Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Ukraine”

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals [EN/AR/FR]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

Mali: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, March 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Yemen

Overview

France will hold the presidency in March. France and Germany, the Council president in April, will hold a “joint presidency” covering both months.

There will be one open debate on combating the financing of terrorism, during which a resolu-tion may be adopted.

The Council is expected to carry out a visiting mission to Mali. A briefing on the visiting mission and a ministerial meeting on Mali with the par-ticipation of Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubèye Maïga are scheduled shortly after the delegation returns.

Regarding other African issues, there will be briefings, followed by consultations, on South Sudan (UNMISS), the DRC (MONUSCO), and the Great Lakes Region. Consultations are also anticipated on Libya (UNSMIL) and the 1970 Libya sanctions regime. The Council is scheduled to adopt resolutions renewing the mandates of UNMISS, MONUSCO, and UNSOM (Somalia).

The Council will be briefed on Yemen on the implementation of resolution 2452, which estab-lished the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement (UNMHA). It will also receive the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weap-ons in Syria.

Other Middle East issues that will be consid-ered include:

• Israel/Palestine, the regular monthly meeting;
• Lebanon, an update on the implementation of resolution 1701, which called for a cessation of hostilities between the Shi’a militant group Hezbollah and Israel in 2006; and
• UNDOF in the Golan Heights, the quarterly report and most recent developments.

Two meetings are anticipated on European issues: Federica Mogherini, the EU High Repre-sentative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, is expected to brief the Council on UN-EU coop-eration in maintaining international peace and security; and Slovakian Foreign Minister Miro-slav Lajčák, the current Chairperson-in-Office for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), will brief on OSCE activities.

Council members anticipate a briefing on Haiti (MINUJUSTH), most likely from Special Representative and head of MINUJUSTH, Helen Meagher La Lime, and will also consider the most recent report on the implementation of resolution 2410—which set a timeline for the gradual draw-down of formed police units—and political and security developments in the context of the 15 April expiry of MINUJUSTH’s mandate.

In a change of practice, the Council will hold its quarterly meeting on Afghanistan (UNAMA)as a briefing, followed by consultations, rather than in debate format, prior to renewing the mis-sion’s mandate later in the month.

The Council is also expected to adopt a resolu-tion renewing the mandate of the Panel of Experts of the 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee.

A briefing of the 1540 Sanctions Committee is also anticipated during the month.

There will be an informal interactive dialogue on the Middle East region. Arria-formula meet-ings are anticipated on women’s participation in peace processes, on Crimea, and on criminal jus-tice and human rights.

Council members will continue to follow closely developments in Venezuela and may meet on this and other issues not on the programme as needed.

World: Humanitarian Coordinator Information Products, February 2018

Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee
Country: Afghanistan, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

World: Humanitarian Coordinator Information Products, February 2019

Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee
Country: Afghanistan, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

World: Commission Implementing Decision of 11.1.2019 on the financing of humanitarian aid actions from the 2019 general budget of the European Union – ECHO/WWD/BUD/2019/01000

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

Having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, amending Regulations (EU) No 1296/2013, (EU) No 1301/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU)
No 1304/2013, (EU) No 1309/2013, (EU) No 1316/2013, (EU) No 223/2014, (EU) No 283/2014, and Decision No 541/2014/EU and repealing Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/20121 , and in particular Article 110 thereof,

Having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 1257/96 of 20 June 1996 concerning humanitarian aid2 ('the Humanitarian Aid Regulation' or 'HAR'), and in particular Article 1,

Article 2, Article 4 and Article 15(2) and (3) thereof,

Having regard to Council Decision 2013/755/EU of 25 November 2013 on the association of the overseas countries and territories with the European Union ('the Overseas Association Decision')3 , and in particular Article 79 thereof,

Whereas:

(1) In order to ensure the implementation of the humanitarian aid actions of the Union for 2019, it is necessary to adopt an annual financing decision for 2019. Article 110 of Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 (‘the Financial Regulation’) establishes detailed rules on financing decisions.

(2) The human and economic losses caused by natural disasters are devastating. These natural disasters, be they sudden or slow onset, that entail major loss of life, physical and psychological or social suffering or material damage, are constantly increasing, and with them so is the number of victims. Man-made humanitarian crises, resulting from wars or outbreaks of fighting (also called complex or protracted crises) account for a large proportion of, and are, the main source of humanitarian needs in the world.
There is also a need for international support for preparedness activities. Disaster preparedness aims at reducing the impact of disasters and crises on populations, allowing early warning and early action to better assist those affected.

