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Afghanistan: R2P Monitor, Issue 45 (15 May 2019)

Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Yemen

The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) is a global norm, unanimously adopted by heads of state and government at the 2005 UN World Summit, aimed at preventing and halting Genocide, War Crimes, Ethnic Cleansing and Crimes Against Humanity. R2P stipulates that:

"Every State has the Responsibility to Protect its populations from the four mass atrocity crimes (Pillar I). "

"The wider international community has the responsibility to encourage and assist individual States in meeting that responsibility (Pillar II)."

"If a State is manifestly failing to protect its populations, the international community must be prepared to take appropriate collective action, in a timely and decisive manner and in accordance with the UN Charter (Pillar III)."

World: Aperçu du financement humanitaire, Avril 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

L’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale (GHO), publié le 4 décembre 2018 annonçait des besoins en financement de 21,9 milliards de dollars pour 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour les réfugiés et les migrants du Venezuela (RMRP). À la fin du mois de mars, en raison essentiellement de la publication du HRP de la Syrie nécessitant 3,32 milliards de dollars, les besoins avaient atteint 25,11 milliards de dollars. Ce mois-ci, l’augmentation des besoins pour l’Appel éclair révisé du Zimbabwe (suite au Cyclone Idai), passant de 233,8 millions à 293,9 millions de dollars, porte le total des besoins au 30 avril, à 25,17 milliards de dollars.
Les besoins financiers pour les Plans de réponse humanitaire du Burundi et de l’Irak, tous deux récemment publiés, correspondent à ce qui avait été anticipé dans l'aperçu de la situation humanitaire. À la fin du mois d’avril, le nombre de personnes dans le besoin dans 55 pays est estimé à 140,8 millions.². Les besoins humanitaires du Burundi et de l’Irak avaient déjà été anticipés dans l’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale de cette année.
Les plans visent à fournir une assistance à 105,7 millions de personnes.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 Monthly Funding Update – April 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

The Global Humanitarian Overview published on 4 December announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMPP). By the end of March, mainly as a result of publication of the Syria HRP requiring $3.32 billion, the requirements had reached $25.11 billion. This month’s increase in requirements for the revised Zimbabwe Flash Appeal (following Cyclone Idai) from $233.8 million to $293.9 million, brings the total requirement as at 30 April to $25.17 million.

Financial requirements for the Burundi and Iraq Humanitarian Response Plans, which were both published recently, are as anticipated in the annual, global appeal.

As at the end of April, 140.8 million people are estimated to be in need in 54 countries.2 This is the same number as at the end of the previous month. Humanitarian needs in Burundi and Iraq had already been anticipated in the annual, global appeal.

The plans aim to provide assistance for 105.7 million people.

World: The Market Monitor, Issue 43 – April 2019

Source: World Food Programme
Country: Angola, Argentina, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Mozambique, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sudan, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Ye...

World: CrisisInSight: Humanitarian Access Overview (May 2019)

Source: Assessment Capacities Project
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

INTRODUCTION

ACAPS Humanitarian Access Overview provides a snapshot of the most challenging contexts regarding humanitarian access.

ACAPS analysts looked into nine indicators to rank and compare the humanitarian access levels worldwide. Affected populations in more than 50 countries are not getting proper humanitarian assistance due to access constraints.
Humanitarian access has deteriorated in Colombia, Iraq, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Somalia over the past six months. 13 new countries entered the ranking since the latest ACAPS Humanitarian Access report released in August 2018.

Physical constraints and restriction/obstruction of access to services and assistance are the most common challenges

World: Press Conference by Security Council President on Programme of Work for May (1 May 2019)

Source: UN Security Council
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

The Security Council’s programme of work for May will feature two open debates, the first on peacekeeping and the other on protection of civilians in armed conflict, Dian Triansyah Djani (Indonesia), Council President for the month, said at a Headquarters press conference today.

