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Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 28: 8 – 14 July 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 14 July 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 71 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (environmental sample) in Ghana

  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo

  • Humanitarian crisis in Cameroon

  • Humanitarian crisis in Central African Republic.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

This week, health authorities in Ghana confirmed circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) in an environmental sample. Additionally, two case-patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) tested positive for genetically linked cVDPV2 in Haut Lomami Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The frequency of occurrence of cVDPV2 events in the African Region has been increasing (lately), with three major loci, situated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Lake Chad basin and the Horn of Africa. These epicentres are characterized by major prolonged complex humanitarian emergencies – with insecurity, disrupted health systems and social dislocation. However incidentally, the countries around these epicentres also have conditions that are conducive to the rapid spread of polioviruses, namely accumulation of unprotected persons, suboptimal sanitation and high population mobility. The circulation of vaccine-derived polioviruses in the African region is likely to become a major public health problem if not tackled decisively at this point in time.

The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues. The occurrence of a confirmed case in Goma on 14 July 2019, while long anticipated and prepared for, emphasises the enormous challenges around control of this outbreak, reinforcing the need for strong and consistent implementation of all public health measures. While progress is slowly being made, the ongoing response operations are being challenged by suboptimal resourcing, negatively impacting on the entire response. Member States and other donors are strongly encouraged to provide additional funding in order to ensure that hard won progress in containing this EVD outbreak will not suffer a potentially devastating setback due to financial limitations

World: Logistics Cluster: Global Overview – June 2019

Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Libya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

World: Drought, Disease and War Hit Global Agriculture, Says U.N.

Source: Inter Press Service
Country: Cambodia, Central African Republic, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mongolia, Mozambique, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

By James Reinl

UNITED NATIONS, Jul 11 2019 (IPS) - The United Nations has warned of drought, disease and war preventing farmers from producing enough food for millions of people across Africa and other regions, leading to the need for major aid operations.

A report called the Crop Prospects and Food Situation by the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) says that shortages of grain and other foodstuffs have left people in 41 countries — 31 of them in Africa — in need of handouts.

“Ongoing conflicts and dry weather conditions remain the primary causes of high levels of severe food insecurity, hampering food availability and access for millions of people,” U.N. spokesman Farhan Haq told reporters on Tuesday.

Southern Africa has experienced both dry spells and rainfall damage from Cyclone Idai, which made landfall in Mozambique on Mar. 14. The storm caused “agricultural production shortfalls” and big “increases in cereal import needs,” added Haq.

Farmers in Zimbabwe and Zambia have seen harvests decline this year. Some three million people faced shortages at the start of 2019, but food price spikes there will likely push that number upwards in the coming months, researchers say.

In eastern Africa, crop yields have dropped in Somalia, Kenya and Sudan due to “severe dryness”, added Haq.

According to the FAO, life for rural herders in Kassala State, in eastern Sudan, has been upended by a drought that has forced them to move livestock away from traditional grazing routes in pursuit of greener pastures.

“Life would be so hard if our livestock died. We wouldn’t have food or milk for the children,” Khalda Mohammed Ibrahim, a farmer near Aroma, in Kassala State, told FAO. “When it is dry, I am afraid the animals will starve — and then we will too.”

Droughts are getting worse, says the U.N. Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD). By 2025, some 1.8 billion people will experience serious water shortages, and two thirds of the world will be “water-stressed”.

In Asia, low yields of wheat and barley outputs are raising concerns in North Korea, where dry spells, heatwaves and flooding have led to what has been called the worst harvests the hermit dictatorship has seen in a decade, the report said.

More than 10 million North Koreans — or 40 percent of the country’s population — are short of food or require aid handouts, the U.N.’s Rome-based agency for agriculture said in its 42-page study.

FAO researchers also addressed the spread of a deadly pig disease in China that has disrupted the world’s biggest pork market and is one of the major risks to a well-supplied global agricultural sector.

China is grappling with African swine fever, which has spread across much of the country this past year. There is no cure or vaccine for the disease, often fatal for pigs although harmless for humans.

