Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Senegal”

World: Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Flow Monitoring Survey Results (January to December 2018) Profile of Female Migrants – 2018

Source: International Organization for Migration
Country: Albania, Algeria, Benin, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Italy, Kenya, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Montenegro, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Romania, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Spain, the Republic of North Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, World

OVERVIEW

The flow monitoring surveys are part of the IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) data collection activities in West and Central Africa, East and Horn of Africa, Libya and Europe (Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Kosovo, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania and Spain), that are conducted within the framework of IOM’s research on populations on the move through Africa, the Mediterranean and Western Balkan. Data was collected between January and December 2018 in the above mentioned countries.

Migrants on the move are interviewed by IOM field teams; the surveys collect information on migrants’ profiles, including age, sex, areas of origin, levels of education and employment status before migration, key transit points on their route, cost of the journey, reasons for moving and
intentions.

The present brief highlights of some of the main characteristics of women migrants of 39 nationalities from West and Central Africa, North Africa, East and Horn of Africa, Middle East and the Gulf Cooperation Council. Further information about the questionnaire, sampling and survey implementation can be found on DTM Methodological Framework.

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 28-February-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, ...

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 1, March 2019

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

COUNTRIES REQUIRING EXTERNAL ASSISTANCE FOR FOOD

FAO assesses that globally 41 countries, of which 31 are in Africa, continue to be in need of external assistance for food.
Conflict remains the main driver of high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather‑induced production declines and economic instability have also adversely impacted on food availability and access.

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA

Mostly reflecting beneficial weather conditions, production upturns were estimated in East, West and North Africa in 2018, while rainfall deficits cut outputs in Southern Africa. Continued poor rains have also affected the development of the 2019 crops in parts of Southern Africa, while conflicts in several other countries continue to curtail production prospects this year.

ASIA

Cereal production in 2018 in Far East Asia is estimated at a record high.
By contrast, outputs fell in the Near East and CIS Asia on account of rainfall deficits and the impact of conflicts in parts of the Near East. Production prospects for the soon‑to‑be harvested 2019 wheat crop are generally favourable across the region.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Cereal production is expected to increase in South America in 2019, recovering from last year’s reduced output. In Central America and the Caribbean, despite localized dry weather conditions, cereal outputs in 2018 were close to the average. The 2019 wheat crop in Mexico is likely to remain below average.

Libya: Libya: Activities at Disembarkation, Monthly Update – February 2019

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Guinea, Libya, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

Libya continues to be a transit point for departure from North Africa towards Europe. UNHCR's interventions at disembarkation points in Libya focus on the provision of life-saving assistance and protection monitoring, to identify persons in need of international protection, as well as vulnerable individuals, such as unaccompanied and separated children, elderly, medical cases, women at risk or victims of trafficking. UNHCR through its partner International Medical Corps provides medical services and core relief items. In addition, UNHCR rehabilitated WASH facilities at six disembarkation points, in Azzawya, Tripoli (3), Tajoura (Al Hamidiyah) and Alkhums.

As of 28 February 2019, the Libyan Coast Guard rescued/intercepted a total of 778 people in different locations along the Libyan coast. Last year the LCG rescued/intercepted a total of 15,235 refugees and migrants at sea. So far in 2019, Libyan local authorities have recovered 8 bodies of people who perished while attempting to cross the Mediterranean towards Europe, while 138 people were reported missing.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

World: Global Price Watch: January 2019 Prices (February 28, 2019)

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Chad, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Mali, Mexico, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uganda, World, Yem...

World: Mapping SUN Movement Networks in 17 fragile and conflict-affected states: A snap shot of developments and progress

Source: Emergency Nutrition Network
Country: Bangladesh, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

Background

Founded in 2011, the S...

