Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Shelter and Non-Food Items”

Ethiopia: Ethiopia Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 72 | 7 – 20 January 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

HIGHLIGHTS

• Scaled-up response urgently required to more than 250,000 IDPs in Western Ethiopia

• Durable Solutions as nexus opportunity in Somali region: Lessons from SDC

• New law grants nearly a million refugees to exercise more rights in Ethiopia

• Nearly 36 million children in Ethiopia are poor and lack access to basic social services: report

• Humanitarian funding update

Humanitarian Coordianator calls for a scale-up response to displacement crisis in Western Ethiopia

The United Nations Humanitarian/Resident Coordinator (HC/RC a.i.) for Ethiopia Mr. Aeneas Chuma has called for a scaled-up response to an estimated 250,000 people displaced from Benishangul Gumuz into east/west Wollega zones of Oromia region and within Benishangul Gumuz region. The HC/RC reminded the Ethiopia Humanitarian Country Team (EHCT) members that very limited presence of operational partners coupled with constrained security in western Ethiopia has negatively impacted the response to immediate life-saving and protection needs of IDPs. On 14 January 2019, a mission led by the HC/RC visited Gomma Factory site in Nekemte town and two IDPs sites in Belo area of Sasiga woreda and observed that IDPs face shortage of food, shelter, and medicine. The visit also witnessed as many as 600 persons are confined in a hall in the IDP sites-posing serious protection concerns. Lack of access to education for IDPs children is also one area that needs to be addressed immediately. Humanitarian partners have been constrained from accessing five woredas in Kamashi zone, Oda Woreda of Assosa zone, and Mau Kumo Special Woreda in Benishangul Gumuz region due to the ongoing tense security situation in the areas.

The humanitarian community will continue to work with the Government of Ethiopia through the National Disaster Risk Management Commission (NDRMC) and the Oromia Disater Risk Management Commission to expand the emergency operation in east and west Wollega to boost the coordination structure.

Durable Solutions as nexus opportunity in the Somali region: Lessons from SDC

The dramatic growth in the volume, cost, and length of humanitarian assistance for over a decade in Ethiopia, in large part due to the protracted nature of crises, has given prominence to the long-standing discussion around better connectivity between humanitarian and development efforts. The largest number of stakeholders at the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) identified the need to strengthen the humanitarian-development nexus against the backdrop of the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

As Ethiopia is moving towards a multi-year strategy in which humanitarian and development actors envision a collective outcome in a given period of time, countries like Switzerland are already implementing a durable solution to IDPs in Somali region. The Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC) in Ethiopia has been working in the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia since 2015. For SDC nexus has become one of the priority themes in the region motivated by the context where incidences of disasters have increased alongside the ever-weakened coping mechanisms of communities and weak government capacities requiring coherent approaches particularly in the Somali region.

Resilience building is an opportunity to secure sustainability linked to Agenda 2030 and achieve the objective to “Leave No-one Behind”. The SDC’s migration and protection programme engagement in building resilience in the Somali region includes supporting the government to find durable solutions for the displaced population and host communities. The support focuses on improving the wellbeing of IDPs through enhanced information management, capacity building, policy development and advocacy towards durable solutions. By supporting the regional government, SDC is strengthening the Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG), established in 2014. Under the leadership of the regional Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Bureau (DPPB), and International Organization for Migration (IOM), SDC reactivated the group in 2016. The engagement with the Group has resulted in the development and endorsement of a Somali Region Durable Solutions Strategy. The group conducted multi-agency assessments in IDP relocation sites to inform partners on programming, and IDP intention survey in 10 conflict-induced IDP sites with Durable Solutions principles integrated.

The SDC support provided capacity building training for Somali regional sector bureaus on existing international, regional and national conventions, legal provisions, policies and strategies on the rights of IDPs including their rights for achieving durable solutions. The SDC will continue its work in the region to implement IDPs voluntary return, local integration and resettlement activities based on the interests of IDPs and host communities. It will deploy technical experts on Durable Solutions both at the regional and federal levels and will conduct IDP intention survey data collection activities in 45 IDP sites between January and April 2019.

