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Posts published in “Senegal”

World: World Bank Group Support in Situations Involving Conflict-Induced Displacement – An Independent Evaluation

Source: World Bank
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the Republic of North Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zambia

Highlights

  • In 2016, the World Bank Group stepped up its engagement in situations of conflictinduced forced displacement at the global and country levels and adopted a new approach to its engagement that recognizes displacement as a development challenge that must be addressed to attain the World Bank Group’s twin goals.

  • Since fiscal year 2016, the Bank Group’s analytical, financial, and operational support has become more aligned with its stated development approach building on lessons from past engagements. This is an important shift.

  • Advisory services and analytics have shifted from providing a rationale for Bank Group engagement in situations involving conflictinduced forced displacement to contextspecific needs assessments focused on evidence-based, medium-term solutions.
    The World Bank successfully mobilized new financing to support situations involving conflict-induced forced displacement and crowded-in funding from other donors. World Bank support for populations forcibly displaced by conflict and their host communities has increased, become more balanced, and focused on priority sectors to
    generate economic opportunities. These are significant achievements.

  • At the same time, the Bank Group has not yet fully leveraged its comparative
    advantages in implementing its development approach. Evidence generated
    from analytical and advisory services needs to be translated better into
    context-specific policy dialogue, project design, and programming.
    Project design, in particular, could further address the specific needs and
    vulnerabilities of conflict-induced forcibly displaced persons and their host
    communities, especially the specific needs and vulnerabilities of the women
    and children among them. Projects should also more systematically include
    specific indicators to monitor and evaluate the effects on affected populations.

  • The World Bank engages and coordinates with humanitarian actors and
    development organizations at various levels, but coordination could be further
    strengthened. Additionally, select partnerships at the country level could be
    leveraged to ensure sector coherence and to foster policy dialogue to enact
    institutional reforms toward self-reliance that address the vulnerabilities of
    forcibly displaced persons. The Bank Group could also increase engagement
    to catalyze the private sector’s role in situations of conflict-induced forced
    displacement.

  • Internal and external factors inhibit the Bank Group’s development
    response to address situations of conflict-induced forced displacement.
    Internal factors include varying levels of active leadership in Country
    Management Units, growing but still limited Bank Group experience, and
    incentives. External factors include the varying nature of displacement
    situations, government capacity, macroeconomic and development
    challenges, and complex political economy factors.

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 31-May-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian t...

World: Global Price Watch: April 2019 Prices (May 31, 2019)

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique...

World: Saving livelihoods saves lives 2018

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Madagascar, Mali, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Viet Nam, World, Yemen

Foreword

In recent years, the number of people experiencing hunger – both chronic and acute – has been alarmingly and persistently high. The annual State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World has repeatedly flagged global attention to the steady rise in the number of people experiencing hunger and malnutrition (815 million people in 2016 and 821 million in 2017), focusing on the role that conflict and climate change play in deepening hunger and vulnerability. At the same time, the annual Global Report on Food Crises has drawn attention to the growing number of people facing acute hunger.

Last year, 2018, was no exception. Some 113 million people in 53 countries suffered from acute hungry, according to the Global Report. That is 113 million girls, boys, men and women, old and young, who were unable to access enough food and required humanitarian assistance.
Much of this hunger is driven by stresses – conflict, climate and economic shocks – that have disrupted livelihoods and left people unable to meet their needs. However, for the most part, the stress is the result of a constant erosion of livelihoods and food systems – as a result of climate change, conflict and political instability, environmental degradation and repeated shocks.
For the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), building resilient agriculture-based livelihoods and food systems is at the core of its efforts to fight acute hunger and avert food crises.

We know how critical humanitarian assistance is – for example in Yemen, where the scale of hunger and human suffering is staggering but which would be considerably worse without the provision of humanitarian assistance.

At the same time, it is clear that humanitarian assistance on its own is not enough to win the battle against acute hunger. That is why FAO’s humanitarian work is firmly embedded in a foundation of building resilience.