Libya: Libya: Activities at Disembarkation, Monthly Update – January 2019

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Guinea, Libya, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

Libya continues to be a transit point for departure from North Africa towards Europe. UNHCR's interventions at disembarkation points in Libya focus on the provision of life-saving assistance and protection monitoring, to identify persons in need of international protection, as well as vulnerable individuals, such as unaccompanied and separated children, elderly, medical cases, women at risk or victims of trafficking. UNHCR through its partner International Medical Corps provides medical services and core relief items. In addition, UNHCR rehabilitated WASH facilities at six disembarkation points, in Azzawya, Tripoli (3), Tajoura (Al Hamidiyah) and Alkhums.
In January 2019, the Libyan Coast Guard rescued/intercepted a total of 469 people in different locations along the Libyan coast. Last year the LCG rescued/intercepted a total of 15,235 refugees and migrants at sea. So far in 2019, Libyan local authorities have recovered 2 bodies of people who perished while attempting to cross the Mediterranean towards Europe.

Niger: Niger: Evaluation multisectorielle des besoins des migrants dans la ville d’Agadez, Janvier 2019

Source: REACH Initiative
Country: Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Sudan, Sudan

RESUME

Située aux portes du Sahara au nord du Niger, la ville d’Agadez s...

World: Humanitarian Funding Update January 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

2018 Humanitarian Funding Update: looking back at 2018

Since reports on 2018 funding continue to be received well into the first quarter of 2019, this month’s update includes data for last year. At the end of December 2018, US$24.93 billion were required to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need through 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP). At that point, the plans were funded at $14.58 billion, 58.5% of funding requirements. Additional contributions reported in January 2019 bring the total funding figure for UN-led plans to $15.07 billion, 60.5% of funding requirements.

Global requirements for 2018 were $230 million higher than for December 2017. The amount of funding reported against UN-coordinated appeals for 2018 as at 31 January 2019 is $78 million higher than the amount reported for 2017 as at end January 2018.

The perspective for 2019

The GHO 2019 published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans, the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). As at the end of January, with the inclusion of the Madagascar Flash Appeal (November 2018 – April 2019), requirements have reached $21.93 billion. These figures do not include those for the Syria HRP, which will be published at a later date.

The GHO 2019 outlined plans to assist an estimated 93.6 million of 131.7 million people assessed to be in need in 2019, as opposed to 97.9 million of 133.3 million people in need at the end of 2018. The Madagascar Flash Appeal (November 2018 – April 2019), the Mozambique Plan (November 2018 - June 2019) and the Venezuela RMRP – all newly tracked – together add 3.36 million people to those to receive humanitarian aid this year.

In 2019, the number of people in need and to receive assistance is higher than last year in five countries (Cameroon, Ethiopia, Myanmar, the Philippines and Yemen) and lower in nine countries (Bangladesh, Burundi, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Somalia).

As of the end of January 2019, an estimated 95.1 million of 134.1 million people in need are expected to require assistance in 2019.

Plans were finalized in January 2019 for the Central African Republic (CAR), Nigeria, Somalia and Ukraine.

On 7 January, the Government of the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Humanitarian Country Team officially launched the Central African Republic HRP 2019, requesting $430.7 million to assist 1.7 million extremely vulnerable Central Africans. The Humanitarian Coordinator called upon donors to help mobilize funding for CAR to consolidate achievements of previous years and to support humanitarian response in 2019; 900,000 people were provided with humanitarian assistance through the CAR HRP in 2018.

World: To Walk the Earth in Safety (2018): Documenting the United States’ Commitment to Conventional Weapons Destruction

Source: US Department of State
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Georgia, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Micronesia (Federated States of), Montenegro, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Palau, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

"This 17th Edition of To Walk the Earth In Safety summarizes the United States' CWD programs in 2017. CWD assistance provides the United States with a powerful and flexible tool to help partner countries manage their stockpiles of munitions, destroy excess small arms and light weapons (SA/LW) and clear explosive hazards such as landmines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and UXO. Our assistance also helps countries destroy or enhance security of their man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS) and their threat to civilian aviation, in addition to other weapons and munitions. ... Thanks to the U.S. Congress’ bipartisan support and support of the American people, we can attest that our goal remains one where all may walk the earth in safety." -- Message From Under Secretary Andrea Thompson

World: CrisisWatch January 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indon...