Other areas where the SDC is looking at the nexus approach are through its health and food security programmes. The health programme focuses on improving access to the most vulnerable population i.e. pastoralist communities, to affordable high-quality health care in the Somali region. Focus is given to ‘One Health’ to improve the well-being of pastoralists through improving the governance and service delivery of the three sectors/pillars that pastoralism stands on i.e. livestock, people and natural resources management. To this end, a new thirteen and half year’s project will be launched in March 2019, which encompasses a crisis modifier as a rapid response to protect the developmental gains through early action for communities. The SDC’s food security resilience-building program aims at ensuring resilient and sustainable livelihoods and food security of the drought-prone pastoralists and agro-pastoralists in collaboration with the German Development Cooperation (GIZ) and the Ministry of Agriculture in collaboration, the Bureau of Livestock and Pastoralist Development (BoLPD) and Bureau of Agriculture & Natural Resources Development (BoLNRD).

New law grants more rights to refugees in Ethiopia

The House of Peoples' Representatives of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia on Tuesday (15 January 2019) passed a law that allows refugees in Ethiopia to exercise more rights. The law allows refugees to move out of the camps, attend regular schools and to travel and work across the country. They can also formally register births, marriages and deaths, and will have access to financial services such as bank account. Ethiopia’s revision of its refugee law comes just weeks after the UN General Assembly agreed to the Global Compact on Refugees on 17 December 2018. The New legislation is part of the “Jobs Compact— a US$500 million program which aims to create 100,000 jobs — 30 percent of which will be allocated to refugees.

Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA) said the new law would enhance the lives of refugees and host communities. The UN Refugee Agency welcomes Ethiopia’s historic new refugee law in a press statement released on 18 January 2019. “The passage of this historic law represents a significant milestone in Ethiopia’s long history of welcoming and hosting refugees from across the region for decades,” said Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees. “By allowing refugees the opportunity to be better integrated into society, Ethiopia is not only upholding its international refugee law obligations, but is serving as a model for other refugee-hosting nations around the world.”

Ethiopia currently hosts over 900,000 refugees, primarily from neighbouring South Sudan, Somalia, Sudan and, Eritrea, as well as smaller numbers of refugees from Yemen and Syria, making it Africa's second largest refugee population next Uganda. For more on this: https://reliefweb.int/node/2955609/

Nearly 36 million children in Ethiopia are poor and lack access to basic social services: new report

A joint press release by the Central Statistical Agency and UNICEF Ethiopia indicates that an estimated 36 million of a total population of 41 million children under the age of 18 in Ethiopia are multi-dimensionally poor, meaning they are deprived of basic goods and services in at least three dimensions. Titled “Multi-dimensional Child Deprivation in Ethiopia - First National Estimates,” the report studied child poverty in nine dimensions – development/stunting, nutrition, health, water, sanitation, and housing. Other dimensions included education, health related knowledge, and information and participation.

The study finds that 88 per cent of children in Ethiopia under the age of 18 (36 million) lack access to basic services in at least three basic dimensions of the nine studied, with lack of access to housing and sanitation being the most acute. The study reveals that there are large geographical inequalities: 94 per cent children in rural areas are multi-dimensionally deprived compared to 42 per cent of children in urban areas. Across Ethiopia’s regions, rates of child poverty range from 18 per cent in Addis Ababa to 91 per cent in Afar, Amhara, and SNNPR. Poverty rates are equally high in Oromia and Somali (90 per cent each) and Benishangul-Gumuz (89 per cent). For more on this: https://reliefweb.int/node/2953869/

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 fin Décembre 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

Central African Republic: République Centrafricaine (RCA): Matrice de Suivi du Déplacement (DTM), Rapport 6 | Décembre 2018

Source: International Organization for Migration
Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, South Sudan, Sudan

CONTEXTE

La République Centrafricaine (RCA) est, depuis 20136, en proie à un conflit...

