Category: News and Press Release

South Sudan: Opening Remarks by Chairperson of the Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan at Press Conference

Source: UN Human Rights Council
Country: South Sudan

Yasmin Sooka, Chairperson of the CHRSS: Thank you for being present today. We value the opportunity to be able to speak to the South Sudanese community, and the international community through your work. The Commission was set up by the Human Rights Council in Geneva, and essentially our mandate is to determine the facts and circumstances of the violations which have taken place here, and related crimes, and also to collect and preserve evidence, with a view to dealing with impunity, and, of course, to assist the work of a future Hybrid Court, as well as the other mechanisms in Chapter 5 [of the Revitalized Peace Agreement]. The Commission presented a report to the Council in March, and also provided an oral update in September.

We have been very fortunate to have a team of investigators and researchers on the ground here in South Sudan; that has enabled us to be in touch with what is happening in the country. The way the Commission usually does these visits, we spend some time in Juba meeting with stakeholders, including the Government, a number of different institutions, and civil society. What we have also done is often visited different States in South Sudan, and usually we end by going to different refugee camps. Then finally we congregate in Addis where we are able to meet with the African Union, and relay to them questions people have had with regard to what the African Union is doing to promote accountability for South Sudan. As you know, they have the obligation to assist with setting up the Hybrid Court, to set up in Chapter 5 of the Agreement.

Yesterday, we met with Government officials, including the Cabinet Minister, the Minister of Defence, and the President of the Court Martial. We also met with members of the diplomatic corps here, the CTSAMVM [Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements] people and the National Dialogue people. This morning we had a meeting with civil society groups involved in the transitional justice working group. In terms of what we gathered from them, we really got the message that everybody is hopeful about the revitalized peace process. What everybody desperately wants is peace. There are people who talk about the fact that, and in the words of one civil society person, at this time they characterize the moment in the country as “no peace, no war”. At the same time they raise their fears that people are also continuing to forcibly recruit children, so that remains an abiding concern, how this peace can translate into real and durable peace.

In our discussions with the Government, the Commission is always wanting to raise the issues that concern them. We picked up on the question of the political detainees, and again we asked for a list of those people who had been released, and we also asked the Government to communicate around the two cases which have occupied people’s interest around why they have not been released. The Government also communicated to us that they also received from the ICRC [International Committee of the Red Cross] a list of the 18 people who had been released by the IO [Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-In-Opposition; SPLM-IO], that is also of interest to the Commission.

We congratulated the Government on the Terrain Trial, but also indicated to the Government that victims had written to us expressing two concerns. The one concern was around whether commanders would ever be prosecuted as they see the ones to be convicted as really the foot soldiers. The second issue we raised with the Government is the question of the compensation. As I understand it, the defence lawyers have already filed an appeal against the judgement in relation to the question of compensation. What is important about the Terrain Trial is that it demonstrates that the Government does have the capacity, and if there is political will, it can do these kinds of prosecutions of sexual and gender-based violence [SGBV] quite successfully. But it is one thing to do it in respect of international aid workers, and it is another issue when one looks at the question of many of the South Sudanese women who themselves have also been victims of this kind of heinous crimes. In that respect, again we asked for the list that the Government had promised us of the 200 cases of SGBV which they said had been dealt with by the military tribunals. Again we said it was important we look at that.

We also welcomed the Government indicating that they know there have been many requests from gender-based organizations that the Chief Justice set up a special court to deal with much of the violence around sexual and gender-based violence. As we know, when these kinds of crimes take place, they really linked to the question of the low status that women and children hold in a society. From that perspective it’s absolutely critical that side-by-side, with looking at the question of accountability, we also look at legal reform, and policy reform on how to ensure that the rights of women, and the status of women, are actually improved. These were some of the questions we raised with the Government.