Outlining the priorities for his country’s month-long presidency, he said: “The goal is to achieve more interaction.” The open debate on peacekeeping, to be held on 7 May, will examine questions about training and building capacity. “This is an important issue,” he emphasized, pointing out that Indonesia is currently the largest peacekeeper on the Council, with 3,000 personnel involved in eight missions. The country intends to increase the number of its female peacekeepers, he added.

He went on to state that the open debate — to be chaired by Indonesia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs — will broadly focus on enhancing peacekeeping missions. It will feature remarks by the Secretary-General and a briefing by the Force Commander of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), offering a perspective on what is expected of peacekeepers.

The 23 May open debate on protection of civilians in armed conflict is timed to coincide with the seventieth anniversary of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, he said, adding that it will also commemorate 20 years since protection has been on the Council’s agenda. With the Foreign Minister presiding, it will include remarks by the Secretary-General, as well as briefings by the President of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and members of civil society.

More broadly, the Council will hold meetings on the situations in Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as Libya, he said, noting that it will consider the Group of Five for the Sahel (G-5 Sahel). It could hold a possible Arria formula meeting on 9 May focused on the issue of settlements in Palestine. On 21 May, the Council it will hear a joint briefing by the Chairs of its 1267, 1373 and 1540 sanctions committees, he said. Members will also discuss the situation in Yemen, mandate renewals for the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA), the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) and the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), as well as the sanctions imposed on South Sudan, which are set to expire.

Speaking in his national capacity, he said Indonesia will endeavour to conduct its Council presidency in a smooth manner, using its culture and diplomacy to find unity and consensus.

In response to questions, he said the Council has not received any request for a meeting on the situation in Venezuela.

Asked about the meeting on Libya, to be held on 8 May, he said the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court will brief members on that day.

Responding to a query about the 800,000 migrants in Libya, he said efforts are under way to invite Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), to brief the Council’s 10 May meeting on the latest developments. He added that he has not received any draft resolution on the matter, recalling that the Council recently held a meeting on the ceasefire and is following developments in the country.

Asked whether the Council will move to another format for its 8 May meeting on Bosnia and Herzegovina, he said the discussion will follow its usual format, but he is open to proposals.

In response to other questions, he said the Council has invited a professor from Ohio to brief the Arria formula meeting on Palestine, as have human rights lawyers. The interactive discussion will be the most important aspect of that meeting, he emphasized.

He concluded by saying there has been request for a meeting on the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

For the full programme of work, please see www.un.org/securitycouncil/events/calendar.

For information media. Not an official record.

World: Aperçu du financement humanitaire, Mars 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

L’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale (GHO), publié le 4 décembre 2018 annonçait des besoins en financement de 21,9 milliards de dollars pour 21 Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) et le Plan régional de réponse pour les réfugiés et les migrants du Venezuela (RMRP). À la fin du mois de février, les besoins s’élevaient à 22,42 milliards de dollars et, au 31mars, le montant demandé avait atteint 25,11 milliards de dollars. L’augmentation enregistrée ce mois-ci est principalement due à la demande de 3,32 milliards de dollars pour le HRP de la Syrie qui n’avait pas été inclus dans le calcul des besoins globaux en février, la finalisation du Plan de l’Éthiopie et les besoins associés à la réponse du Cyclone tropical Idai au Mozambique. À la fin du mois de mars, le nombre de personnes dans le besoin est estimé à 140,8 millions, par rapport à 138,8 millions à la fin du mois de février, dans 54 pays.2 Un nombre plus important de personnes sont estimées être dans le besoin en Éthiopie et au Mozambique qu’en février et davantage au Yémen.
Le nombre total de personnes que les plans visent à assister est aujourd’hui de 105,7 millions par rapport à 103,7 millions en février.