Ethiopia: UNHCR Ethiopia Fact Sheet December 2018

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

Ethiopia is host to the second largest refugee population in Africa, sheltering 905,831 registered refugees and asylum seekers as of 31 August 2018.

Approximately 231,000 of all the refugees in Ethiopia, have gone through the comprehensive (L3) registration, helping to develop a system to better manage and assist refugees.

As a Cluster lead for Protection, CCCM and Shelter, UNHCR continues to be actively participating in the humanitarian response to the IDPs situation in Gedeo and West Guji, supporting the authorities with site management and the coordination of responses to protection needs. UNHCR is also providing emergency kits to the displaced people.

**Working with Partners ■ UNHCR's main government counterpart to ensure the protection of refugees in Ethiopia is the Agency for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA). In addition, UNHCR works in close coordination with some 50 humanitarian partners and is part of the Humanitarian Country Team in Ethiopia, where refugee programmes are discussed strategically to ensure the needs of refugees are adequately presented and addressed across the UN System. UNHCR is also building on a well-established coordination fora, including the inter-sector Refugee Coordination Group, together with national and regional sector working groups. As part of the CRRF, UNHCR is furthering partnerships with line ministries, regional and local authorities, as well as development partners.

Main Activities

Protection

■ UNHCR Ethiopia has prepared action plans to mainstream the prevention of, mitigation and response to sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in the different sectors including Education, Child Protection, Health and Nutrition,
WASH, Shelter and Energy.

■ In preparation for the roll-out of Community Based Complaints Mechanism (CBCM) for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) in 2019, CBCM action plans have already been developed for the camps in the Afar and Tirgay regions.

■ The SGBV e-learning Level 1 online course has been introduced as a mandatory course to all UNHCR staff in Ethiopia.

Education

■ A total of 806 refugee youth have been placed in different public universities during the 2018/19 academic year, 505 of them sponsored by the government of Ethiopia and 301 by the government of Germany under its DAFI scholarships programme. This is on top of the 2,300 refugee students who were enrolled in institutions of higher learning in Ethiopia in 2017/18 academic year.
Data for the 2018/19 primary and secondary school enrolment rate are still being compiled, but based on 2017/2018 reports, enrolment rates at the primary and secondary levels stood at 72% and 12%, respectively. Gaps in the provision of education include a lack of available classroom space and trained teachers, and scholastic materials, including books, libraries, ICT centres and laboratory facilities and supplies. The average teacher to student ratio is 1:80, with only 56% of teachers having formal qualifications to teach at the primary school level. Over 300 refugee teachers are currently enrolled in teachers’ training colleges and are expected to help address the shortage of qualified teachers upon graduation.

Health

■ So far in 2018, a total of 938,644 persons have received consultations across the health facilities in refugee camps, including 12% from the host communities. No disease outbreak was reported from any of the refugee camps. The health facility utilization rate has remained within the normal limit of 1.1 consultations per refugee per year vis-a-vis the standard range of 1-4. The mortality rate in children under five remains low at 0.1/1000/month. A total of 5,728 patients were referred to higher health facilities outside the refugee camps for further diagnosis and treatment. Out of 16,197 live births, 15,735 (97.2%) were assisted by skilled birth attendants. A total of 44,209 refugees were tested and counselled for HIV.

Food Security and Nutrition

■ The amount of general ration provided to refugees remained less than the minimum requirement of 2,100 Kcal per person per day, ranging from 1,737 Kcal in Gambella, Melkadida, Assosa and Jijiga to 1,920 Kcal in camps in the Afar and Tigray regions.
Annual nutrition surveys were conducted in 23 of the 26 refugee camps and the results showed that the global acute malnutrition (GAM) rate in 21 refugee camps is below the emergency threshold of 15%. Prevalence of anemia for children aged 6-59 months is below the emergency threshold (<40%) in 13 of the 23 camps. Interventions are being made to bring the malnutrition and anemia rates in the remaining camps to the minimum level.