(3) The humanitarian aid funded under this Decision should also cover essential activities and support services to humanitarian organisations as referred to in Articles 2(c) and 4 HAR, including notably the protection of humanitarian goods and personnel.

(4) The Union became party to the Food Assistance Convention on 28 November 2012; the Convention entered into force on 1 January 2013. In accordance with Article 5 of the Convention, an amount of EUR 350 000 000, to be spent as food and nutrition assistance funded under this Decision, is to be counted towards the minimum annual commitment for the year 2019 of the Union under the Food Assistance Convention.

(5) Although as a general rule grants funded by this Decision should be co-financed, by way of derogation, the Authorising Officer in accordance with Article 190(3) of the Financial Regulation, may agree to their full financing.

(6) The envisaged assistance is to comply with the conditions and procedures set out by the restrictive measures adopted pursuant to Article 215 TFEU. The needs-based and impartial nature of humanitarian aid implies that the Union may be called to finance humanitarian assistance in crises and countries covered by Union restrictive measures.
In such situations, and in keeping with the relevant principles of international law and with the principles of impartiality, neutrality and non-discrimination referred to in Article 214(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the Union should allow and facilitate rapid and unimpeded access to humanitarian relief by civilians in need. The relevant Union restrictive measures should therefore be interpreted and implemented in such a manner as not to preclude the delivery of humanitarian assistance to the intended beneficiaries.

(7) The Commission may acknowledge and accept contributions from other donors in accordance with Article 21(2)(b) of the Financial Regulation, subject to the signing of the relevant agreement. Where such contributions are not denominated in euro, a reasonable estimate of conversion should be made.

(8) It is advisable to maintain a part of the Union budget for humanitarian aid unallocated in order to cover unforeseen operations, as part of an operational reserve.

(9) In cases where Union funding is granted to non-governmental organisations in accordance with Article 7 HAR, in order to guarantee that the beneficiaries of that funding are able to meet their commitments in the long term, the Authorising Officer responsible should verify if the non-governmental organisations concerned satisfy the requisite eligibility and selection criteria, notably as regards their legal, operational and financial capacity. The verification to be made should also seek to confirm whether the non-governmental organisations concerned are able to provide humanitarian aid in accordance with the humanitarian principles set out in the European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid4 .

(10) In cases where the Union finances humanitarian aid operations of Member States' specialised agencies in accordance with Article 9 HAR, in order to guarantee that the beneficiaries of Union grants are capable of fulfilling their commitments in the long run, the Authorising Officer responsible should verify the legal, operational and, where the entities or bodies concerned are governed by private law, financial capacity of any Member States' specialised agencies desiring to receive financial support under this Decision. The verification to be made should notably seek to confirm whether the Member States' specialised agencies concerned are able to provide humanitarian assistance or equivalent international relief outside the Union in accordance with the humanitarian principles set out in the European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid.

(11) Pursuant to Article 195(a) Financial Regulation, it is appropriate to authorise the award of grants without a call for proposals to the non-governmental organisations satisfying the eligibility and suitability criteria referred to in Article 7 HAR for the purpose of humanitarian aid.

(12) In order to ensure an effective delivery in the field of Union-funded humanitarian aid in all relevant crisis contexts while taking into account the specific mandates of international organisations, such as the United Nations and the international component of the Red Cross and Red Crescent movement (International Committee of the Red Cross and International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies), it is necessary to use indirect management for the implementation of Union-funded humanitarian aid operations.

(13) The Commission is to ensure a level of protection of the financial interests of the Union with regards to entities and persons entrusted with the implementation of Union funds by indirect management as provided for in Article 154(3) of the Financial Regulation. To this end, such entities and persons are to be subject to an assessment of their systems and procedures in accordance with Article 154(4) of the Financial Regulationand, if necessary, to appropriate supervisory measures in accordance with Article 154(5) of the Financial Regulation before a contribution agreement can be signed.

(14) It is necessary to allow for the payment of interest due for late payment on the basis of Article 116(5) Financial Regulation.