This was demonstrated in 2018, when our work extended from immediate humanitarian response to protect lives and livelihoods in some of the most complex contexts in the world, including South Sudan and Yemen, to addressing the vulnerability of pastoral populations and facilitating the development of livestock feed balances in the Horn of Africa, to supporting disaster risk reduction efforts from the Philippines to central America.

This is the true strength of FAO’s resilience programme – using timely information and analysis, a strong evidence base and building on experiences in different contexts to safeguard and build resilient agriculture-based livelihoods and food systems even in times of crisis.
Last year, FAO’s resilience programme reached 25 million people through a combination of short- and medium-term actions intended to ensure their continued access to food, reduce acute hunger and build resilience.

However, as always, this number represents just a portion of those in need. In 2018, 44 percent of the funds requested under various appeals was received, meaning that millions of farmers, herders, fishers and foresters remained without critical livelihoods assistance. In 2019, we will continue working with our partners to ensure we make the best use of limited resources and reduce the number of people that need our assistance by focusing much more on addressing the root causes of their vulnerability.

This publication offers us an opportunity to reflect on some of our achievements over the past year and identify how we can do better in the future. It is not an exhaustive list of all of FAO’s resilience work, but rather an overview of what we can achieve and how much more there is to be done.
No one agency can tackle food crises on its own. That is why FAO is actively engaging with a wide range of partners at country, regional and global levels. In 2018, this included strengthening our partnership with the other two Rome-based Agencies (the IInternational Fund for Agricultural Development [IFAD] and the World Food Programme [WFP]), as well as with other United Nations agencies, such as the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), among others. We have also invested in our relationship with regional organizations like the Central American Integration System (SICA), the Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel (CILSS), the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD), and the Southern African Development Committee (SADC ), particularly in the context of food security information and analysis and resilience measurement.

In 2018, with considerable support from the European Union, we moved ahead in operationalizing the Global Network Against Food Crises, which focuses on preventing and addressing crises, bringing together actors across the humanitarian-development-peace nexus, recognizing that it is only by tackling the root causes of hunger that we can avert food crises in the future.
In addition, greater investment in multi-year resilience programmes is critical. In 2018, we saw significant progress in developing and implementing such programmes, but they must become the norm and not the exception. Unless we invest at scale in building resilience – beyond a handful of projects that target 20 000 people here, 100 000 people there – we will not make significant gains in reducing acute hunger. That is the reality.

José Graziano da Silva
FAO Director-General

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 30-April-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, ...

World: La France et le PAM luttent ensemble pour faire reculer la faim à travers le monde

Source: World Food Programme
Country: Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, France, Jordan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Senegal, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

PARIS – Grâce à la politique française d’aide au développement, et avec une contribution de près de 11 800 000 euros, le Programme Alimentaire Mondial poursuit son combat contre la faim et la malnutrition.

En 2018, 113 millions de personnes ont souffert d’insécurité alimentaire sévère. Une nouvelle fois, la France se mobilise. Cette contribution à destination de 18 pays va permettre au PAM de poursuivre son travail en apportant une aide alimentaire et nutritionnelle, des repas scolaires, ainsi qu’en renforçant la résilience et l’autonomie en reconstruisant les moyens de subsistance des femmes et des hommes. Beaucoup de ces pays sont touchés par de graves conflits, première cause de la faim dans le monde.

C’est notamment le cas en République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) - l'un des pays les plus touchés par les conflits en Afrique – où 85 millions d'habitants sont confrontés à l'une des pires crises alimentaire et nutritionnelle au monde. Le PAM salue également la contribution anticipée de la France au Yémen, où les taux de malnutrition chez les femmes et les enfants sont parmi les plus élevés du monde : 3,2 millions de femmes et d'enfants nécessitent un traitement pour malnutrition aiguë.