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 fin Décembre 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update December 2018 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

At the end of December 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) required US$24.93 billion to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The requirements remained unchanged as of the end of November 2018. The plans are funded at $14.58 billion which amounts to 58.5 per cent of financial requirements for 2018. Notably, the percentage of total funding contributed through humanitarian response plans carried out by the UN with partners in 2018 is estimated at 62.9%. This is higher than at any time in the last ten years except 2017 (66.2 per cent). The plans were funded at $14.58 billion which amounted to 58.5 per cent of financial requirements for 2018.

Global requirements finished the year $230 million higher than for December 2017, and the amount of funding reported against UN-coordinated appeals at the end of 2018 was $78 million higher than at this time last year.

To make information on vulnerable people’s needs, planned response, funding and funding gaps in humanitarian crises accessible to all in one place, on 4 December, OCHA announced the launch of a new web-based portal, Humanitarian Insight.

Pooled Funds

With $945 million received from 32 Member States, one crown dependency and the general public through the UN Foundation, 2018 became the fifth consecutive year of record-high contributions received for country-based pooled funds (CBPFs). The increased contributions to CBPFs are testament to donors’ trust in this funding mechanism as a tool for principled, transparent and inclusive humanitarian assistance. Globally, a total of $756 million was allocated during the calendar year to 1,334 projects implemented by 657 partners, with two-thirds of overall CBPF allocations disbursed to NGOs. Over 24 percent were directly allocated to local and national NGOs, amounting to some $183 million. Health, emergency shelter and non-food items, water, sanitation and hygiene, food security, nutrition and protection were the largest funded sectors during 2018. In 2018, the Yemen Humanitarian Fund became the largest CBPF ever, allocating $188 million to 53 partners implementing 112 projects. The country-based funds in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, South Sudan and Turkey each allocated over $50 million.

Between 1 January and 31 December 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved the largest amount of funding from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) in a single year with a total of $500 million. This includes $320 million from the Rapid Response Window and $180 million from the Underfunded Emergencies Window, for life-saving activities in 49 countries. In December, a total of $12.8 million was released to assist Congolese returnees and people expelled from Angola, to meet needs outstanding since the October earthquake in Haiti, and to support people affected by flooding in Nigeria.

Specific appeal information

On 17 December, the Palestinian Authority and the Humanitarian Coordinator for the occupied Palestinian territory launched the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) for $350 million to address critical humanitarian needs of 1.4 million Palestinians in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, including East Jerusalem. A full 77 per cent of the requested funds target Gaza where the humanitarian crisis has been aggravated by a massive rise in Palestinian casualties due to demonstrations. Israel’s prolonged blockade, the internal Palestinian political divide and recurrent escalations of hostilities necessitate urgent humanitarian assistance for people assessed as being most in need of protection, food, health care, shelter, water and sanitation in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

A three-month Operational Plan for Rapid Response to Internal Displacement issued on 31 December seeks $25.5 million to reach civilians displaced by inter-communal violence in Ethiopia. The plan focuses exclusively on addressing health, nutrition, education, water, sanitation and hygiene, non-food items, protection and agriculture issues related to recent violence-induced displacements around Kamashi and Assoss (Benishangul Gumuz region) and East and West Wollega (Oromia region). Nearly 250,000 people have been displaced in these regions since September 2018. The plan has been developed to bridge the period between now and the official launch of the 2019 Humanitarian and Disaster Resilience Plan (HDRP). The needs and requirements for the Benishangul Gumuz-East/West Wollega response will be included in the HDRP.

On 13 December, Assistant-Secretary-General/Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator (ASG/DERC) Ursula Mueller delivered a statement to the Security Council on the humanitarian situation in Ukraine, where more than 3,000 civilians have been killed and up to 9,000 injured since conflict began in 2014. The crisis affects over 30 per cent of elderly people in the country, the highest proportion of people in this category in the world. The 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan, which required $187 million, was only 32 per cent funded. Without adequate funds, food, healthcare, water and sanitation, and other life-saving assistance cannot be provided.