We also expressed our gratitude to the Government for allowing us into the country. This Commission is in a unique position in the sense that it has been able to access, not just South Sudan, we have also been able to access refugees in camps across the neighbouring countries. That is very different in the way in which many different commissions work. That is also a tribute to the Government’s expressed commitment to the joint resolution that it sponsored in the Human Rights Council, which not only set the Commission up, but which also expressed this important note around collaboration.

Many of the people that we met on our last trip, both in South Sudan and in the neighbouring refugee camps, have all expressed their desire for peace. A farmer that I met said to me: “What I really want to do is to be able to go home. I don’t want to depend on aid. I don’t want food handouts. I could actually, if I am allowed to go home, and if I could live with peace and security, I could actually grow my own food and become total self-dependent.” This is the goal we need to have in our minds. When we think about the revitalized peace process, that it is not only about political leaps, but it is something that has to filter down to people at the grass roots level. That is going to take a different focus on this question of reconciliation. If it is going to translate into sustainable peace, it has to be about reconciliation at a communal level where communities find ways to live with each other again without fear.

Many of the people raised with us their concerns around the amnesties which have been characteristic of many of the peace processes in South Sudan. Many of the individuals we spoke to said: “It is not for the State to forgive. This is something that has to happen between individuals. And it has to be after there has been a full disclosure around who, what and why. We need to know what we have to forgive before we are actually able to do that.” These are two important messages that the Commission took away with it.

As we celebrate the fact that South Sudan is really looking at setting up a new transitional government, we are quite saddened by the recent attacks that took place in Bentiu. Before the Commission expresses any particular view, and there have been a number of statements going around in terms of the horror of what has happened, the fact that again you have had women targeted in ways that are particularly gruesome, and for which one needs to find those who are responsible so that they can be held accountable, at the same time it is really important to begin to do the fact-finding so that when we speak about it we speak about it in ways which are authentic to the experiences of women; and we have to really be careful that in the rush to do the right thing we actually don’t do any harm. That is really going to be able to inform the way the Commission looks at this matter. We did raise this question with the Government, who also said it happened in the Government-controlled areas. At the same time, they spoke about the fact that they believe there are many criminal elements out there. They also undertook to put a team together to investigate the matter. What we were really pleased about is that the Government indicated that they would provide the Commission with those facts, they would corroborate the findings that they make with the Commission. We see that as a positive step in taking the matter forward.

We also raised with many people the horrible case of a child, a young bride, whose virginity was auctioned off in a very public way, with somebody who was much older and much richer being able to pay for the bride price. In the photographs that we saw on Facebook, what is very clear was the fact that the young woman looked very, very unhappy. This is certainly an issue that one has to address, both in terms of CEDAW [Convention on the Discrimination against Women], and the fact that this kind of practice also continues to demean the status of women. That is something we are also going to pay attention to in the work that we carry forward.

Much of the Commission’s work was focused on Chapter 5 of the [Revitalized] Peace Agreement. While Chapter 5 has not been tampered with by the revitalized peace process, what certainly is happening is that there are different time periods that are now going to come into force around the setting up of the structures. From that perspective, the Commission has raised with the Government, and it will do so again in its afternoon meeting with another Government minister, the question of how we preserve the integrity around much of the implementation steps that have been taken around Chapter 5 already. This is certainly an issue that we will be looking to address when we speak to the African Union, because one of the issues that has been raised with us, besides the question of the time period, is also the needs to have the perspectives of those groups who have been outside of the process and whose views now need to be taken into account.

Our concern is to ensure that we address impunity, that we are able to set up the Commission on Truth, Healing and Reconciliation speedily, as well as the Hybrid Court, and certainly to look at the beginnings of the reparations and compensations authority. To do that one also needs political willingness, national ownership, and a conducive environment within which to do that. These are questions we will pick up with the Government.

The Commission was also encouraged to hear of the joint monitoring missions that have been carried out in former conflict areas in the country by the Government and the SPLA-IO. This is really important in order to build bridges. Since we were here last, South Sudan ratified the two Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child [on children in armed conflict, and on the sale of children child prostitution and child pornography]. This is quite critical when one looks at the question on forcible recruitment. That is an issue the Commission will certainly be looking at.