Water and Sanitation

■ 12.5 million litres of water were supplied across the regions in Ethiopia hosting refugees, representing an average per capita distribution of 17 litres of water per person per day (lppd). 12 of the 26 refugee camps have achieved the minimum standard of 20 l/person/day. 19 of the 26 refugee camps have met the minimum standard of ‘maximum of 20 persons per latrine’ while 7 camps are still below the minimum standards.

Shelter and CRIs

■ A post distribution monitoring of the pilot cash based interventions (CBI) in camps around Jijiga indicated that cash is an appropriate assistance modality to refugees’ needs in Ethiopia and the preferred one too. The market response was good with no negative impact on the local economy, no reports of insecurity due to the CBI and no disruption of household and community social dynamics. The vouchers that were used to facilitate the purchase of essential aid items from the local market and the construction of improved shelters did not lead to entry of contra-bands into the market as only registered and licensed traders were contracted. Refugees said the CBI improved their purchasing power with reduced adoption of negative coping mechanisms to meet basic non-food needs. It also improved interactions between the local communities and the refugees, as demand of essential aid items in the local markets improved, leading to a positive impact on the local economy. The findings will inform the designing of programmes to expand CBI to other locations as well as to cover more aid items and services.

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

■ UNHCR and ARRA work in close coordination with partners to ensure efficient and coordinated delivery of protection and assistance to refugees. Camp coordination meetings and technical working groups take place both at the zonal and camp levels.

Access to Energy

■ UNHCR continues to seek solutions to ensure refugees’ access to energy while strengthening environmental protection activities in and around refugee camps. Response to refugees’ cooking energy needs remains a largely unmet priority. In this regard, communal kitchens and other basic facilities in Sherkole, Aysaita, Barahle and Hitsats camps are being connected to the national electricity grid as part of a pilot initiative within the operation. 33 briquette carbonizers are in place in the five camps near Assosa, and two automated briquette producing machines (1 in Assosa and 1 in Aysaiata) are also installed to increase the production of charcoal briquettes.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update December 2018 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

At the end of December 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) required US$24.93 billion to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The requirements remained unchanged as of the end of November 2018. The plans are funded at $14.58 billion which amounts to 58.5 per cent of financial requirements for 2018. Notably, the percentage of total funding contributed through humanitarian response plans carried out by the UN with partners in 2018 is estimated at 62.9%. This is higher than at any time in the last ten years except 2017 (66.2 per cent). The plans were funded at $14.58 billion which amounted to 58.5 per cent of financial requirements for 2018.

Global requirements finished the year $230 million higher than for December 2017, and the amount of funding reported against UN-coordinated appeals at the end of 2018 was $78 million higher than at this time last year.

To make information on vulnerable people’s needs, planned response, funding and funding gaps in humanitarian crises accessible to all in one place, on 4 December, OCHA announced the launch of a new web-based portal, Humanitarian Insight.

Pooled Funds

With $945 million received from 32 Member States, one crown dependency and the general public through the UN Foundation, 2018 became the fifth consecutive year of record-high contributions received for country-based pooled funds (CBPFs). The increased contributions to CBPFs are testament to donors’ trust in this funding mechanism as a tool for principled, transparent and inclusive humanitarian assistance. Globally, a total of $756 million was allocated during the calendar year to 1,334 projects implemented by 657 partners, with two-thirds of overall CBPF allocations disbursed to NGOs. Over 24 percent were directly allocated to local and national NGOs, amounting to some $183 million. Health, emergency shelter and non-food items, water, sanitation and hygiene, food security, nutrition and protection were the largest funded sectors during 2018. In 2018, the Yemen Humanitarian Fund became the largest CBPF ever, allocating $188 million to 53 partners implementing 112 projects. The country-based funds in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, South Sudan and Turkey each allocated over $50 million.