During a 14 December briefing the USG/ERC and the Special Envoy for Yemen urged the Security Council to act swiftly to ensure full implementation of the Stockholm Agreement to demilitarize ports in the country. The agreement requires mutual withdrawal of forces from Hodeida city and its ports and a governorate-wide ceasefire to allow desperately needed humanitarian assistance to flow. The USG/ERC encouraged all parties to continue to engage seriously in implementing the multiple agreements reached in Sweden. The Government of Yemen requires billions of dollars in external support for its 2019 budget, and in parallel this year’s humanitarian response plan for Yemen requests $4 billion, about half of it for emergency food assistance.

On 11 December at a meeting in New York on the gravity of the humanitarian situation in the Central African Republic, OCHA reiterated that response to this crisis is a priority for the organization and announced that in 2019 a high-level meeting will be arranged to address the impact of underfunding on the level of humanitarian response in the Central African Republic.

In 2019 twelve countries will have multi-year HRPs. These are Afghanistan, Cameroon, CAR, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Niger, Nigeria, oPt, Somalia, Sudan and Ukraine.

Libya: Special Report No 32/2018: European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa: Flexible but lacking focus

Source: European Court of Auditors
Country: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

I. Since January 2013, the Financial Regulation governing the EU budget has allowed the European Commission to create and administer European Union trust funds for external actions. These are multi-donor trust funds for emergency, post-emergency or thematic actions.

II. The European Union Emergency trust fund for stability and addressing root causes of irregular migration and displaced persons in Africa (the ‘EUTF for Africa’) is aimed at fostering stability and helping to better manage migration by addressing the root causes of destabilisation, forced displacement and irregular migration. It was agreed at the Valletta Summit on Migration in November 2015. It supports activities in 26 countries across three regions of Africa (referred to as ‘windows’): the Sahel and Lake Chad, the Horn of Africa and North of Africa.

III. We examined whether the EUTF for Africa is well-designed and well-implemented. We conclude that the EUTF for Africa is a flexible tool, but considering the unprecedented challenges that it faces, its design should have been more focused. Compared to traditional instruments, the EUTF for Africa was faster in launching projects. It has, overall, managed to speed up the signing of contracts and making advance payments. However, projects face similar challenges as traditional instruments that delay their implementation.

IV. We found that the objectives of the EUTF for Africa are broad. This has allowed flexibility in terms of adapting the support to suit different and changing situations, but is less useful when it comes to steering action across the three windows and for measuring impact. The Commission has not comprehensively analysed and quantified the needs to be addressed by the trust fund, nor the means at its disposal. We also found that the strategic guidance provided to the managers of the three windows has not been specific enough, and the pooling of resources and capacities of donors is not yet sufficiently effective.

V. Concerning the implementation, we found that the procedures for selecting projects varied between the windows and that the criteria for assessing project proposals were not sufficiently clear or documented. Furthermore, the comparative advantage of funding projects through the EUTF for Africa was not always well explained.

VI. While the EUTF for Africa has adopted a common monitoring system, it is not yet operational and the three windows use different systems for monitoring performance. We found that project objectives were often not SMART and indicators used for measuring project performance lacked baselines. The audited projects were at an early phase of implementation but had started to produce outputs.

VII. The EUTF for Africa has contributed to the effort of decreasing the number of irregular migrants passing from Africa to Europe, but this contribution cannot be measured precisely.

VIII. Based on our audit, we make a number of recommendations, which should be implemented as soon as possible, given that the EUTF for Africa is expected to end in 2020. The Commission should:
- improve the quality of the objectives of the EUTF for Africa,
- revise the selection procedure for projects,
- take measures to speed up implementation,
- improve the monitoring of the EUTF for Africa.

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.