The Commission also met with the team dealing with the national dialogue, the Chairperson of the Commission [Standing Committee], and the two Rapporteurs. We were greatly encouraged by the National Dialogue’s notion that this is a bottoms-up process, and that they want to convey an uncensored message to the Government of what emerged. They also conceded that there were some areas that they did not get to; they did not get the views of people who support the opposition, and this is something they are looking forward to.

As we leave here, my colleague Andrew [Clapham, Commission member] will be remaining with the team for a few more days. I will be going to Khartoum and to Darfur to visit refugee camps. My colleague Barney [Afako, Commission member] is going back to Uganda to the refugee camps to again meet with new refugees. This will help us to deepen the strength of our work.

On Monday, we are going to celebrate Human Rights Day and the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. We would certainly like to celebrate and remember all of those human rights defenders and activists who continue to work for peace in South Sudan under incredibly difficult conditions. We also would like to support the work of victims and ensure that their voices are heard more powerfully. This is an issue that the Commission is going to give a lot of attention to in the next few months. How do we ensure that their voices are amplified and heard, so that they could be taken seriously in the processes going forward? Our eternal hope for South Sudan is peace so that people could return home and people could live with peace and security.

Thank you.

South Sudan: South Sudan Army Accused of ‘Brutal’ Sexual Violence

Source: Voice of America
Country: South Sudan

John Tanza

A group of human rights lawyers has filed a lawsuit against the government of South Sudan for sexual violence on behalf of 30 women and girls who were allegedly raped by members of the army and the presidential guard.

Antonia Mulvey, director of Legal Action Worldwide, a nonprofit network of human rights lawyers, said the South Sudan army committed “brutal” sexual violence, including sexual slavery, sexual torture, rape and gang rape against women and girls.

Mulvey says the complaint was lodged Thursday in Geneva at the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW).

“They [CEDAW] will review the complaint and a copy will be sent to the government of South Sudan for comment,” Mulvey said.

Scale of sexual violence

According to the LAW statement, the victims include a 12-year-old girl who witnessed the rape of two sisters and a neighbor after being raped herself.

Other allegations:

  • Scovi, 27 years old and a mother of four, was gang raped by five government soldiers.

  • Mary, 30 years old, was gang raped by four government soldiers in front of her children. After recovering, she fled with her children and was again gang raped by another group of soldiers, while the men and children in the group were made to watch.

  • Gloria, 24 years old, was gang raped by government soldiers in front of her two sons, aged five and two. Her husband later left her, saying she was infected with HIV.

LAW works in Africa, the Middle East and South Asia and predominantly focuses on addressing sexual violence through legal intervention. In Bangladesh, LAW is co-representing 400 Rohingya women and girls in their victims’ submission before the ICC.

“At this time, we can’t say this [South Sudan] case will go ICC. However, what we want to do by lodging this complaint to the U.N. committee is to remind the international community of the brutal sexual violence taking place on a daily level against tens of thousands of South Sudanese women and girls,” Mulvey said.

Government reaction

In response to the claim, presidential spokesman Ateny Wek Ateny said the LAW group wants to destabilize South Sudan.

“I think this group has a hidden agenda, given that the whole world is talking about this [September 12] peace agreement signed in Khartoum and Addis Ababa. There is a positive talk about the implementation of the peace agreement and this group (LAW) wants to put South Sudan back to polarization.”

Mulvey wasn’t surprised by the government’s reaction.

“The standard response, particularly to [accusations] of sexual violence, is to deny that it occurred in the first place,” Mulvey said.

Doctors Without Borders reported the attacks last week. The medical aid group said it treated 125 women and girls who were raped, beaten and brutalized in South Sudan’s Rubkona County between November 19-29.

