Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Protection and Human Rights”

Ethiopia: Ethiopia Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 72 | 7 – 20 January 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

HIGHLIGHTS

• Scaled-up response urgently required to more than 250,000 IDPs in Western Ethiopia

• Durable Solutions as nexus opportunity in Somali region: Lessons from SDC

• New law grants nearly a million refugees to exercise more rights in Ethiopia

• Nearly 36 million children in Ethiopia are poor and lack access to basic social services: report

• Humanitarian funding update

Humanitarian Coordianator calls for a scale-up response to displacement crisis in Western Ethiopia

The United Nations Humanitarian/Resident Coordinator (HC/RC a.i.) for Ethiopia Mr. Aeneas Chuma has called for a scaled-up response to an estimated 250,000 people displaced from Benishangul Gumuz into east/west Wollega zones of Oromia region and within Benishangul Gumuz region. The HC/RC reminded the Ethiopia Humanitarian Country Team (EHCT) members that very limited presence of operational partners coupled with constrained security in western Ethiopia has negatively impacted the response to immediate life-saving and protection needs of IDPs. On 14 January 2019, a mission led by the HC/RC visited Gomma Factory site in Nekemte town and two IDPs sites in Belo area of Sasiga woreda and observed that IDPs face shortage of food, shelter, and medicine. The visit also witnessed as many as 600 persons are confined in a hall in the IDP sites-posing serious protection concerns. Lack of access to education for IDPs children is also one area that needs to be addressed immediately. Humanitarian partners have been constrained from accessing five woredas in Kamashi zone, Oda Woreda of Assosa zone, and Mau Kumo Special Woreda in Benishangul Gumuz region due to the ongoing tense security situation in the areas.

The humanitarian community will continue to work with the Government of Ethiopia through the National Disaster Risk Management Commission (NDRMC) and the Oromia Disater Risk Management Commission to expand the emergency operation in east and west Wollega to boost the coordination structure.

Durable Solutions as nexus opportunity in the Somali region: Lessons from SDC

The dramatic growth in the volume, cost, and length of humanitarian assistance for over a decade in Ethiopia, in large part due to the protracted nature of crises, has given prominence to the long-standing discussion around better connectivity between humanitarian and development efforts. The largest number of stakeholders at the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) identified the need to strengthen the humanitarian-development nexus against the backdrop of the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

As Ethiopia is moving towards a multi-year strategy in which humanitarian and development actors envision a collective outcome in a given period of time, countries like Switzerland are already implementing a durable solution to IDPs in Somali region. The Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC) in Ethiopia has been working in the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia since 2015. For SDC nexus has become one of the priority themes in the region motivated by the context where incidences of disasters have increased alongside the ever-weakened coping mechanisms of communities and weak government capacities requiring coherent approaches particularly in the Somali region.

Resilience building is an opportunity to secure sustainability linked to Agenda 2030 and achieve the objective to “Leave No-one Behind”. The SDC’s migration and protection programme engagement in building resilience in the Somali region includes supporting the government to find durable solutions for the displaced population and host communities. The support focuses on improving the wellbeing of IDPs through enhanced information management, capacity building, policy development and advocacy towards durable solutions. By supporting the regional government, SDC is strengthening the Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG), established in 2014. Under the leadership of the regional Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Bureau (DPPB), and International Organization for Migration (IOM), SDC reactivated the group in 2016. The engagement with the Group has resulted in the development and endorsement of a Somali Region Durable Solutions Strategy. The group conducted multi-agency assessments in IDP relocation sites to inform partners on programming, and IDP intention survey in 10 conflict-induced IDP sites with Durable Solutions principles integrated.

The SDC support provided capacity building training for Somali regional sector bureaus on existing international, regional and national conventions, legal provisions, policies and strategies on the rights of IDPs including their rights for achieving durable solutions. The SDC will continue its work in the region to implement IDPs voluntary return, local integration and resettlement activities based on the interests of IDPs and host communities. It will deploy technical experts on Durable Solutions both at the regional and federal levels and will conduct IDP intention survey data collection activities in 45 IDP sites between January and April 2019.

Other areas where the SDC is looking at the nexus approach are through its health and food security programmes. The health programme focuses on improving access to the most vulnerable population i.e. pastoralist communities, to affordable high-quality health care in the Somali region. Focus is given to ‘One Health’ to improve the well-being of pastoralists through improving the governance and service delivery of the three sectors/pillars that pastoralism stands on i.e. livestock, people and natural resources management. To this end, a new thirteen and half year’s project will be launched in March 2019, which encompasses a crisis modifier as a rapid response to protect the developmental gains through early action for communities. The SDC’s food security resilience-building program aims at ensuring resilient and sustainable livelihoods and food security of the drought-prone pastoralists and agro-pastoralists in collaboration with the German Development Cooperation (GIZ) and the Ministry of Agriculture in collaboration, the Bureau of Livestock and Pastoralist Development (BoLPD) and Bureau of Agriculture & Natural Resources Development (BoLNRD).

