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Posts published in “Iraq”

Ethiopia: Japan provides over US$5.8 million to support UNIDO projects

Source: UNIDO
Country: Ethiopia, Gabon, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Japan, Lebanon, Liberia, occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic

VIENNA, 11 March 2019 – The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has welcomed an announcement by the Government of Japan that it will contribute over US$5.8 million to nine projects in Ethiopia, Gabon, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Liberia, South Sudan, the State of Palestine and the Syrian Arab Republic. These UNIDO projects promote inclusive and sustainable industrial development by taking a human security approach. The concept of human security is closely related to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as it focuses on people and the ambitious goal to "leave no one behind".

UNIDO’s concept of inclusive and sustainable industrial development is included in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly in Goal 9 to build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization, and foster innovation. UNIDO’s mission echoes Goal 9 but also aligns with other SDGs, including those that are human security-related.

A kick-off ceremony, hosted by UNIDO Director General LI Yong and Ambassador Mitsuru Kitano, the Permanent Representative of Japan to the International Organizations in Vienna, has taken place in the presence of representatives from recipient countries.

“We thank the Government of Japan for the trust placed in us to deliver tangible results in close cooperation with all involved partners,” said UNIDO Director General Li. “The projects we are unveiling today are going to address the inequalities faced by the most vulnerable populations, inequalities that are preventing them from reaching economic empowerment.”

Ambassador Kitano expressed appreciation for UNIDO’s role “as a platform connecting recipient countries, donor countries and the private sector". He also said these nine projects “contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals, and at the same time, embody such important concepts as human security and the humanitarian-development nexus".

The project in Ethiopia builds on the outcomes of the first phase of the project, funded last year. It continues activities to improve the water supply, public health and general environmental quality through an innovative water sanitation system, which utilizes environmentally-friendly slow sand filtration and photo-voltaic electricity-generating technologies.

In Gabon, the project will strengthen food security and food quality to improve livelihoods, especially for women. It will provide direct technical assistance to inspection and market surveillance institutions, as well as to small-scale food producers in order to comply with international standards and promote awareness of the importance of quality with consumers and the private sector.

In the Islamic Republic of Iran, the project will promote the integration of the fishery and ancillary industries in Chabahar in the southern province of Sistan-Balochistan into regional and global markets through the capacity building of local institutions, the upgrading of enterprises in terms of quality, productivity and resource efficiency, and the enhancing of market access.

The project in Iraq will draw on the expertise of UNIDO in harnessing the productive capacities of internally-displaced persons and returnees through entrepreneurship and upgrading of technical skills. It aims to contribute to social stabilization and economic resilience in the Nineveh Governorate. In recent years, UNIDO has implemented several projects in Iraq with support from Japan.

The project in Lebanon will build on the results achieved in three previous interventions in the north of Lebanon to create economic opportunities and jobs in the construction sector, particularly among host and refugee communities. It will support the establishment of a vocational and skills training centre.

In Liberia, a project implemented in Nimba county will promote social stabilization by creating jobs and livelihoods for vulnerable people and communities, with a particular focus on youth. In targeting the wood and furniture industry, the project follows the Government of Liberia’s key priority areas for economic growth.

In South Sudan, the project will be implemented in Juba and its urban and peri-urban neighbourhoods. It will support agro-value chain development to create employment and income opportunities for internally-displaced persons and their host communities by providing skills and entrepreneurship training and by establishing the basic facilities for agro-processing.

A project will also be implemented in the State of Palestine to enhance the support for the creative garment and textile industry in the northern region of the West Bank. It aims to improve livelihoods and job opportunities, particularly for youth, and to support the development of local value chains.

In the Syrian Arab Republic, UNIDO will again partner with the UN Development Programme as lead agency, and with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization to maintain and improve Syria's human capital in various fields by providing multi-sectoral training opportunities to upgrade skills and knowledge for resilience building.

For further information, please contact:

Nahomi Nishio

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Monika Eichberger

Email

World: Gender as a Causal Factor in Conflict

Source: Department for International Development
Country: Colombia, Iraq, Myanmar, Nepal, Serbia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Uganda, World

Summary

Evidence is available to demonstrate the role of gender in different inter and intra state conflic...

World: Helpdesk Report: K4D – Gender as a Causal Factor in Conflict

Source: Department for International Development
Country: Colombia, Iraq, Myanmar, Nepal, Serbia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Uganda, World

Summary

Evidence is available to demonstrate the role of gender in different inter and intra state conflic...