South Sudan: Ambassador of Japan to South Sudan, the United Nations DSRSG/RC/HC, representatives of the National Mine Action Authority, and UNMAS Programme Manager visit Kasire Village in Rajaf

Source: Government of Japan, UN Mine Action Service, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in South Sudan
Country: Japan, South Sudan

Juba, 6 December 2018 – A high-level delegation of the Embassy of Japan in South Sudan, the United Nations, and th…

World: Un seul monde N° 4 / Décembre 2018 : LES DROITS HUMAINS SOUS PRESSION

Source: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, World

PAS DE SECURITÈ NI DE DEVELOPPEMENT SANS RESPECT DES DROITS HUMAINS

Un collegue arnericain me racontait recemment une discussion avec un diplomate originaire d’Asie de l’Est, après la guerre en Irak. II etait question, entre autres, de l’universalité des droits humains. “Ce principe peut-il faire débat?”, vous demanderez-vous peut-être. En français comme en anglais, l’intitulé du texte adopté à Paris it y a 70 ans manifeste, en effet, à lui seul la volonté de formuler des droits valables partout et pour tous: “Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme”.

Critiqués, des gouvernements ont régulierement, au cours des 70 derrieres annees, rétorqué que les droits humains étaient l’invention d’un Occident devoré par l’individualisme. Ainsi, dans une societe où les interets de la communauté priment ceux de l’individu, la validite de ces prérogatives n’est, selon eux, que relative.

Mon collegue fut surpris: son interlocuteur asiatique concéda en toute franchise que, dans son pays, personne n’avait jamais réellement accordé de crédit à cette rhetorique de la relativisation. Chacun sentait bien, au fond, qu’il était juste de denoncer le traitement brutal réserve aux dissidents par le pouvoir en place. Les révelations de tortures dans les prisons irakiennes, d’exécutions ciblées sans procès aucun et d’autres agissements des forces armées et de sécurité «occidentales», en contradiction éclatante avec les droits fondamentaux, ont marqué une césure radicale. De par son propre comportement, l’Occident a non seulement perdu sa légitimité à critiquer d’autres États, mais également ouvert la voie à une remise en question des droits humains.

On peut contester l’honnêteté du raisonnement. Il n’en demeure pas moins que des pays, qui se sont revendiqués des décennies durant comme garants des droits humains, se sont, dans une large mesure, discrédités. «Nous avons perdu notre grandeur morale», comme le relève mon collègue. «Sans développement, pas de sécurité; sans sécurité, pas de développement. Et ni l’un ni l’autre ne sont possibles sans le respect des droits humains», avait déclaré un jour l’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Kofi Annan, décédé en août dernier.

Dans cet esprit, la coopération suisse soutient plus de 50 projets visant à renforcer les droits humains dans des pays partenaires. L’accent est mis sur la bonne gouvernance, la transparence des décisions gouvernementales, l’État de droit ainsi que la participation de toutes les catégories de la population, en particulier les minorités et les femmes, aux processus politiques et sociaux. En Albanie et en Serbie, la DDC mène des projets en faveur des Roms. En Tunisie, dans la région des Grands Lacs d’Afrique et en Tanzanie, elle contribue à professionnaliser et à rendre indépendant le paysage médiatique local, en encourageant les journalistes à s’affirmer davantage en tant que contrepoids critique au pouvoir étatique. Lors de rencontres personnelles avec certains d’entre eux, dans le Sud-Kivu notamment, j’ai été profondément impressionné par leur courage et leur idéalisme.

Alors que l’«autorité morale» s’affaiblit à certains endroits, elle se renforce ailleurs. Dans les deux cas, la tendance ne va pas de soi. Dans les deux cas, elle n’est pas immuable.