(15) It is appropriate to reserve appropriations for a trust fund in accordance with Article 234 Financial Regulation in order to strengthen the international role of the Union in external actions and development and to increase its visibility and efficiency.

(16) In order to allow for flexibility in the implementation of the financing decision, it is appropriate to define the term 'substantial change' within the meaning of Article 110(5) of the Financial Regulation.

(17) The measures provided for in this Decision are in accordance with the opinion of the Humanitarian Aid Committee established by Article 17(1) HAR.

World: Thematic series: The ripple effect: economic impacts of internal displacement – February 2019

Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre
Country: Central African Republic, Haiti, Libya, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Ukraine, World, Yemen

First estimates of the financial impact of internal displacement have been released by the Intern...

World: Humanitarian Funding Update January 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

2018 Humanitarian Funding Update: looking back at 2018

Since reports on 2018 funding continue to be received well into the first quarter of 2019, this month’s update includes data for last year. At the end of December 2018, US$24.93 billion were required to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need through 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP). At that point, the plans were funded at $14.58 billion, 58.5% of funding requirements. Additional contributions reported in January 2019 bring the total funding figure for UN-led plans to $15.07 billion, 60.5% of funding requirements.

Global requirements for 2018 were $230 million higher than for December 2017. The amount of funding reported against UN-coordinated appeals for 2018 as at 31 January 2019 is $78 million higher than the amount reported for 2017 as at end January 2018.

The perspective for 2019

The GHO 2019 published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans, the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). As at the end of January, with the inclusion of the Madagascar Flash Appeal (November 2018 – April 2019), requirements have reached $21.93 billion. These figures do not include those for the Syria HRP, which will be published at a later date.

The GHO 2019 outlined plans to assist an estimated 93.6 million of 131.7 million people assessed to be in need in 2019, as opposed to 97.9 million of 133.3 million people in need at the end of 2018. The Madagascar Flash Appeal (November 2018 – April 2019), the Mozambique Plan (November 2018 - June 2019) and the Venezuela RMRP – all newly tracked – together add 3.36 million people to those to receive humanitarian aid this year.

In 2019, the number of people in need and to receive assistance is higher than last year in five countries (Cameroon, Ethiopia, Myanmar, the Philippines and Yemen) and lower in nine countries (Bangladesh, Burundi, Chad, DRC, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Somalia).

As of the end of January 2019, an estimated 95.1 million of 134.1 million people in need are expected to require assistance in 2019.

Plans were finalized in January 2019 for the Central African Republic (CAR), Nigeria, Somalia and Ukraine.

On 7 January, the Government of the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Humanitarian Country Team officially launched the Central African Republic HRP 2019, requesting $430.7 million to assist 1.7 million extremely vulnerable Central Africans. The Humanitarian Coordinator called upon donors to help mobilize funding for CAR to consolidate achievements of previous years and to support humanitarian response in 2019; 900,000 people were provided with humanitarian assistance through the CAR HRP in 2018.

World: To Walk the Earth in Safety (2018): Documenting the United States’ Commitment to Conventional Weapons Destruction

Source: US Department of State
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Georgia, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Micronesia (Federated States of), Montenegro, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Palau, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

"This 17th Edition of To Walk the Earth In Safety summarizes the United States' CWD programs in 2017. CWD assistance provides the United States with a powerful and flexible tool to help partner countries manage their stockpiles of munitions, destroy excess small arms and light weapons (SA/LW) and clear explosive hazards such as landmines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and UXO. Our assistance also helps countries destroy or enhance security of their man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS) and their threat to civilian aviation, in addition to other weapons and munitions. ... Thanks to the U.S. Congress’ bipartisan support and support of the American people, we can attest that our goal remains one where all may walk the earth in safety." -- Message From Under Secretary Andrea Thompson

World: CrisisWatch January 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indon...

World: Watch List 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Honduras, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Myanmar, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, S...