World: Logistics Cluster: Global Overview – February 2019

Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

World: Europe Resettlement – January – December 2018

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Afghanistan, Belgium, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Netherlands, Niger, Nor...

Libya: Libya: Registration Fact Sheet (February 2019)

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Liberia, Libya, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 1, March 2019

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

COUNTRIES REQUIRING EXTERNAL ASSISTANCE FOR FOOD

FAO assesses that globally 41 countries, of which 31 are in Africa, continue to be in need of external assistance for food.
Conflict remains the main driver of high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather‑induced production declines and economic instability have also adversely impacted on food availability and access.

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA

Mostly reflecting beneficial weather conditions, production upturns were estimated in East, West and North Africa in 2018, while rainfall deficits cut outputs in Southern Africa. Continued poor rains have also affected the development of the 2019 crops in parts of Southern Africa, while conflicts in several other countries continue to curtail production prospects this year.

ASIA

Cereal production in 2018 in Far East Asia is estimated at a record high.
By contrast, outputs fell in the Near East and CIS Asia on account of rainfall deficits and the impact of conflicts in parts of the Near East. Production prospects for the soon‑to‑be harvested 2019 wheat crop are generally favourable across the region.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Cereal production is expected to increase in South America in 2019, recovering from last year’s reduced output. In Central America and the Caribbean, despite localized dry weather conditions, cereal outputs in 2018 were close to the average. The 2019 wheat crop in Mexico is likely to remain below average.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals [EN/AR/FR]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: Stop à la guerre contre les enfants (Résumé)

Source: Save the Children
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

RÉSUMÉ

« Chaque guerre est une guerre menée contre des enfants. »

Ces paroles prononcées il y a un siècle par Eglantyne Jebb, fondatrice de Save the Children, n'ont jamais résonné aussi fort. À l'heure où nous rédigeons ce rapport, des millions d'enfants à travers le monde sont pris au piège de conflits dont ils ne sont pas responsables. Leurs droits sont souvent bafoués en toute impunité.

Les nouvelles données présentées par Save the Children sont accablantes :

• 420 millions d'enfants (soit près d'un cinquième des enfants dans le monde) vivent dans une zone de conflit, contre près de 30 millions en 2016.

• Le nombre d'enfants vivant dans des zones de conflit a été multiplié par deux depuis la fin de la guerre froide.

• 142 millions d'enfants vivent dans des zones en proie à de violents conflits, où les affrontements font plus de 1 000 victimes par an.

• Une nouvelle analyse réalisée par Save the Children montre que le nombre de « graves violations » des droits des enfants en temps de conflit, rapporté et vérifié par les Nations Unies, a quasiment triplé depuis 2010.

• Des centaines de milliers d'enfants meurent chaque jour, victimes des effets indirects des conflits (malnutrition, maladies et absence de soins médicaux, eau et assainissement, etc.).

La protection des enfants frappés par les conflits, qui va de pair avec la concrétisation des promesses faites dans les déclarations, conventions et textes de loi du XXe siècle, constitue l'un des défis majeurs du XXIe siècle.
On assiste à une évolution de la nature des conflits et de leurs effets sur les enfants, avec de plus en plus de conflits intérieurs et d'acteurs armés. Des campagnes de violence sont menées délibérément à l'encontre de civils ; des écoles sont prises pour cible, des filles sont enlevées et réduites à l'esclavage et les populations sont volontairement affamées.

Les conflits armés durent plus longtemps ; à titre d'exemple, la guerre en Syrie (le conflit le plus important de ces dernières années) a déjà duré plus longtemps que la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Plus un conflit perdure, plus les dommages indirects sont conséquents, car les services essentiels cessent de fonctionner. Dans bon nombre de situations qui s'éternisent, la frontière entre « conflit » et « paix » est devenue floue.

Les conflits se déplacent également de plus en plus vers les zones urbaines ; à Mossoul et à Mogadiscio, par exemple, les enfants, ainsi que leurs maisons et leurs écoles, sont en première ligne, exposés à des attaques perpétrées au hasard. Dans les conflits armés d'aujourd'hui, bien souvent, il n'existe plus de champ de bataille clairement délimité : ce sont les maisons et les écoles qui sont maintenant devenues les terrains d'affrontement.