Manuel Sager

Directeur de la DDC

World: Un seul monde N° 4 / Décembre 2018

Source: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, World

PAS DE SECURITé NI DE DEVELOPPEMENT SANS RESPECT DES DROITS HUMAINS

Un collegue arnericain me racontait recemment une discussion avec un diplomate originaire d’Asie de l’Est, après la guerre en Irak. II etait question, entre autres, de l’universalité des droits humains. “Ce principe peut-il faire débat?”, vous demanderez-vous peut-être. En français comme en anglais, l’intitulé du texte adopté à Paris it y a 70 ans manifeste, en effet, à lui seul la volonté de formuler des droits valables partout et pour tous: “Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme”.

Critiqués, des gouvernements ont régulierement, au cours des 70 derrieres annees, rétorqué que les droits humains étaient l’invention d’un Occident devoré par l’individualisme. Ainsi, dans une societe où les interets de la communauté priment ceux de l’individu, la validite de ces prérogatives n’est, selon eux, que relative.

Mon collegue fut surpris: son interlocuteur asiatique concéda en toute franchise que, dans son pays, personne n’avait jamais réellement accordé de crédit à cette rhetorique de la relativisation. Chacun sentait bien, au fond, qu’il était juste de denoncer le traitement brutal réserve aux dissidents par le pouvoir en place. Les révelations de tortures dans les prisons irakiennes, d’exécutions ciblées sans procès aucun et d’autres agissements des forces armées et de sécurité «occidentales», en contradiction éclatante avec les droits fondamentaux, ont marqué une césure radicale. De par son propre comportement, l’Occident a non seulement perdu sa légitimité à critiquer d’autres États, mais également ouvert la voie à une remise en question des droits humains.

On peut contester l’honnêteté du raisonnement. Il n’en demeure pas moins que des pays, qui se sont revendiqués des décennies durant comme garants des droits humains, se sont, dans une large mesure, discrédités. «Nous avons perdu notre grandeur morale», comme le relève mon collègue. «Sans développement, pas de sécurité; sans sécurité, pas de développement. Et ni l’un ni l’autre ne sont possibles sans le respect des droits humains», avait déclaré un jour l’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Kofi Annan, décédé en août dernier.

Dans cet esprit, la coopération suisse soutient plus de 50 projets visant à renforcer les droits humains dans des pays partenaires. L’accent est mis sur la bonne gouvernance, la transparence des décisions gouvernementales, l’État de droit ainsi que la participation de toutes les catégories de la population, en particulier les minorités et les femmes, aux processus politiques et sociaux. En Albanie et en Serbie, la DDC mène des projets en faveur des Roms. En Tunisie, dans la région des Grands Lacs d’Afrique et en Tanzanie, elle contribue à professionnaliser et à rendre indépendant le paysage médiatique local, en encourageant les journalistes à s’affirmer davantage en tant que contrepoids critique au pouvoir étatique. Lors de rencontres personnelles avec certains d’entre eux, dans le Sud-Kivu notamment, j’ai été profondément impressionné par leur courage et leur idéalisme.

Alors que l’«autorité morale» s’affaiblit à certains endroits, elle se renforce ailleurs. Dans les deux cas, la tendance ne va pas de soi. Dans les deux cas, elle n’est pas immuable.

Manuel Sager

Directeur de la DDC

World: Décisions de financement (HiPs)

Source: European Commission’s Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Iran (Islamic Republic of), occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, World

Les décisions de financement sont des actes juridiques adoptés par la Commission européenne dans le but d’autoriser ECHO à dépenser le budget de l’UE pour atteindre certains objectifs. Il s’agit d’une condition juridique obligatoire pour la signature d’accords avec les organisations humanitaires.

Les décisions de financement identifient, entre autres, la région de mise en œuvre, la crise humanitaire, les objectifs, les fonds disponibles et les partenaires potentiels pour aider ECHO à acheminer l’aide humanitaire. Les décisions sont fondées sur une évaluation des besoins.

Depuis 2012, la Commission européenne adopte chaque année une décision de portée mondiale qui couvre l’ensemble des actions d’aide humanitaire qu’ECHO prévoit de financer sur une période donnée, telles qu’elles sont expliquées dans la stratégie annuelle d’ECHO. Dans le cadre de cette décision mondiale, ECHO prépare et publie des Plans de mise en œuvre humanitaire (HIP), qui fournissent des informations plus détaillées sur les priorités opérationnelles identifiées dans les décisions mondiales sur la base de la stratégie annuelle.

