et d’une plus grande vulnérabilité qu’il y a un an. En Syrie, le chiffre avancé de 11,2 millions de personnes devant recevoir une assistance a été révisé à la hausse ce mois-ci pour atteindre 11,7 millions de personnes.

World: Logistics Cluster: Global Overview – March 2019

Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Libya, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

World: Conflict-related sexual violence: Report of the Secretary-General (S/2019/280)

Source: UN Security Council
Country: Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Central African Republic, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

I. Introduction

  1. The present report, which covers the period from January to December 2018, is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 2106 (2013), in which the Council requested me to report annually on the implementation of resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1960 (2010) and to recommend strategic actions.

  2. 2019 marks the 10-year anniversary of the establishment of the mandate and Office of my Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict. Over the past decade, there has been a paradigm shift in the understanding of the scourge of conflict-related sexual violence and its impact on international peace and security, the response required to prevent such crimes and the multidimensional services needed by survivors. While the United Nations increasingly addresses the problem of sexual violence in conflict from an operational or technical perspective through the strengthening of security and justice institutions, it remains essential to recognize and tackle gender inequality as the root cause and driver of sexual violence, including in times of war and peace.

  3. Structural gender inequalities and discrimination are at the heart of the differential impact conflict has on women, men, boys and girls. Preventing sexual violence requires the advancement of substantive gender equality before, during and after conflict, including by ensuring women’s full and effective participation in political, economic and social life and ensuring accessible and responsive justice and security institutions. The mandate of the Office of the Special Representative is firmly rooted within the women and peace and security agenda, with its origin in Security Council resolution 1325 (2000). It is significant, therefore, that in 2018 my Special Representative signed a framework of cooperation with the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. The Framework affirms the ways in which the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the response to conflict-related sexual violence and the broader discourse on women, peace and security and gender equality are linked.

World: Global Nutrition Cluster Annual Report 2018: Achievements, Key Challenges and Ways Forward – January to December 2018

Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Iraq, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

In 2018, the GNC continued with the implementation of the 2017- 2018 work plan to achieve the three strategic priorities and two supporting objectives of the 2017-2020 GNC Strategy.

The first strategic priority concerns GNC support to coordination platforms to fulfill their role before, during and after a humanitarian response. In 2018 the GNC experienced a severe staff shortage to effectively support its 18 priority countries, due to a lack of funding for its Rapid Response Team (RRT). By March 2018, the GNC-CT lost all four RRT members that it had maintained for the last 6 years due to a funding shortage. Support to countries was therefore provided remotely or through field visits conducted by the GNC-CT, including the GNC Help Desk Officer. Despite the funding constraints, the GNC-CT managed to provide remote support to 24 country-level coordination platforms - including reviewing response plans and provid- ing guidance and operational support. In addition, three field missions were conducted to Bangladesh, Ethiopia and North Eastern Nigeria by the GNC Coordinator. The GNC also successfully organised global partner calls on Yemen, South Sudan, Niger, Ethiopia and DRC. These calls not only acted as good advocacy and fundraising opportunities, they also provided a platform for sharing the nutrition situation, progress with the response, challenges and key support needs from global partners to support coordination, information management and programme scale-up.

In July 2018, the GNC-CT had to reluctantly bid farewell to the GNC Help Desk Officer and Deputy GNC Coordinator who had to move on to take up other positions. Both colleagues had contributed greatly to the GNC in their roles for 3 years and 5 years respectively. In August 2018, the GNC recruited a GNC Help Desk Officer for technical support in nutrition in emergencies, a new position, one of the two Help Desk positions funded by the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). The position was created to provide ongoing support and linkages between the clusters at country level and the burgeoning Global Technical Assistance Mechanism for Nutrition (GTAM). In October 2018, the GNC-CT welcomed a new Deputy GNC Coordinator, as well as a UNICEF-funded RRT Information Management Officer (IMO), to the team. Shortly after, in December 2018, the much- needed GNC Help Desk for coordination support also joined the GNC-CT. A recruitment process for one more UNICEF-funded RRT Nutrition Cluster Coordinator (NCC) is ongoing.

Additionally, at the end of 2018, UNICEF as a CLA signed Project Cooperation Agreements (PCAs) with the International Medical Corps (IMC) to host an RRT Nutrition Cluster Coordinator (NCC) and with World Vision International (WVI) to host an RRT IMO for six months. This was possible thanks to funding from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), a key UNICEF/CLA donor.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 Monthly Funding Update – March 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

The Global Humanitarian Overview published on 4 December announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMPP). By the end of February, requirements had reached $22.42 billion and as at 31 March the amount requested had risen to $25.11 billion. The escalation this month is principally due to the requirement of $3.32 billion for the Syria HRP, which was not part of the calculation of overall requirements in February; the finalization of the Ethiopia plan; and the requirements for Tropical Cyclone Idai response in Mozambique.