Les enfants en première ligne

Les enfants sont de plus en plus souvent les principales victimes des violences armées et des guerres. Les souffrances qu'ils endurent en temps de conflit sont différentes de celles des adultes, du fait notamment de leur plus grande faiblesse physique, mais aussi parce qu'ils ont tellement à perdre : leur développement physique, mental et psychosocial dépend en grande partie des conditions de vie de leur enfance.

Les différents effets des conflits sur les enfants dépendent d'un certain nombre de caractéristiques personnelles : principalement leur sexe et leur âge, mais aussi un éventuel handicap, leur origine ethnique, leur religion et leur vie en zone rurale ou urbaine. Les préjudices infligés aux enfants durant les conflits armés sont souvent plus graves que ceux que subissent les adultes et ont des implications à plus long terme, aussi bien pour les enfants euxmêmes que pour leurs sociétés.

Les enfants souffrent des conflits pour trois grandes raisons :

Ils peuvent être délibérément pris pour cible.
Ordonner des atrocités contre des enfants est un moyen extrêmement puissant de terroriser une population ; c'est donc une tactique militaire très prisée par les forces et les groupes armés dans bon nombre des conflits aujourd'hui. Les enfants sont aussi souvent visés parce qu'ils sont faciles à manipuler et à exploiter, par exemple en tant que soldats ou kamikazes. Les écoles deviennent des cibles pour des raisons tactiques : elles se transforment en terrain de recrutement ou sont utilisées à des fins militaires.

Les enfants sont victimes d'actions militaires disproportionnées ou menées au hasard.
Ils peuvent par exemple être tués ou blessés par des mines terrestres ou par l'utilisation d'armes explosives causant de vastes dégâts dans les zones peuplées.

Les enfants souffrent énormément des conséquences indirectes des conflits.
Celles-ci incluent les déplacements, l'effondrement des marchés et des services publics essentiels, comme les soins de santé, l'eau et l'assainissement, ou encore une insécurité généralisée. Bien que les effets indirects et les violations directes fassent tous deux partie du même ensemble de préjudices infligés aux enfants par les conflits modernes, ces conséquences indirectes des conflits touchent et tuent bien plus d'enfants. Sans compter tous les autres enfants privés d'école, qui voient s'envoler leurs chances d'un avenir meilleur.

World: We must do more to make emergency sanitation safer

Source: Oxfam
Country: Iraq, Nigeria, South Sudan, Uganda, World

Why do so few women and girls use emergency latrines? Rachel Hastie shares key findings that could help make sanitation safer in camps.

We looked at the latrine with dismay, as Sarah told us how her relatives had been killed in South Sudan. She had walked to the Ugandan border with her three children and nine nephews and nieces. Their latrine, rapidly constructed in a camp for refugees, was shared with five other families she didn’t know.

Stripped of its plastic sheeting, the shallow latrine was flooded from recent rains. Maggots crawled around the uneven slab set on slippery logs. It was hard not to feel thoroughly ashamed that, in the face of this woman’s courage and resilience, this was the best that humanitarians could provide for her.

Sarah didn’t use the latrine, of course. It offered no privacy, no dignity, and was downright dangerous. Instead, each evening she dug a hole her small plot for the family to defecate into. However, space was running out and the proposed shift to household latrines was painfully slow.

Communal latrines are places of danger for women and girls

In 2017, we joined researchers from the University of Loughborough to find out whether sanitation lighting could reduce the risk of gender-based violence (GBV) in camps. We expected to find out a lot about lighting, but what surprised us was just how few people were using emergency latrines and why.

Like Sarah, an astonishing 92% of women and girls we spoke to said they didn’t use latrines after dark, with many using open defecation and buckets or bags in their shelters, despite there being no safe disposal method.

Similarly, 63% of women in Iraq and 44% in Nigeria said they did not use latrines after dark. Many did not use latrines during day time either, describing men spying or walking in on them, being sexually harassed, and assaulted in or around the latrines.

Who are we building latrines for?

Women and girls use latrines more than males due to menstruation, pregnancies and their long-term impact on women’s bodies. When we asked people what would make them feel safer using the sanitation facilities, we got some strong messages for the humanitarian community.

Lighting alone cannot compensate for poor design and build

Far too many latrine cubicles don’t have doors, never mind locks. They often have flimsy or damaged walls, and lack space for pregnant women, and those with children or helping a disabled relative. Some latrines we saw were just so far from meeting our existing standards that no amount of lighting would ever make them safe.

The shame and risks for women using latrines

Good quality structures in the wrong place can be dangerous too. In Iraq, women and girls were expected to use latrines less than one metre away from those for men. Having lived under strict ISIS control, any contact with a male who was not a close relative held serious consequences for them.