Between 1 January and 31 December 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved the largest amount of funding from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) in a single year with a total of $500 million. This includes $320 million from the Rapid Response Window and $180 million from the Underfunded Emergencies Window, for life-saving activities in 49 countries. In December, a total of $12.8 million was released to assist Congolese returnees and people expelled from Angola, to meet needs outstanding since the October earthquake in Haiti, and to support people affected by flooding in Nigeria.

Specific appeal information

On 17 December, the Palestinian Authority and the Humanitarian Coordinator for the occupied Palestinian territory launched the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) for $350 million to address critical humanitarian needs of 1.4 million Palestinians in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, including East Jerusalem. A full 77 per cent of the requested funds target Gaza where the humanitarian crisis has been aggravated by a massive rise in Palestinian casualties due to demonstrations. Israel’s prolonged blockade, the internal Palestinian political divide and recurrent escalations of hostilities necessitate urgent humanitarian assistance for people assessed as being most in need of protection, food, health care, shelter, water and sanitation in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

A three-month Operational Plan for Rapid Response to Internal Displacement issued on 31 December seeks $25.5 million to reach civilians displaced by inter-communal violence in Ethiopia. The plan focuses exclusively on addressing health, nutrition, education, water, sanitation and hygiene, non-food items, protection and agriculture issues related to recent violence-induced displacements around Kamashi and Assoss (Benishangul Gumuz region) and East and West Wollega (Oromia region). Nearly 250,000 people have been displaced in these regions since September 2018. The plan has been developed to bridge the period between now and the official launch of the 2019 Humanitarian and Disaster Resilience Plan (HDRP). The needs and requirements for the Benishangul Gumuz-East/West Wollega response will be included in the HDRP.

On 13 December, Assistant-Secretary-General/Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator (ASG/DERC) Ursula Mueller delivered a statement to the Security Council on the humanitarian situation in Ukraine, where more than 3,000 civilians have been killed and up to 9,000 injured since conflict began in 2014. The crisis affects over 30 per cent of elderly people in the country, the highest proportion of people in this category in the world. The 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan, which required $187 million, was only 32 per cent funded. Without adequate funds, food, healthcare, water and sanitation, and other life-saving assistance cannot be provided.

During a 14 December briefing the USG/ERC and the Special Envoy for Yemen urged the Security Council to act swiftly to ensure full implementation of the Stockholm Agreement to demilitarize ports in the country. The agreement requires mutual withdrawal of forces from Hodeida city and its ports and a governorate-wide ceasefire to allow desperately needed humanitarian assistance to flow. The USG/ERC encouraged all parties to continue to engage seriously in implementing the multiple agreements reached in Sweden. The Government of Yemen requires billions of dollars in external support for its 2019 budget, and in parallel this year’s humanitarian response plan for Yemen requests $4 billion, about half of it for emergency food assistance.

On 11 December at a meeting in New York on the gravity of the humanitarian situation in the Central African Republic, OCHA reiterated that response to this crisis is a priority for the organization and announced that in 2019 a high-level meeting will be arranged to address the impact of underfunding on the level of humanitarian response in the Central African Republic.

In 2019 twelve countries will have multi-year HRPs. These are Afghanistan, Cameroon, CAR, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Niger, Nigeria, oPt, Somalia, Sudan and Ukraine.

South Sudan: Research Terms of Reference – UNHCR Refugee Response: inter-agency multi-sector needs assessment (MSNA) SSD1802 South Sudan, September 2018, Version 1

Source: REACH Initiative
Country: South Sudan, Sudan

Specific Objective(s)

To understand humanitarian needs of populations in Maban refugee camps in Food Security and Livelihoods, Nutrition, Camp Management, Environment, NFIs & Shelter, WASH an...

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.