L’Appel Éclair pour le Mozambique envisageait une aide à 700 000 des 815 000 personnes affectées par la sécheresse. Ce plan a été révisé suite au passage du Cyclone Idai afin d’aider 1,1 million de personnes de plus. En Éthiopie, 300 000 personnes de plus que le nombre estimé précédemment doivent recevoir une assistance. De même, le nombre de personnes devant recevoir une assistance au Yémen est de 21,4 millions au lieu des 15 millions estimés précédemment. Des millions de personnes au Yémen sont aujourd’hui plus sous l’emprise de la faim, de la maladie et d’une plus grande vulnérabilité qu’il y a un an. En Syrie, le chiffre avancé de 11,2 millions de personnes devant recevoir une assistance a été révisé à la hausse ce mois-ci pour atteindre 11,7 millions de personnes.

World: FAO Early Warning Early Action report on food security and agriculture (April – June 2019)

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security and agriculture is produced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It provides a quarterly forward-looking analysis of major disaster risks to food security and agriculture, specifically highlighting:

• potential new emergencies resulting from imminent disaster threats

• new developments in countries already affected by protracted crises which are likely to cause a further deterioration of food insecurity

This report is part of FAO’s efforts to systematically link early warnings to anticipatory actions. By providing specific early action recommendations for each country, the report aims to prompt FAO and partners to proactively mitigate and/or prevent disasters before they start to adversely impact food security.

High risk

Countries are categorized as “high risk” when there is a high likelihood of a new emergency or a significant deterioration of the current situation with potentially severe effects on agriculture and food security.

On watch

Countries categorized as “on watch” instead have a comparatively more moderate likelihood and/or potential impact, requiring close monitoring.

This report represents a summary and a prioritization of analysis provided by FAO’s corporate and joint multi-agency information and early warning systems:

• Global Information and Early Warning System on Food and Agriculture (GIEWS)

• Food Chain Crisis and Emergency Prevention System (FCC-EMPRES)

• Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) and Cadre Harmonisé

In addition to these, a number of other external sources are consulted. The list of sources is available on page vii.
Countries with ongoing emergency response efforts are not included in the report, unless there are signs of potential significant deterioration. An overview of countries worldwide with humanitarian response plans or emergency plans is provided on page vi.

More details on the risk ranking methodology and the early action recommendations are provided on page ii.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 Monthly Funding Update – March 2019

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

The Global Humanitarian Overview published on 4 December announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMPP). By the end of February, requirements had reached $22.42 billion and as at 31 March the amount requested had risen to $25.11 billion. The escalation this month is principally due to the requirement of $3.32 billion for the Syria HRP, which was not part of the calculation of overall requirements in February; the finalization of the Ethiopia plan; and the requirements for Tropical Cyclone Idai response in Mozambique.

As at the end of March, 140.8 million people, as against to 138.8 million at the end of February, are estimated to be in need in 54 countries.

More people are calculated to be in need in Ethiopia and Mozambique than in February, and more in Yemen.

The overall number of people the plans aim to assist is now 105.7 million as compared to 103.7 million in February. The Flash Appeal for Mozambique envisaged aiding 700,000 of the 815,000 drought affected people. That plan has been revised, following the passage of Cyclone Idai, to aid a further 1.1 million people. In Ethiopia, 300,000 people over and above the number estimated previously are to receive assistance. In addition, the number of people to receive assistance in Yemen has increased to 21.4 million people, rather than the 15 million previously estimated. Millions of people in Yemen are now hungrier, sicker and more vulnerable than a year ago. In Syria, the figure of 11.2 million people to receive assistance put forth in February has been revised this month to 11.7 million.

Mozambique: Five things you need to know this week about global education

Source: Theirworld
Country: Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Zimbabwe

School meals for South Sudanese children, classrooms being rebuilt in Syrian cities and the ongoing risks from Cyclone Idai are featured in our weekly news roundup.

Daily meals and education for South Sudanese children

Tens of thousands of school children in some of South Sudan’s most food-insecure areas will benefit from a new education in emergencies programme launched this week.