Outre les Plans de mise en œuvre humanitaire, ECHO peut aussi allouer des fonds par le biais de décisions de première urgence, d’urgence ou ad-hoc. Plus d’informations sur le budget d’ECHO.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous la liste des décisions de financement ainsi que des liens vers les décisions des années précédentes. Plus d’informations à ce sujet sur le site web des partenaires.

Des réunions sont organisées tout au long de l’année pour inviter les partenaires à contribuer au processus des décisions de financement. Vous trouverez ici la liste des réunions prévues.

List of decisions

Djibouti: La 811ème réunion du Conseil de paix et de sécurité de l’UA sur les activités du Groupe de mise en œuvre de haut niveau de l’Union africaine (AUHIP) pour le Soudan, le Soudan du Sud et la Corne de l’Afrique

Source: African Union
Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan

Le Conseil de paix et de sécurité de l’Union africaine (UA), en sa 811ème réunion tenue le 22 novembre 2018, a adopté la décision qui suit sur les activités du Groupe de mise en œuvre de haut niveau de l’Union africaine (AUHIP) pour le Soudan, le Soudan du Sud et la Corne de l’Afrique:

Le Conseil,

  1. Prend note des communications faites par le Président du Groupe de mise en œuvre de haut niveau de l’Union africaine (AUHIP), S.E Thabo Mbeki, ancien Président de l’Afrique du Sud, et l’Ambassadeur Ramtane Lamamra, ancien Ministre des Affaires étrangères d’Algérie, sur les activités du Groupe de mise en œuvre, à savoir la situation au Soudan, au Soudan du Sud, les relations entre le Soudan et le Soudan du Sud, ainsi que la Corne de l’Afrique;

  2. Rappelle ses décisions antérieures sur les activités du Groupe de mise en oeuvre, notamment la décision Assembly/AU/Dec.472(XX) adoptée lors de la 20ème Session ordinaire de la Conférence de l’Union, tenue les 27 et 28 janvier 2013, les communiqués du CPS [PSC/AHG/COMM/2.(CCCXCVII)] et [PSC/PR/COMM.(DCCL)] adoptés lors de ses 397ème et 750ème réunions, tenues respectivement les 23 septembre et 6 février 2018, appelant à la nécessité de promouvoir une approche régionale et globale des défis à la paix, à la sécurité, à la stabilité et au développement dans la Corne de l’Afrique en partenariat avec l’IGAD;

  3. Se félicite des récents développements positifs dans la Corne de l’Afrique, en particulier la normalisation des relations entre la République démocratique fédérale d’Ethiopie et l’État d’Erythrée et entre la République de Djibouti et l’État d’Erythrée. Le Conseil se félicite également de la signature en septembre 2018 de l’Accord revitalisé pour la résolution du conflit en République du Soudan du Sud (R-ARCSS), sous la facilitation de l’IGAD et du Gouvernement du Soudan, qui a, entre autres, conduit à une amélioration des relations entre le Soudan et le Soudan du Sud. Par ailleurs, le Conseil se félicite en particulier de la décision prise par le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies 2444 (2018) de lever les sanctions à l’encontre de l’État d’Érythrée en réponse à ces développements positifs dans la région ;

  4. Félicite les membres du Groupe de mise en œuvre, S.E. Thabo Mbeki, S.E Abdulsalami Abubakar et S.E. Ramtane Lamamra et l’equipe de soutien pour s’être acquitté avec diligence de son vaste mandat confié par ce Conseil, qui consiste à aider le Soudan et le Soudan du Sud à surmonter les défis liés au conflit et à la transformation démocratique, ainsi qu’à la promotion de la paix et de la sécurité dans la Corne de l’Afrique. Le Conseil félicite également le Premier Ministre Abiy Ahmed, Président de l’IGAD, pour son soutien aux efforts du Groupe. Le Conseil exprime également ses remerciements aux Nations unies et à tous les autres partenaires pour les efforts constants qu’ils déploient dans le cadre des activités du Groupe de mise en œuvre et des pays de la Corne de l’Afrique;