As one aid worker explained: “Latrines are so close together that they cause a massive risk for women. If seen coming out at the same time as a man, you can be labelled a prostitute. Then you are shamed, and can be killed or assaulted by your family, or raped by men in the community who will say that if you tell anyone, they will say you are a prostitute.”

Continuous consultation, and improvement of latrines is key

Women and girls in the Nigeria camp also experienced danger, shame and embarrassment at being seen by men going to the toilet, particularly by male elders. However, after feedback from women, the latrines were upgraded with strong walls and locking doors. Hand-held solar lights helped everyone feel safer going to the latrines after dark, and made it easier to keep them clean.

What can the humanitarian sector learn to make sanitation safer?

Cultural and social factors affect safety around sanitation facilities. Instead of designing latrines with fit, healthy males in mind, we must design for the people who are most marginalised, vulnerable and scared. We need to involve users – especially women and girls – in the design. And we need to make efforts to constantly listen, improve and adapt.

Women and girls in all the locations had alarmingly high levels of fear about GBV – for them, refugee and internally displaced people (IDP) camps are dangerous places, especially the sanitation facilities. None of this comes as a surprise.

Wherever we go to the toilet – Oxford, Nairobi or a refugee camp in a desert – we all want safety, privacy and dignity. By not meeting the standards we have already set for ourselves, we are putting women and girls at greater risk, and undermining our very public health rationale.

Rachel Hastie
Rachel has worked for Oxfam GB for 16 years in field and headquarter posts implementing and supporting humanitarian programmes. Since 2006 she has been the Global Protection Adviser leading Oxfam's programme strategy for protection work.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

Mali: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, March 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Yemen

Overview

France will hold the presidency in March. France and Germany, the Council president in April, will hold a “joint presidency” covering both months.

There will be one open debate on combating the financing of terrorism, during which a resolu-tion may be adopted.

The Council is expected to carry out a visiting mission to Mali. A briefing on the visiting mission and a ministerial meeting on Mali with the par-ticipation of Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubèye Maïga are scheduled shortly after the delegation returns.

Regarding other African issues, there will be briefings, followed by consultations, on South Sudan (UNMISS), the DRC (MONUSCO), and the Great Lakes Region. Consultations are also anticipated on Libya (UNSMIL) and the 1970 Libya sanctions regime. The Council is scheduled to adopt resolutions renewing the mandates of UNMISS, MONUSCO, and UNSOM (Somalia).

The Council will be briefed on Yemen on the implementation of resolution 2452, which estab-lished the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement (UNMHA). It will also receive the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weap-ons in Syria.

Other Middle East issues that will be consid-ered include:

• Israel/Palestine, the regular monthly meeting;
• Lebanon, an update on the implementation of resolution 1701, which called for a cessation of hostilities between the Shi’a militant group Hezbollah and Israel in 2006; and
• UNDOF in the Golan Heights, the quarterly report and most recent developments.

Two meetings are anticipated on European issues: Federica Mogherini, the EU High Repre-sentative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, is expected to brief the Council on UN-EU coop-eration in maintaining international peace and security; and Slovakian Foreign Minister Miro-slav Lajčák, the current Chairperson-in-Office for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), will brief on OSCE activities.

Council members anticipate a briefing on Haiti (MINUJUSTH), most likely from Special Representative and head of MINUJUSTH, Helen Meagher La Lime, and will also consider the most recent report on the implementation of resolution 2410—which set a timeline for the gradual draw-down of formed police units—and political and security developments in the context of the 15 April expiry of MINUJUSTH’s mandate.

In a change of practice, the Council will hold its quarterly meeting on Afghanistan (UNAMA)as a briefing, followed by consultations, rather than in debate format, prior to renewing the mis-sion’s mandate later in the month.

The Council is also expected to adopt a resolu-tion renewing the mandate of the Panel of Experts of the 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee.

A briefing of the 1540 Sanctions Committee is also anticipated during the month.

There will be an informal interactive dialogue on the Middle East region. Arria-formula meet-ings are anticipated on women’s participation in peace processes, on Crimea, and on criminal jus-tice and human rights.

Council members will continue to follow closely developments in Venezuela and may meet on this and other issues not on the programme as needed.

Niger: UNHCR Niger: Situation Générale pour le Niger – décembre 2018

Source: Government of Niger, UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Ir...

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