European Union funding worth over $27 million will provide hot daily meals to 75,000 students, help train 1,600 teachers, equip learners with educational supplies and provide psychosocial support services for 40,000 conflict-affected children.

The partnership implemented by UNICEF and the World Food Programme runs until January 2021 and will be rolled out in 150 schools.

Participating schools will be helped to establish gardens, where children can learn good farming practices while supplementing their school meals with fresh produce.

"The European Union believes in the right to quality and inclusive education for all. School children are the bright future of South Sudan," said Dr Sinead Walsh, Ambassador of the EU to South Sudan.

More schools in Mali shut down after attacks

Attacks on schools have led to a dramatic increase in the number of them shutting down in conflict-torn Mali - depriving huge numbers of children of education.

Across the country, 857 have been shut by insecurity and violence - 523 of them in Mopti region. The number of schools closed in Mopti has more than doubled in the past two years, affecting over 150,000 children, according to UNICEF.

The UN agency condemned an attack on a village in Mopti, where children made up about a third of the more than 150 people killed and over 70 injured.

"This tragic killing and maiming of defenceless children is on an unprecedented scale, said UNICEF spokesperson Christophe Boulierac. "Children’s rights to protection from all forms of violence is a moral and legal obligation and should be upheld in all circumstances."

Schools should be safe places where children can learn free from conflict, violence and fear. But Theirworld's recent report Safe Schools: The Hidden Crisis said that between 2013 and 2017 there were more than 12,700 attacks on schools, harming more than 21,000 students and educators in at least 70 countries.

... but nuns are reopening schools in Syria

Salesian nuns working in the war-torn Syrian cities of Aleppo and Damascus are starting construction projects to reopen schools and centres for children.

Since the Syrian conflict began, Salesian Missions has continued to run three centres in Kafroun, Aleppo and Damascus. They provide educational classes, meeting spaces, and social development and sporting activities for young people and their families.

They also offer trauma counselling, emergency shelter, nutritious meals and medical referrals.

Sister Vilma Tallone said: "After this huge tragedy, we must rebuild and this is why we are raising funds to support the three structures already functioning in the country and to build two new schools in Aleppo and Damascus for children and pre-teens."

About two million children in Syria are still out of school.

Cyclone children face risk of trafficking or early marriage

Thousands of children who survived a cyclone in southeast Africa face fresh risks in its aftermath - being sold into slavery by human traffickers or forced into early marriage by families struggling to survive, aid workers say.

Traffickers often prey on lone children caught up in chaotic scenes such as Cyclone Idai, they said, while parents might marry off their young girls as they struggle to eke out a life.

With the United Nations estimating up to a million children affected in Mozambique alone, aid workers are particularly concerned about orphaned children and those separated from their families who are fending for themselves almost two weeks on.

Rik Goverde from Save the Children said: "Children are out there on their own - without the supervision or care of a trustworthy adult. They can easily fall victim to sexual violence or human trafficking. We are aware and very concerned about it."

Aid workers say young girls could also be forced to wed as parents who have lost homes and crops in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe are pushed to the brink and seek ways to ease the burden on the rest of the family.

"Mozambique is already among the top 10 countries in the world with the highest rates of child marriage - around 48% of girls are married before 18," said Anne Hoff, Plan International's Country Director in Mozambique.

Blackouts in Venezuela hit education again

Two weeks after a blackout closed schools across crisis-torn Venezuela for several days, many were shut down again this week.

Schools and workplaces have been empty following the latest electricity failure on Monday, leaving residents scrambling to find food and water.

The Venezuelan government claimed its power system had been attacked - but electricity experts say the outages are the result of inadequate maintenance and incompetent management of the power grid.

Their News told earlier this month how the economic crisis in the country is wrecking education and hope for millions of children.