By the middle of June, more than 1.1 million pigs had died or been culled. The bug has also been reported in Vietnam, Cambodia, Mongolia, North Korea and Laos, affecting millions of pigs and threatening farmers’ livelihoods.

The FAO forecast a five percent fall in Chinese pork output this year, while imports were predicted to rise to almost two million tonnes from an average 1.6 million tonnes per year from 2016 to 2018.

Conflict is another worry, the FAO said. While Syria and Yemen have seen “generally conducive weather conditions for crops”, fighting between government forces, rebels and other groups in both countries has ravaged agriculture.

Violence in Yemen has triggered what the U.N. calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, with 3.3 million people displaced and 24.1 million — more than two-thirds of the population — in need of aid.

Last month, the U.N.’s World Food Programme (WFP) announced a “partial suspension” of aid affecting 850,000 people in Yemen’s capital Sanaa, saying the Houthi rebels that run the city were diverting food from the needy.

Likewise, in Africa, simmering conflicts in the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan have caused a “dire food security situation”. In South Sudan, seven million people do not have enough food.

World: International Activity Report 2018

Source: Médecins Sans Frontières
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russian Federation, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

By Dr Marc Biot, Dr Isabelle Defourny, Marcel Langenbach, Kenneth Lavelle, Bertrand Perrochet and Teresa Sancristoval, Directors of Operations

In 2018, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams provided medical and humanitarian assistance to people facing extreme hardship in over 70 countries. From treating war-wounded ever closer to frontlines in Yemen, to responding to epidemic outbreaks such as cholera in Niger, or providing assistance to people fleeing violence in the Central African Republic, emergency response continued to be a core part of our work.

As 2018 drew to a close, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was in the midst of its second Ebola outbreak of the year, and its biggest ever. MSF was part of the response, led by the Ministry of Health. Although rapid and well-resourced, with teams having access to a promising new vaccine and several new drugs with the potential to better protect and treat people, the response, and those managing it, failed to adapt to people’s priorities, and to gain the trust of the community. This lack of trust in the health services meant people delayed or avoided seeking treatment. By the end of the year, the epidemic in North Kivu and Ituri provinces had claimed more than 360 lives and in some areas was still not under control.

Seeking care in war zones

Early in the year, Syrian civilians and medical staff were caught in the violence in Idlib, in the northwest, and in East Ghouta, near the capital Damascus. In East Ghouta, the barrage was relentless in February and March, with waves of dead and injured arriving at MSF- supported hospitals and health posts. As the siege blocked incoming aid, medical staff had few medical supplies to work with. By the end of the offensive, 19 of the 20 hospitals and clinics we supported were destroyed or abandoned, leaving civilians with few options to seek medical help.

The war in Yemen, which has left the country and its healthcare system in ruins, entered its fourth year. The Saudi- and Emirati-led coalition continued to target civilian areas with airstrikes and bombings, including our new cholera treatment centre in Abs. The war is taking a heavy toll on people, who often must negotiate constantly changing frontlines to find care for their war- wounds or their general medical needs. Yemen was the country where our teams treated the highest number of war-wounded in 2018, over 16,000 people. After a major offensive was launched in Hodeidah in June, doctors in our Aden hospital treated Hodeidah residents who had been driven for six hours, the majority of them in a critical condition. Conflict intensified on several frontlines at the end of the year, leading to an influx of people with war-related injuries. We also treated more than 150 people wounded by mines planted by Houthi-led Ansar Allah troops around Mocha. Constant attacks on our staff and patients at facilities in Ad Dhale forced us to withdraw from the town in November.

World: The Aid in Danger Monthly News Brief, May 2019

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Italy, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Singa...

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 27: 1 – 7 July 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 7 July 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 74 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 in Angola
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Dengue fever in Côte d’Ivoire
  • Humanitarian crisis in north-east Nigeria.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • A new case of genetically-distinct circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) has been confirmed in Cuvango district, Huila Province, central Angola. This is the second cVDPV2 outbreak in Angola in 2019, occurring over 1 000 kilometers away from the first event. The occurrence of this event (symbolic) and the increasing frequency of cVDPV2 emergence across the African Region is becoming a major public health issue, given the compromised sanitation situation, high population mobility and challenges faced by the national immunization programmes. While comprehensive responses are being undertaken, these events should serve to remind all countries in the African region of the importance of improving the quality of routine and supplementary immunization activities and maintain high levels of polio (and all other antigens) vaccination coverage to minimize the risk and consequences of poliovirus circulation.