New law grants more rights to refugees in Ethiopia

The House of Peoples' Representatives of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia on Tuesday (15 January 2019) passed a law that allows refugees in Ethiopia to exercise more rights. The law allows refugees to move out of the camps, attend regular schools and to travel and work across the country. They can also formally register births, marriages and deaths, and will have access to financial services such as bank account. Ethiopia’s revision of its refugee law comes just weeks after the UN General Assembly agreed to the Global Compact on Refugees on 17 December 2018. The New legislation is part of the “Jobs Compact— a US$500 million program which aims to create 100,000 jobs — 30 percent of which will be allocated to refugees.

Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA) said the new law would enhance the lives of refugees and host communities. The UN Refugee Agency welcomes Ethiopia’s historic new refugee law in a press statement released on 18 January 2019. “The passage of this historic law represents a significant milestone in Ethiopia’s long history of welcoming and hosting refugees from across the region for decades,” said Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees. “By allowing refugees the opportunity to be better integrated into society, Ethiopia is not only upholding its international refugee law obligations, but is serving as a model for other refugee-hosting nations around the world.”

Ethiopia currently hosts over 900,000 refugees, primarily from neighbouring South Sudan, Somalia, Sudan and, Eritrea, as well as smaller numbers of refugees from Yemen and Syria, making it Africa's second largest refugee population next Uganda. For more on this: https://reliefweb.int/node/2955609/

Nearly 36 million children in Ethiopia are poor and lack access to basic social services: new report

A joint press release by the Central Statistical Agency and UNICEF Ethiopia indicates that an estimated 36 million of a total population of 41 million children under the age of 18 in Ethiopia are multi-dimensionally poor, meaning they are deprived of basic goods and services in at least three dimensions. Titled “Multi-dimensional Child Deprivation in Ethiopia - First National Estimates,” the report studied child poverty in nine dimensions – development/stunting, nutrition, health, water, sanitation, and housing. Other dimensions included education, health related knowledge, and information and participation.

The study finds that 88 per cent of children in Ethiopia under the age of 18 (36 million) lack access to basic services in at least three basic dimensions of the nine studied, with lack of access to housing and sanitation being the most acute. The study reveals that there are large geographical inequalities: 94 per cent children in rural areas are multi-dimensionally deprived compared to 42 per cent of children in urban areas. Across Ethiopia’s regions, rates of child poverty range from 18 per cent in Addis Ababa to 91 per cent in Afar, Amhara, and SNNPR. Poverty rates are equally high in Oromia and Somali (90 per cent each) and Benishangul-Gumuz (89 per cent). For more on this: https://reliefweb.int/node/2953869/

Ethiopia: Ethiopia – Inter-communal fighting in South Sudanese refugee camps (DG ECHO, DG ECHO partners) (ECHO Daily Flash of 21 January 2019)

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Ethiopia, South Sudan

  • In early January, inter-community fighting between two sub-clans of the Nuer community (Gajiok vs Gajaak) broke out in Kule refugee camp, spreading to Tierkidi and Nguenyyiel camps in Gambella Region, Ethiopia. An unknown number of people were killed or injured and several thousand displaced. The Gajiok sub-clan have reportedly left the Kule camp following the burning of their shelters. 800 have fled to Pamdong reception centre and others to areas within the host community.

  • Wounded people were treated by humanitarian partners and local health structures. The water supply has been cut off following additional damage to the pipeline in the Kule camp during the night of 16/17 January. Food distribution has been suspended in the three camps and refugees have access to limited humanitarian assistance.

  • Partners in South Sudan highlighted increasing tensions between the same communities in the area bordering Ethiopia, following the incident in the Gambella Camps.

  • There are over 400 000 refugees from South Sudan in Gambella region. DG ECHO is providing assistance through its partners in the sector of food, nutrition, shelter, WASH, protection and education, with a focus on recent arrivals.

South Sudan: Support children to attend school in the Mangaten domestic refugee camp (Distribution of school goods in an elementary school)

Source: Japan International Volunteer Center
Country: South Sudan
[Original by Takaki IMAI, President (August 28, 2018); Translated by K. Adachi/S. Altman]

There is an elementary school for the children of refugees in Camp 1.

The roof of the classroo...

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 fin Décembre 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

South Sudan: Working their way out of war

Source: Save the Children
Country: South Sudan

South Sudan's children building a future without conflict.

It is now more than five years since the start of a brutal conflict in South Sudan, which has devastated the lives of millions of children.Some have been killed, maimed, subjected to sexual violence and recruited into armed groups. Over 70% of children are out of school and only 16% of girls over the age of 15 can read or write.

But now children are overcoming the distresses of war and learning new vocational skills through Save the Children’s Youth and Livelihoods project. The programme in Rumbek reduces poverty and gives youth an alternative to join criminal activities such as cattle raiding, revenge killings, road ambush and combatants. It gives young people aged 14-25 essential training, education and vocational skills including carpentry, welding and hairdressing, so they can begin rebuilding their lives and carve out a brighter future.

Salah*, aged 17, is a former child soldier shot in the fighting. He is now training as a barber. He says: “During the fighting, I saw many people shot dead. When you fight, the people you are fighting are human beings like you. When I was shot, in that moment, I was thinking I regret joining the fighting and if I die my siblings will lose a brother and my mother will lose a son – and I would not be able to help them.”