  5. Félicite en outre le Gouvernement du Soudan pour les progrès accomplis dans le règlement des défis qui se posent au pays et l’exhorte avec les autres interlocuteurs soudanais à coopérer avec le Groupe de mise en œuvre dans ses efforts visant à relancer le processus de la feuille de route. À cet égard, le Conseil exhorte également les parties, en particulier le Gouvernement du Soudan, à assurer et à maintenir un cadre pouvant permettre à l’opposition et à tous les Soudanais de participer librement et efficacement à toutes les étapes des élections nationales de 2020 et au processus d’élaboration de la Constitution.

  6. Lance un appel au Gouvernement du Soudan et au Mouvement pour la justice et l’égalité (JEM) et à l’Armée du Mouvement de libération du Soudan/Minni Minawi (SLM-MM) pour qu’ils renforcent leur interaction avec la MINUAD, le Groupe de mise en œuvre et l’Etat de Qatar, afin de trouver une solution globale au conflit au Darfour sur la base du Document pour la paix au Darfour (DDPD) et dans le contexte de l’Accord sur la feuille de route;

  7. Se félicite du renouvellement continu par les parties soudanaises du cessez-le-feu et de la cessation des hostilités qu’elles ont proclamé unilatéralement au Soudan, et les exhorte à s’appuyer sur ces décisions pour conclure formellement des accords officiels de cessation durable des hostilités et parachever les négociations politiques et sécuritaires dans le contexte du processus de la feuille de route. À cet égard, le Conseil appelle l’Armée du Mouvement de libération du Soudan/Abdul Wahid (SLMA/Abdul Wahid) à proclamer de la même manière la cessation des hostilités et à se joindre d’urgence au processus politique visant à mettre définitivement fin au conflit au Darfour;

  8. Félicite le Gouvernement de transition du Soudan du Sud et toutes les parties au conflit dans le pays pour leur engagement à trouver une solution durable au conflit et à la signature du R-ARCSS. Le Conseil se félicite de la signature de l’Accord revitalisé pour la résolution du conflit au Soudan du Sud (R-ARCSS) par les membres du Comité ad hoc de l’UA pour le Soudan du Sud, en tant que Garants et prie tous les Garants de l’Accord et les autres parties prenantes à aider le peuple du Soudan du Sud dans sa quête d’une paix durable. Le Conseil exhorte les parties au R-ARCSS à maintenir leur engagement en faveur de la paix en coopérant les unes avec les autres pour la mise en œuvre de l’Accord;

  9. Le Conseil se félicite de l’assistance apportée par la République du Soudan du Sud, en appui au Groupe de mise en œuvre, en interagissant avec les parties soudanaises dans la recherche d’une solution aux conflits au Darfour et dans les Deux Régions et exhorte par conséquent les parties à interagir avec diligence, afin de parvenir à des accords crédibles, justes et durables pour résoudre les conflits;

  10. Encourage le Groupe de mise en œuvre à poursuivre son engagement, en étroite collaboration avec d’autres mécanismes de l’UA, afin de compléter les efforts de l’IGAD en appui à la transformation démocratique du Soudan du Sud et à la tâche vitale de construction nationale, en particulier à travers la mise en œuvre des processus envisagés par le R-ARCSS;

  11. Exhorte les gouvernements du Soudan et du Soudan du Sud à continuer de respecter les obligations qui sont les leurs en vertu de l’Accord de coopération (2012), en particulier en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la zone frontalière démilitarisée sécurisée (SDBZ), la démarcation de la frontière internationale et le parachèvement des négociations sur les zones contestées et revendiquées, et demande au Groupe de mise en œuvre d’intensifier son interaction avec les parties pour encourager la mise en œuvre rapide de ces engagements;