  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with persistent low transmission intensity. The weekly incidence showed some reduction in the number of new confirmed EVD cases this week, albeit with a fluctuating pattern. All efforts to step up and sustain ongoing response operations need to continue.

World: Crop Monitor for Early Warning | July 2019

Source: GEOGLAM
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview:

In East Africa, production prospects are poor for main season cereals in parts of Somalia and Kenya due to a delayed onset of rains and dry conditions. In West Africa, main season maize planting continues across the south of the region and conditions are favourable with good rains received. In the Middle East and North Africa, winter wheat crops are generally favourable due to good rains throughout the season except in parts of Morocco where poor production has resulted from dry conditions, and in Syria and Iraq due to ongoing conflict. In Southern Africa, winter wheat planted in May is favourable, except in Zambia, where dry conditions have carried over from the previous season. In Central and South Asia, winter cereals for harvest in August are favourable despite some dry conditions in May. In Southeast Asia, harvest of dry-season rice is complete in the north and favourable yields resulted except in parts of Thailand and Philippines. Planting of wet-season rice is underway and conditions are favourable with good rains at the start of the season. In Central America and the Caribbean primera season planting started in May and there is some concern due to irregular rainfall and dry conditions.

World: 41 pays dans le monde, dont 31 en Afrique, ont besoin d’une aide alimentaire (FAO)

Source: UN News Service
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Les conflits prolongés et les mauvaises conditions climatiques exacerbent les besoins alimentaires, alerte l'Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture (FAO).

Selon le dernier rapport de la FAO sur les Perspectives de récoltes et la situation alimentaire publié jeudi, les conflits en cours et les sécheresses demeurent les principales causes de grave insécurité alimentaire, compromettant ainsi l'accès aux aliments et leur disponibilité pour des millions de personnes.

Le rapport indique que 41 pays, dont 31 en Afrique, ont toujours besoin d'une aide extérieure pour couvrir leurs besoins alimentaires, une situation inchangée depuis trois mois.

Les 41 pays ayant actuellement besoin d'une aide extérieure pour couvrir leurs besoins alimentaires sont l'Afghanistan, le Bangladesh, le Burkina Faso, le Burundi, le Cap Vert, le Cameroun, la République centrafricaine, le Tchad, le Congo, la Corée du Nord, la République démocratique du Congo, Djibouti, l'Erythrée, l'Eswatini, l'Ethiopie, la Guinée, Haïti, l'Iraq, le Kenya, le Lesotho, le Libéria, la Libye, Madagascar, le Malawi, le Mali, la Mauritanie, le Mozambique, le Myanmar, le Niger, le Nigéria, le Pakistan, le Sénégal, la Sierra Leone, la Somalie, le Soudan du Sud, le Soudan, la Syrie, l'Ouganda, le Venezuela, le Yémen et le Zimbabwe.

Le manque de pluies compromet la production alimentaire

En 2019, les dégâts causés par le cyclone Idai et le manque de pluies ont eu de lourdes répercussions sur la production agricole d'Afrique australe, dont celles de faire grimper les besoins d'importations en céréales. Les récoltes ont baissé pour la deuxième année consécutive au Zimbabwe et en Zambie, tandis que les pays voisins ont également enregistré des baisses de leur production en raison de conditions climatiques défavorables, comme par exemple au Mozambique avec le cyclone Idai. Au Zimbabwe, l'insécurité alimentaire devrait s'aggraver davantage en 2019, exacerbée par une forte hausse des prix des aliments de base et par la crise économique. Début 2019, près de 3 millions de personnes dans le pays étaient considérées comme étant en situation d'insécurité alimentaire.

En Afrique de l'Est, une grave sécheresse a affecté les récoltes de la première saison et conduit à une dégradation des conditions de pâturages. Les plus importantes baisses de production céréalière en 2019 sont attendues au Kenya, en Somalie et au Soudan où, d'après le rapport, les récoltes devraient être inférieures à la moyenne.