Bon nombre des personnes que nous aidons fuient le conflit et ont été forcées d'abandonner leurs terres, leurs maisons et leurs emplois. La contribution française permettra ainsi au PAM de venir en aide aux réfugiés syriens au Liban et en Jordanie principalement, permettant notamment aux enfants d’obtenir un repas chaud grâce aux cantines scolaires. L’impact des investissements dans le cadre scolaire est indéniable, un tel dispositif est indispensable au développement des jeunes générations qui représentent le futur de ces pays. La contribution française permet au PAM de faire de l’éducation un levier pour la croissance et le développement des zones les plus fortement touchées, en ligne avec les politiques nationales. Les filles sont au cœur de cette politique, car elles sont souvent les premières à être retirée de l’école et à souffrir de l’insécurité alimentaire.

La France marque de nouveau son attachement à la collaboration inter-agences et finance plusieurs projets menés conjointement par le PAM et d’autres agences des Nations-Unies (FAO, UNICEF), notamment au Mali, qui porte principalement sur des activités de nutrition. En dépit des progrès considérables réalisés au cours des dernières décennies, la malnutrition demeure un problème immense et universel, qui touche tous les pays du monde et responsable de plus de problèmes de santé que toute autre cause.

Au total, l’engagement de la France permettra au PAM d’intervenir dans 18 pays : au Bangladesh, au Burkina Faso, au Burundi, en Corée du Nord, à Djibouti, en Éthiopie, en Jordanie, au Laos, au Liban, à Madagascar, au Mali, en Mauritanie, au Nigeria, en République démocratique du Congo, au Sénégal, au Soudan, au Tchad et dans les territoires palestiniens. A cette contribution s’ajoute l’aide anticipée pour répondre à l’urgence au Yémen ainsi qu’aux besoins du service aérien d’aide humanitaire des Nations unies (UNHAS) en République centrafricaine et en Mauritanie. UNHAS est parfois le seul moyen d’atteindre des zones reculées. C’est un outil indispensable pour toute la communauté humanitaire et nous remercions la France d’avoir contribué à maintenir ce service menacé par le manque de financement.

Grâce à cette contribution, le PAM peut continuer à œuvrer dans les zones de crises mais également à lutter contre les inégalités, priorité du G7 et commune au PAM et à la France.

# # #

Le Programme alimentaire mondial des Nations Unies - sauve des vies dans les situations d'urgence et change des vies pour des millions de personnes grâce au développement durable. Le PAM travaille dans plus de 80 pays à travers le monde, nourrissant les populations prises dans des conflits et des catastrophes, et instaurant les bases d'un avenir meilleur.

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 31-March-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, ...

World: Global Report on Food Crises 2019

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network, European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations, Intergovernmental Authority on Development, International Food Policy Research Institute, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, UN Children's Fund, Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Food Security Information Network, Food Security Cluster, SICA
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

WHY THIS REPORT?

For several years the number of people who cannot meet their daily food needs without humanitarian assistance has been rising, primarily driven by two factors: persistent instability in conflict-ridden regions and adverse climate events.

These growing needs have been reflected in the increasing level of international humanitarian assistance, which reached US$27.3 billion in 2017, up from US$18.4 billion in 2013. While critical to saving lives and alleviating human suffering, humanitarian assistance does not address the root causes of food crises.

In response, those coordinating emergency humanitarian assistance are working more seriously with those in development support and conflict prevention to find ways to reverse the current trend in escalating numbers of food-insecure people in need of urgent action.

This “new way of working,” aims to address the humanitarian-development (HD) nexus, which emerged from the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016, as well as the Agenda for Humanity’s call to “move from delivering aid to ending need,” which provided a framework for thinking about innovative approaches to address food crises more sustainably in line with Sustainable Development Goal 2.1.

These collaborative efforts to prevent and address food crises are reflected in the UN Security Council’s adoption of resolution 2417 in May 2018. It allows the Council to consider its full range of tools — including sanctions — to ensure that parties to conflict do not violate international humanitarian law (IHL) by, for example, starving civilians as a weapon of war, unlawfully denying humanitarian access to civilian populations in need and depriving people of their means to produce food.