“I think my future will be good. For me and my sisters and brothers I will keep practising hairdressing. And I hope to earn money so I can return to school.”

Theresa*, aged 17, trained as a welder to support her family. She says: “The conflict has hit us hard. In 2017 two armed groups took everything – our food and clothes. Two of my cousins were killed as they tried to defend our home…. I was lucky not to be there because they were looking for young girls they came looking, asking “are there any young girls in there?"

"The first time I put on my overalls I was so happy. It was hard before, trying to do welding with one hand while holding your skirt with the other as you bent down! But now we feel totally free to get on with our work. Maybe no other girl has ever put on overalls and come to a place like this centre. I feel proud when I come here. This place is a place of freedom", said Theresa*.

Save the Children’s Deputy Country Director in South Sudan, Arshad Malik said: “Many of South Sudan’s children have known nothing but war and suffering, in a conflict that has devastated millions of lives. The rights of children continue to be violated with impunity and their futures destroyed. By sharing the stories of these amazing children and what they have overcome in their lives, we want to provide a message of hope that this country so desperately needs. Young people are the future of South Sudan and we must invest in them and provide them with an escape from the cycle of violence engulfing their lives. We can’t change a child’s past, but together, we can change their future’’

Over 1300 children have been through this programme funded by the European since 2013. More than 80 per cent of last year’s cohort have already found stable employment in their chosen trades. Thanks to our donor, the European Union.

Writen by: Tito Justin

World: L’UE renforce son aide humanitaire – budget record adopté pour 2019

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Bruxelles, le 16 janvier 2019

Alors que le nombre de personnes frappées par des crises humanitaires dans le monde ne cesse de grossir, l'UE a adopté pour 2019 un budget initial annuel pour l'aide humanitaire sans précédent, d'un montant de 1,6 milliard d'euros.

Entre conflits régionaux de longue durée au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique et incidence grandissante du changement climatique sur la planète, les crises humanitaires s'aggravent, tandis que les combats compromettent le bon acheminement de l'aide aux plus nécessiteux.

«Ce nouveau budget maintient l'UE en tête des pourvoyeurs d'aide humanitaire face aux crises telles que celles que traversent actuellement la Syrie et le Yémen. S'il est vrai que l'aide humanitaire ne peut à elle seule résoudre tous les problèmes, nous n'en devons pas moins tout mettre en œuvre pour venir en aide aux plus vulnérables. C'est notre devoir humanitaire. Nous devons aussi avoir à l'esprit les conséquences de toutes ces crises sur les enfants, sur la prochaine génération. D'où la part record de 10 % du nouveau budget, soit 10 fois plus qu'en 2015, consacrée à l'éducation dans les situations d'urgence, afin que nous puissions donner aux enfants les outils leur permettant de construire un avenir meilleur,» a déclaré Christos Stylianides, commissaire chargé de l'aide humanitaire et de la gestion des crises.

L'essentiel du budget servira à faire face à la crise en Syrie, à aider les réfugiés dans les pays voisins et à apporter des réponses à la situation extrêmement critique que connaît le Yémen. En Afrique, l'aide de l'UE soutiendra les populations des régions touchées par des crises au Soudan du Sud, en République centrafricaine, dans le bassin du lac Tchad et en République démocratique du Congo, cette dernière étant frappée par une épidémie d'Ebola, ainsi que des régions souffrant de crises alimentaires et nutritionnelles, comme le Sahel.

En Amérique latine, le financement de l'UE aidera les populations les plus vulnérables touchées par la crise au Venezuela et victimes du conflit de longue date en Colombie. L'Union européenne continuera aussi à acheminer de l'aide en Afghanistan et à assister la population rohingya, tant au Myanmar/en Birmanie qu'au Bangladesh. En Europe, les efforts humanitaires consentis par l'UE seront principalement axés sur les personnes victimes du conflit en Ukraine.

En raison des effets de plus en plus marqués du changement climatique, cette enveloppe aidera les communautés vulnérables dans les pays exposés aux catastrophes à mieux se préparer aux différents chocs climatiques, tels que les sécheresses, les inondations et les cyclones.

Contexte

L'aide humanitaire de l'UE est à la fois impartiale et indépendante. Elle est accordée uniquement sur la base des besoins et dans le respect des principes d'humanité, de neutralité, d'impartialité et d'indépendance. Grâce à son aide humanitaire, l'UE vient à la rescousse de millions de personnes en détresse dans le monde entier. L'aide de l'UE est mise en œuvre par l'intermédiaire d'organisations humanitaires partenaires, dont les agences des Nations unies, des organisations non gouvernementales et des organismes de la Croix-Rouge, qui ont signé des accords de partenariat avec la Commission européenne. La Commission suit de près l'utilisation qui est faite des fonds de l'UE grâce à son réseau mondial d'experts humanitaires et a mis en place des règles strictes pour s'assurer que les fonds alloués sont dépensés à bon escient.

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.