En Asie, des productions de blé et d'orge inférieures à la moyenne en 2018/19 sont attendues en Corée du Nord et des inquiétudes subsistent quant aux principales cultures saisonnières de 2019, en raison de pluies de plus en plus rares et de la faiblesse de la disponibilité en eau destinée à l'irrigation. Selon la récente mission rapide d'évaluation de la sécurité alimentaire de la FAO et du PAM de 2019, plus de 10 millions de personnes, soit 40 pour cent de la population, sont actuellement en situation d'insécurité alimentaire et ont besoin d'une aide alimentaire de manière urgente.

Les conflits chroniques ont de graves répercussions sur la sécurité alimentaire

Au Proche-Orient, malgré des conditions climatiques propices aux cultures, les conflits armés en cours en Syrie et au Yémen continuent d'entraver les activités agricoles en limitant la disponibilité des intrants et en augmentant les coûts de production. Au Yémen, lors de la période allant de décembre 2018 à janvier 2019, près de 15,9 millions de personnes, soit 53 pour cent de la population, faisaient face à une situation d'insécurité alimentaire aiguë.

De même, en Afrique, la situation désastreuse de la sécurité alimentaire dans de nombreux pays, y compris en République centrafricaine, en République démocratique du Congo et au Soudan du Sud, est le résultat de conflits persistants et de l'insécurité. Au Soudan du Sud, en particulier, selon certaines estimations, de mai à juillet 2019, le nombre de personnes en situation de grave insécurité alimentaire s'élevait à presque 7 millions, soit 60% de la population

World: Logistics Cluster Global ConOps Map (June 2019)

Source: Logistics Cluster
Country: Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Indonesia, Jordan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 2, July 2019

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA

Cyclone damage and rainfall deficits in 2019 caused significant production declines in Southern Africa, while in East Africa severe dryness reduced first season harvests and led to a degradation of rangeland conditions. Rainfall in West Africa is predicted to be below average, constraining production prospects.

ASIA Cereal production in 2019

in Far East Asia is forecast to rise marginally, mostly resting on a larger harvest in India. Similarly, in the Near East, despite damaging floods and persistent conflicts, production is set to increase for the region as a whole. Cereal production is also seen to increase in CIS Asia.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Significant production upturn is forecast in South America in 2019, compared to last year's reduced output. In Central America and the Caribbean, irregular rains have raised concerns over the maize harvests in all countries, except Mexico, where crop prospect are favourable.

World: Education in Danger Monthly News Brief, May 2019

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Saudi Ar...

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 26: 24 – 30 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 30 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 76 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived polio virus type 2 in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Hepatitis E in Namibia
  • Humanitarian crisis in Burkina Faso.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • Health authorities in Democratic Republic of the Congo reported two simultaneous events of genetically-distinct circulating vaccine-derived polio virus type 2 (cVDPV2) in Kasai and Sankuru provinces. In both events, two case-patients with acute flaccid paralysis were confirmed with geneticallylinked circulating vaccine derived poliovirus type 2. The two events become the fifth and sixth genetically-distinct cVDPV2 outbreaks in the country. While comprehensive responses are being undertaken, these events highlight the need to maintain high levels of routine polio vaccination coverage in all countries in the region to minimize the risk and consequences of any poliovirus circulation.
  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with insecurity incidents reported in Beni this week targeting Ebola response personnel. The weekly incidence showed minimum reduction in the number of new confirmed EVD cases this week, as the transmission intensity keeps fluctuating. All efforts to step up and sustain ongoing response operations need to continue.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 – Mid-Year Status Report (June 2019) [EN/AR/FR]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

As of 20 June 2019, the 22 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP), the Syria Regional Refugee & Resilience Plan (3RP), the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan and 2 Flash Appeals that make up the Global Humanitarian Overview require $26.42 billion to assist 106.3 million highly vulnerable people. This is approximately $1 billion more than requirements at the mid-year point in 2018. The increase from the GHO launch in December calling for $22 billion to assist 94 million people is primarily due to the finalization of several HRPs, the launch of two Flash Appeals for Madagascar and Zimbabwe, and a revised plan for Mozambique.