As at the end of March, 140.8 million people, as against to 138.8 million at the end of February, are estimated to be in need in 54 countries.

More people are calculated to be in need in Ethiopia and Mozambique than in February, and more in Yemen.

The overall number of people the plans aim to assist is now 105.7 million as compared to 103.7 million in February. The Flash Appeal for Mozambique envisaged aiding 700,000 of the 815,000 drought affected people. That plan has been revised, following the passage of Cyclone Idai, to aid a further 1.1 million people. In Ethiopia, 300,000 people over and above the number estimated previously are to receive assistance. In addition, the number of people to receive assistance in Yemen has increased to 21.4 million people, rather than the 15 million previously estimated. Millions of people in Yemen are now hungrier, sicker and more vulnerable than a year ago. In Syria, the figure of 11.2 million people to receive assistance put forth in February has been revised this month to 11.7 million.

World: Alert Spring 2019 | Vol. 20 No. 1 – No Health Without Mental Health – Providing Psychological Care in Emergencies Around the World

Source: Médecins Sans Frontières
Country: Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Liberia, Mexico, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World

lert is a quarterly magazine published by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF-USA) that features compelling stories and photography from our work in the field. Below is an excerpt from MSF-USA Board President John P. Lawrence's introduction to the Spring 2019 issue (Vol 20. No. 1.), No Health Without Mental Health.

Dear Friends,

I will never forget the experience of helping to respond to the devastating earthquake in Haiti in 2010. As a surgeon working with Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), I was particularly impressed by the integration of mental health care within our programs. As our surgical team made the morning rounds in the hospital wards, we would be followed by colleagues with expertise in delivering mental health services.

In Haiti, I saw that the devastating physical wounds patients were recovering from had clear psychological counterparts—whether a person was coping with the prospect of life after amputation, the loss of family members or friends, or reliving the horrors of the earthquake with each nerve-shattering aftershock.
While the surgical care we provided was a critical aspect of the healing process for survivors, their longterm well-being was entirely dependent on therapy directed to the emotional and psychological traumas they had endured.

This issue of Alert focuses on MSF’s varied responses to mental health needs. While mental health is gaining recognition as a unique medical field requiring greater attention, it remains insufficiently resourced.
As a medical humanitarian organization, MSF has had a longstanding commitment to addressing mental health needs, both as an independent service as well as part of more comprehensive care.

The importance of providing mental health support was also apparent while I was working with MSF in North Kivu province in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). This region—which is currently in the grips of an Ebola epidemic—has suffered from chronic conflict for decades, including extreme violence directed against civilians by various armed groups.
A feature of this pervasive violence is a high incidence of rape and sexual assault.

A separate unit in the hospital where I worked was devoted to caring for pregnant women who had been raped. This unit closely integrated prenatal maternal physical care with psychological supportive care.
MSF recognized the duality of health needs for both the mind and body and provided a comprehensive approach to caring for these women and preparing them to return home.

In this issue, we share the stories of survivors from a surge of conflict in DRC’s Kasai region. Over the course of a year and a half—between May 2017 and September 2018—our teams treated 2,600 victims of sexual violence at the Kananga provincial hospital. The vast majority of the victims were women. They describe horrific acts of violence, and the difficulties of healing after the attacks.
Mental health services are also often the central focus of the medical care our projects provide. For people traversing migration routes from Central America through Mexico, medical clinics supported by MSF are resourced to provide supportive mental health services and psychological first aid to help people cope with both the violence they fled in their home countries and that which they face during their journeys.

I hope you will appreciate the story about our innovative program to support community-based mental health care and outreach services in Liberia, a country whose health system is still recovering from the devastating Ebola epidemic that struck West Africa in 2014. Our last Ebola-related projects in Liberia were survivor clinics that offered care for people who continued to have physical and psychosocial issues after recovering from the disease.

When the mental health team began looking for services where they could refer patients, they learned that there was only one practicing psychiatrist in Liberia—a country with more than 4.7 million people.
This is what prompted MSF to conduct an assessment of the mental health needs in Liberia and ultimately partner with the Ministry of Health to improve and grow their services.

Finally, as explored in these pages, mental health care is not only critical for our patients, but also for our staff members. The stress of providing humanitarian care is well recognized. As an institution, MSF appreciates that we have an obligation not only to protect our employees’ physical health and security as best we can, but to ensure that their mental well-being is also prioritized.
Thank you for all that you do to support our work to provide comprehensive care for people in extreme situations.

Sincerely,

John P. Lawrence,
MD President, MSF-USA Board of Directors

World: Logistics Cluster – Annual Report 2018

Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Myanmar, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Ar...

Libya: Libya: Registration Fact Sheet (March 2019)

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Liberia, Libya, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

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