  12. Appelle les Présidents du Soudan et du Soudan du Sud à renforcer leur engagement en faveur de la coopération avec le Groupe de mise en œuvre sur le statut final de la région d’Abyei et encourage les dirigeants des deux États et des deux communautés des Ngok Dinka et Misseriya à s’engager mutuellement à continuer de contribuer au règlement du statut final de la région d’Abyei de manière à assurer la stabilité de la région d’Abyei. À cet égard, le Conseil exhorte les deux États à s’engager mutuellement et à donner mandat à leurs représentants dans le Comité conjoint de surveillance d’Abyei (AJOC), afin de débattre de la création des institutions intérimaires de la région d’Abyei et de prendre des décisions sur cette question, conformément à l’Accord relatif aux arrangements administratifs et sécuritaires provisoires pour la région d’Abyei de juin 2011;

  13. Se réjouit des contacts bilatéraux entre Djibouti et l’Erythrée et appelle les deux pays à poursuivre leur interaction en vue de trouver des solutions aux problèmes des soldats disparus et de la frontière entre les deux pays, conformément à la Résolution 2444 (2018), en vue de parvenir à une normalisation rapide de leurs relations, dans le contexte des efforts pour la paix, la sécurité, la stabilité et la réconciliation dans la Corne de l’Afrique ;

  14. Réitère sa demande au Groupe de mise en œuvre d’intensifier ses interactions dans la région en faveur d’une approche globale des questions stratégiques liées à la paix, à la sécurité et au développement dans la Corne de l’Afrique et, par conséquent, pour promouvoir et maintenir des partenariats multilatéraux entre l’UA, l’IGAD, les Nations unies et les organisations interétatiques de la péninsule arabique, au nom de la Commission de l’Union africaine, en pleine consultation avec le Président en exercice de l’Union africaine, le Commissaire à la paix et à la sécurité et le Président de l’IGAD;

  15. Se félicite de l’approche holistique adoptée par le Groupe de mise en œuvre de haut niveau dans la mise en œuvre de ce mandat, qui comprend la convocation de la Conférence convenue sur la paix, la sécurité, la stabilité, la coopération et le développement dans la Corne de l’Afrique (CPHA), visant à parvenir à un consensus sur une approche globale des défis de la région. Le Conseil se félicite en outre de l’intention du Groupe de mise en œuvre d’étendre la participation à la CPHA, aux États de la région de la Mer Rouge, de la péninsule arabique et d’autres parties prenantes internationales concernées et demande au Groupe de mise en œuvre de poursuivre ses consultations avec toutes les parties prenantes régionales et internationales concernées lors de l’organisation de cette conférence;

  16. Demande au Groupe de mise en œuvre de haut niveau de poursuivre la mise en œuvre de son plan d’action, y compris l’interaction avec la région et des États de la péninsule arabique, et de conduire ses recherches et consultations, afin d’assurer que ses propositions en vue d’une approche globale et inclusive des dynamiques complexes de la Corne sont fermement ancrées dans une analyse crédible qui étayera l’articulation d’une perspective véritablement africaine sur les défis de la Corne. Dans ce contexte, le Conseil demande au Groupe de mise en œuvre de soumettre au Conseil un rapport trimestriel sur les progrès accomplis, avec un rapport détaillé après la tenue de la CPHA;

  17. Demande en outre au Président et à la Commission de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour mobiliser le soutien financier et autre nécessaire, afin de permettre au Groupe de mise en œuvre de mettre en œuvre plus efficacement son mandat;

  18. Décide de renouveler le mandat du Groupe de mise en œuvre de haut niveau de l’Union africaine pour le Soudan et le Soudan du Sud, pour une période, de douze (12) mois à compter du 31 décembre 2018;

  19. Décide de rester saisi de la question.