A wide and geographically diverse group of donors have provided $6.12 billion, or 23% of the full sum required this year. An additional $3.02 billion of humanitarian funding has been contributed, bringing total humanitarian funding to $9.14 billion. This is significantly less than the $11 billion reported by donors and humanitarian partners reported at the same period last year.

Humanitarian organizations urgently need another $20.3 billion to cover the activities and projects outlined in these response plans. Regional refugee response plans for Burundi, DRC, Nigeria, and South Sudan, together require $2.41 billion to respond to the needs of 4.6 million people. Other plans drawn up by the UN and partners for Burkina Faso, Bangladesh (Rohingya), DPR Korea, Iran, and Pakistan call for $1.37 billion to assist 9.1 million people.

Plans funded at under 20 per cent as of mid-June 2019 are those for Cameroon, Ethiopia, Haiti, Libya, Niger, Syria Regional Response, and Ukraine. Of these, the appeals for Haiti and Ukraine were also funded under 20 per cent the previous two years. Twenty-two of the 26 plans are funded under 30 per cent, compared to 15 in mid-2018.

High-level events designed to draw funding and discuss crucial policy issues were held for Syria and the region and Yemen. These events raised $9.62 billion for 2019 ($7 billion and $2.62 billion for the Syria crisis and Yemen, respectively). An additional $2.38 billion was mobilized for Syria and the region for 2020 and beyond. In May, donors and partners organized the first thematic pledging conference in Oslo. $363 million to prevent and respond to sexual and gender-based violence was pledged for 2019 and beyond, and meaningful political, policy and good practice commitments were made or reaffirmed.

In 2019, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has responded to the needs of people affected by natural disasters, drought, displacement, conflict and internal strife in 32 countries.
CERF has received $302.9 million in contributions and pledges.

The Emergency Relief Coordinator has approved a total of $318.4 million through the CERF this year. This amount consists of $193.7 million through the rapid response window, including $45 million in June for immediate scale-up to stave off the risk of famine in the Horn of Africa, and a record $124.9 million through the underfunded emergencies window for response in 13 underfunded emergencies.

This year, 24 donors have contributed and pledged $435 million to 18 country-based pooled funds (CBPF). Altogether, 603 projects implemented by 400 partners have received funding, for a total of $372 million. Almost three quarters of CBPF allocations this year have been disbursed to NGOs. CBPFs are notably the largest source of directly accessible funding to national and local NGOs, with the amount disbursed in 2018 increasing to $208 million (25% of total) from $62 million in 2014. Another quarter this year has been allocated to UN agencies and a smaller portion to Red Cross/Red Crescent organizations.

The number of multi-year plans has increased from 10 to 12 this year, including: Afghanistan, Cameroon, CAR, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Nigeria, oPt, Somalia, Sudan, Syria 3RP and Ukraine. Planning strategically over a longer timeframe aims to reduce humanitarian needs and strengthen the links between humanitarian, development and other actors.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 25: 17 – 23 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 23 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies
occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme
is currently monitoring 77 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key
new and ongoing events, including:

  • Cholera in Nigeria
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Ethiopia
  • Humanitarian crisis in South Sudan.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures
implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and
ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as
recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in North Kivu and Ituri provinces,
Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with fluctuating transmission
intensity. There has been a period of improved security recently, allowing
response teams to access communities and operate more freely. As a result,
indicators over the past few weeks provide early signs of an easing of the
transmission intensity in major hotspots. However, concerns remain over the
number of new cases still occurring in areas that previously had lower rates of
transmission. Additionally, the lack of funding to support response operations
has reached a worrying level. The international community must step up
funding to support the ongoing response and strengthen preparedness in
Democratic Republic of the Congo and neighbouring countries.

Health authorities in Nigeria have confirmed a new cholera outbreak in Adamawa
State, one of the three states in north-east Nigeria with prolonged complex
humanitarian emergencies. These states are vulnerable to experiencing large
cholera outbreaks, as has been seen in the recent past. It is therefore critical
that the current cholera outbreak is responded to swiftly at the initial stages
to prevent escalation of the situation.

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