World: Humanitarian Coordinator Information Products, January 2019

Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee
Country: Afghanistan, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 fin Décembre 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: Aperçu du Financement Humanitaire en 2018 – Appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

À la fin du mois de décembre 2018, 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour la Syrie (3RP) nécessitaient 24,93 milliards de dollars pour assister 97,9 millions de personnes ayant un besoin urgent d’assistance humanitaire. Les financements requis restaient identiques à ceux enregistrés à fin du mois de novembre 2018. Les plans sont financés à hauteur de 14,58 milliards de dollars, comblant 58,5% des besoins financiers pour 2018. Au total, les Plans de réponse humanitaire menés par les Nations unies avec leurs partenaires en 2018 ont été financés à hauteur de 62,9 %.
Ce taux de financement est le plus élevé enregistré au cours des dix dernières années, à l’exception de 2017 (66,2%).

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.
Le financement requis pour répondre aux besoins à travers le monde était 230 millions de dollars plus élevé qu’en décembre 2017 et le montant du financement enregistré à la fin 2018 par rapport aux appels coordonnés par les Nations unies était supérieur de 78 millions de dollars à celui rapporté l’année précédente à la même période.

Pour rendre les informations sur les besoins des groupes vulnérables, les financements, et les déficits de financement dans les crises humanitaires, accessibles à tous, en un même endroit, OCHA a annoncé, le 4 décembre, le lancement d’un nouveau portail Internet, Humanitarian Insight.

Fonds communs

Trente-deux États membres, une dépendance de la Couronne britannique et le grand public, à travers la Fondation des Nations unies, ont contribué un total de 945 millions de dollars ; faisant de 2018 la cinquième année consécutive de contributions records reçues par les Fonds de financement communs pour les pays (CBPF). L’augmentation des contributions aux CBPF témoigne de la confiance des donateurs dans ce mécanisme de financement en tant outil d’assistance humanitaire basée sur les principes, transparente et inclusive. En 2018, un total de 756 millions de dollars ont été affectés à1334 projets mis en œuvre par 657 partenaires à travers le monde, dont deux-tiers d’affectations globales à des CBPF versées à des ONG. Plus de 24% ont été alloués à des ONG locales et nationales, pour un total de quelque 183 millions de dollars. La santé, les abris d’urgence et les articles non-alimentaires, l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la protection ont été les secteurs les plus financés en 2018. Le Fonds humanitaire pour le Yémen est devenu le plus important CBPF de tous les temps, ayant alloué 188 millions de dollars à 53 partenaires d’exécution, et ce pour 112 projets. Les fonds de financement communs pays pour l’Afghanistan, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Éthiopie, le Soudan du Sud et la Turquie ont reçu, chacun, plus de 50 millions de dollars.

Entre le 1er janvier et le 31 décembre 2018, le Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence a approuvé le montant de financement pour une seule année le plus important du Fonds central d'intervention d’urgence (CERF) pour un total de 500 millions de dollars. Pour des activités vitales dans 49 pays , il comprend 320 millions de dollars du Créneau de réponse rapide et180 millions de dollars du Créneau consacré aux situations d’urgence sous-financées. En décembre, un total de12,8 millions de dollars étaient libérés pour assister des rapatriés congolais et des personnes expulsées d’Angola, pour répondre à des besoins en attente depuis le tremblement de terre d’octobre en Haïti et pour apporter un soutien aux personnes affectées par les inondations au Nigeria.

Le 17 décembre, l’Autorité palestinienne et le Coordonnateur humanitaire pour le Territoire palestinien occupé ont lancé le Plan de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2019 d’un montant de 350 millions de dollars pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires cruciaux de 1,4 million de Palestiniens dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie , y compris à Jérusalem-Est. 77% des fonds demandés ciblent Gaza où la crise humanitaire a été aggravée par une augmentation massive de victimes palestiniennes dues aux manifestations. Le blocus prolongé imposé par Israël, la division politique interne palestinienne et les escalades récurrentes des hostilités nécessitent une assistance humanitaire d’urgence pour les personnes estimées avoir le plus besoin de protection, de nourriture, de soins de santé, d’abris, d’eau et d’assainissement dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

Un Plan opérationnel de réponse rapide aux déplacements internes de trois mosi, à hauteur de 25,5 millions de dollars a été émis le 31 décembre, à l’intention de civils déplacés par la violence intercommunautaire en Éthiopie. Le plan porte exclusivement sur la réponse aux besoins en matière de santé, de nutrition, d’éducation, d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène, d’articles non-alimentaires, de protection et de soutiens agricoles, découlant des récents déplacements provoqués par la violence aux alentours de Kamashi et d’Assoss (région de Benishangul Gumuz) et pour l’Est et Ouest Welega (région d’Oromia). Près de 250 000 personnes ont été déplacées dans ces régions depuis septembre 2018. Le plan a été élaboré pour couvrir la période entre aujourd'hui et le lancement officiel du Plan de réponse humanitaire et de résilience aux catastrophes (HDRP) de 2019. Les besoins et les demandes de la réponse de Benishangul Gumuz-Est/Ouest Welega seront inclus dans le HDRP.