This HD nexus is also reflected in the Global Network Against Food Crises (GNAFC), which seeks to combat food crises from humanitarian and development perspectives and tackle the root causes of these crises (see box). This Global Report on Food Crises (GRFC) contributes to humanitarian development efforts by providing the global and national food security community and GNAFC members with timely, independent and consensus-based information on the severity, magnitude and drivers of food insecurity and malnutrition in food crisis contexts. This information supports humanitarian and development actors to plan and fund evidence-based responses, while using the data to seek high-level political action for durable solutions to food crises.

World: Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Flow Monitoring Survey Results (January to December 2018) Profile of Female Migrants – 2018

Source: International Organization for Migration
Country: Albania, Algeria, Benin, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Italy, Kenya, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Montenegro, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Romania, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Spain, the Republic of North Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, World

OVERVIEW

The flow monitoring surveys are part of the IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) data collection activities in West and Central Africa, East and Horn of Africa, Libya and Europe (Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Kosovo, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania and Spain), that are conducted within the framework of IOM’s research on populations on the move through Africa, the Mediterranean and Western Balkan. Data was collected between January and December 2018 in the above mentioned countries.

Migrants on the move are interviewed by IOM field teams; the surveys collect information on migrants’ profiles, including age, sex, areas of origin, levels of education and employment status before migration, key transit points on their route, cost of the journey, reasons for moving and
intentions.

The present brief highlights of some of the main characteristics of women migrants of 39 nationalities from West and Central Africa, North Africa, East and Horn of Africa, Middle East and the Gulf Cooperation Council. Further information about the questionnaire, sampling and survey implementation can be found on DTM Methodological Framework.

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 28-February-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, ...

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 1, March 2019

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

COUNTRIES REQUIRING EXTERNAL ASSISTANCE FOR FOOD

FAO assesses that globally 41 countries, of which 31 are in Africa, continue to be in need of external assistance for food.
Conflict remains the main driver of high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather‑induced production declines and economic instability have also adversely impacted on food availability and access.

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA

Mostly reflecting beneficial weather conditions, production upturns were estimated in East, West and North Africa in 2018, while rainfall deficits cut outputs in Southern Africa. Continued poor rains have also affected the development of the 2019 crops in parts of Southern Africa, while conflicts in several other countries continue to curtail production prospects this year.

ASIA

Cereal production in 2018 in Far East Asia is estimated at a record high.
By contrast, outputs fell in the Near East and CIS Asia on account of rainfall deficits and the impact of conflicts in parts of the Near East. Production prospects for the soon‑to‑be harvested 2019 wheat crop are generally favourable across the region.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Cereal production is expected to increase in South America in 2019, recovering from last year’s reduced output. In Central America and the Caribbean, despite localized dry weather conditions, cereal outputs in 2018 were close to the average. The 2019 wheat crop in Mexico is likely to remain below average.

Libya: Libya: Activities at Disembarkation, Monthly Update – February 2019

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ghana, Guinea, Libya, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

Libya continues to be a transit point for departure from North Africa towards Europe. UNHCR's interventions at disembarkation points in Libya focus on the provision of life-saving assistance and protection monitoring, to identify persons in need of international protection, as well as vulnerable individuals, such as unaccompanied and separated children, elderly, medical cases, women at risk or victims of trafficking. UNHCR through its partner International Medical Corps provides medical services and core relief items. In addition, UNHCR rehabilitated WASH facilities at six disembarkation points, in Azzawya, Tripoli (3), Tajoura (Al Hamidiyah) and Alkhums.

As of 28 February 2019, the Libyan Coast Guard rescued/intercepted a total of 778 people in different locations along the Libyan coast. Last year the LCG rescued/intercepted a total of 15,235 refugees and migrants at sea. So far in 2019, Libyan local authorities have recovered 8 bodies of people who perished while attempting to cross the Mediterranean towards Europe, while 138 people were reported missing.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

World: Global Price Watch: January 2019 Prices (February 28, 2019)

Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Afghanistan, Chad, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Mali, Mexico, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uganda, World, Yem...

World: Mapping SUN Movement Networks in 17 fragile and conflict-affected states: A snap shot of developments and progress

Source: Emergency Nutrition Network
Country: Bangladesh, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, World, Yemen

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