Le 13 décembre, Ursula Mueller, Sous-Secrétaire générale aux Affaires humanitaires des Nations unies et Coordonnatrice adjointe des secours d'urgence (ASG/DERC), a fait une déclaration au Conseil de sécurité sur la situation humanitaire en Ukraine où plus de 3000 civils ont été tués et jusqu’à 9000 ont été blessés depuis le début du conflit en 2014. Avec plus de 30%, le pays compte la plus forte proportion au monde de personnes âgées affectées par une crise. Le Plan de réponse humanitaire de 2018, qui nécessitait 187 millions de dollars, n’a été financé qu’à une hauteur de 32%. Sans fonds adéquats, l’aide alimentaire, en soins de santé, en eau et assainissement, et autres assistances vitales ne pourront être assurées.

Au cours d’un briefing le 14 décembre, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux Affaires humanitaires (USG/ERC) et l’Envoyé spécial pour le Yémen ont exhorté le Conseil de sécurité à agir rapidement pour garantir la pleine mise en œuvre de l'Accord de Stockholm pour la démilitarisation du pays.
L’accord prévoit le retrait mutuel de toute force présente dans la ville de Hodeïda et ses ports, ainsi qu’un cessez-le-feu à l’échelle du gouvernorat pour permettre à l’assistance humanitaire désespérément nécessaire d’être acheminée. Le Secrétaire-général adjoint a encouragé toutes les parties à continuer de s’engager sérieusement dans la mise en œuvre des accords multiples convenus en Suède. Le Gouvernement du Yémen a besoin de milliards de dollars d’appui extérieur pour son budget de 2019 et le Plan de réponse humanitaire nécessite un financement parallèle de 4 milliards de dollars, dont environ la moitié pour l’assistance alimentaire d’urgence uniquement.

Le 11 décembre, lors d’une réunion à New York sur la gravité de la situation humanitaire dans la République centrafricaine, OCHA a réitéré que la réponse à cette crise est prioritaire pour l'organisation et a annoncé l’organisation, en 2019, d’une réunion de haut niveau sur l’impact du sous-financement de la réponse humanitaire en République centrafricaine.
En 2019, les réponses humanitaires proposées dans 12 pays s’inscrivent dans le cadre de HRP pluriannuels : en Afghanistan, au Cameroun, en Haïti, au Niger, au Nigeria, en RCA, en RDC, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Tchad, dans le Territoire palestinien occupé et en Ukraine.

World: L’UE renforce son aide humanitaire – budget record adopté pour 2019

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Bruxelles, le 16 janvier 2019

Alors que le nombre de personnes frappées par des crises humanitaires dans le monde ne cesse de grossir, l'UE a adopté pour 2019 un budget initial annuel pour l'aide humanitaire sans précédent, d'un montant de 1,6 milliard d'euros.

Entre conflits régionaux de longue durée au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique et incidence grandissante du changement climatique sur la planète, les crises humanitaires s'aggravent, tandis que les combats compromettent le bon acheminement de l'aide aux plus nécessiteux.

«Ce nouveau budget maintient l'UE en tête des pourvoyeurs d'aide humanitaire face aux crises telles que celles que traversent actuellement la Syrie et le Yémen. S'il est vrai que l'aide humanitaire ne peut à elle seule résoudre tous les problèmes, nous n'en devons pas moins tout mettre en œuvre pour venir en aide aux plus vulnérables. C'est notre devoir humanitaire. Nous devons aussi avoir à l'esprit les conséquences de toutes ces crises sur les enfants, sur la prochaine génération. D'où la part record de 10 % du nouveau budget, soit 10 fois plus qu'en 2015, consacrée à l'éducation dans les situations d'urgence, afin que nous puissions donner aux enfants les outils leur permettant de construire un avenir meilleur,» a déclaré Christos Stylianides, commissaire chargé de l'aide humanitaire et de la gestion des crises.

L'essentiel du budget servira à faire face à la crise en Syrie, à aider les réfugiés dans les pays voisins et à apporter des réponses à la situation extrêmement critique que connaît le Yémen. En Afrique, l'aide de l'UE soutiendra les populations des régions touchées par des crises au Soudan du Sud, en République centrafricaine, dans le bassin du lac Tchad et en République démocratique du Congo, cette dernière étant frappée par une épidémie d'Ebola, ainsi que des régions souffrant de crises alimentaires et nutritionnelles, comme le Sahel.

En Amérique latine, le financement de l'UE aidera les populations les plus vulnérables touchées par la crise au Venezuela et victimes du conflit de longue date en Colombie. L'Union européenne continuera aussi à acheminer de l'aide en Afghanistan et à assister la population rohingya, tant au Myanmar/en Birmanie qu'au Bangladesh. En Europe, les efforts humanitaires consentis par l'UE seront principalement axés sur les personnes victimes du conflit en Ukraine.

En raison des effets de plus en plus marqués du changement climatique, cette enveloppe aidera les communautés vulnérables dans les pays exposés aux catastrophes à mieux se préparer aux différents chocs climatiques, tels que les sécheresses, les inondations et les cyclones.

Contexte

L'aide humanitaire de l'UE est à la fois impartiale et indépendante. Elle est accordée uniquement sur la base des besoins et dans le respect des principes d'humanité, de neutralité, d'impartialité et d'indépendance. Grâce à son aide humanitaire, l'UE vient à la rescousse de millions de personnes en détresse dans le monde entier. L'aide de l'UE est mise en œuvre par l'intermédiaire d'organisations humanitaires partenaires, dont les agences des Nations unies, des organisations non gouvernementales et des organismes de la Croix-Rouge, qui ont signé des accords de partenariat avec la Commission européenne. La Commission suit de près l'utilisation qui est faite des fonds de l'UE grâce à son réseau mondial d'experts humanitaires et a mis en place des règles strictes pour s'assurer que les fonds alloués sont dépensés à bon escient.

World: EU increases its humanitarian assistance – record budget adopted for 2019

Source: European Commission
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Brussels, 16 January 2019

As more and more people face humanitarian crises worldwide, the EU has adopted its highest ever initial annual humanitarian budget of €1.6 billion for 2019.

From long-lasting conflicts in the Middle East and Africa, to the growing impact of climate change worldwide, humanitarian crises are worsening and conflict threatens aid delivery to those most in need.

"With this new budget, the EU remains a leading humanitarian donor in the face of crises such as Syria and Yemen. Humanitarian aid alone cannot solve all problems but we must do everything in our power to help the most vulnerable. This is our humanitarian duty. We must also think about the impact of these many crises on children, on the next generation. That's why a record 10% of the new budget, 10 times more than in 2015, is dedicated to education in emergencies, so we can give children the tools to build a better future," said Christos Stylianides, Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management.

The biggest bulk of the budget will address the crisis in Syria, refugees in neighbouring countries and the extremely critical situation in Yemen. In Africa, EU aid will support people in regions affected by crisis in South Sudan, Central African Republic, Lake Chad basin, the Democratic republic of Congo suffering from an Ebola outbreak and in regions suffering food and nutrition crises, such as Sahel.

In Latin America, EU funding will help the most vulnerable populations affected by the crisis in Venezuela and protracted conflict in Colombia. The European Union will also continue to provide assistance in Afghanistan and help Rohingya populations in both Myanmar and Bangladesh. In Europe, the EU's humanitarian efforts will focus on people affected by the conflict in Ukraine.

In view of the growing effects of climate change, the funding will help vulnerable communities in disaster prone countries to prepare better to various climatic shocks, such as droughts, floods and cyclones.

Background

EU humanitarian aid is impartial and independent, and is based only on needs, delivered in accordance with humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence. The EU's humanitarian assistance helps millions of people in need across the world. EU assistance is implemented via humanitarian partner organisations, including UN agencies, non-governmental organisations and the Red Cross family, who have signed partnership agreements with the European Commission. The Commission closely monitors the use of EU funds via its global network of humanitarian experts and has strict rules in place to ensure funding is well spent.

IP/19/426

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.