World: The Aid in Danger Monthly News Brief, February 2019

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Africa

Central African Republic

07 - 10 February 2019: In Kaga Bandoro region, Nana Gribizi prefecture, the outbreak of fires in close proximity to an IDP site left 31 people injured and resulted in shelters and personal items being damaged, as well as a resulting in the partial destruction of a mobile clinic. An estimated 4,500 people were affected by the fires, resulting in humanitarian agencies in Kaga Bandoro planning a renewed push to provide non-food items, health care, food, water, sanitation, hygiene, and education. Further, humanitarian agencies began drive to inform IDP protectors about fire prevention in the area. Source: UN-OCHA

Burkina Faso

02 February 2019: In Kongoussi region, militants presumed to be from Ansaroul Islam (JNIM) attacked and stole a Burkina Faso Red Cross vehicle, abducting its four passengers and driver in the process. Source: ACLED1

Chad

19 February 2019: In Ngouboua locality, Lac region, armed assailants entered the Bouraboura IDP camp - home to over 1,000 displaced people - and opened fire, killing five and wounding four others. A further attack targeted a village home to around 365 displaced people, and where four people were abducted. There is limited security in the region and an upsurge in violence in neighbouring Nigeria has led to large numbers of civilians fleeing across the border into Chad. Source: UN-OCHA

Democratic Republic of Congo

24 February 2019: In Katwa town, North Kivu province, an area where mistrust in international aid efforts and false rumours about treatment are rampant, unidentified perpetrators threw stones at an MSF-run Ebola treatment centre before setting parts of the structure on fire, killing one person, and injuring another. In response, MSF suspended its operations in the area. Sources: ABC News, Africa News, Axios, Devex, IRIN, MSF, Reuters, Time, The Guardian, The Telegraph, The Washington Times and VOA News

27 February 2019: In Butembo city, North Kivu province, an area where mistrust in aid workers and false rumours about treatment are rampant, unidentified perpetrators set vehicles and parts of an MSF-run Ebola treatment centre on fire, destroying medical wards and equipment, and leaving four patients missing. This attack has also put the lives of patients and MSF and Health Ministry staff in danger. In response, MSF suspended its operations in the area. Sources: Axios, CIDRAP, Devex,
IRIN, MSF, Reuters, Time, The Guardian and The Washington Times

Kenya

22 February 2019: Update: In Chakama village, Kilifi county, villagers and security forces have suggested that an Italian aid worker who was abducted by suspected al Shabaab-linked perpetrators on 21 November 2018 may have been involved in a multimillion shilling ivory trade and kidnapped after her partners soured on the deal. Source: Esoft

Mali

15 February 2019: In Bourem district, Gao region, two armed individuals abducted a team of aid workers before releasing them the following day, taking their vehicle and personal belongings in the process. No harm was reported to have come to the aid workers. Source: UN-OCHA

Nigeria

28 January 2019: In Rann town, Borno state, Boko Haram militants on motorcycles attacked and set fire to hundreds of structures serving as shelters for IDPs, killing at least 60 people. Source:
News 24 February 2019: In Bama locality, Borno state, large population displacements have resulted in an unspecified IDP camp becoming overwhelmed with newly displaced people, local schools being unable to cope with the numbers of children, and poor living conditions for camp occupants. Source: UN-OCHA 07 February 2019: In Monguno town, Borno state, an outbreak of fire at the Stadium IDP camp left two children and one elderly person dead, five others with burn injuries, and a total of 7,839 having been directly affected through the destruction of their homes and property, including valuables and food. The fire had allegedly started from a cooking area in the camp. Local agencies responded by attempting to increase awareness on fire outbreak risks and mitigation. Source: UN-OCHA

Somalia

28 February 2019: In Gedo region, suspected al Shabaab militants kidnapped six national aid workers. Around ten people were initially reported kidnapped but some of the group successfully escaped the kidnappers to alert authorities. Source: AWSD2 and BBC News

South Sudan

02 February 2019: In Bor town, Jonglei state, four unidentified perpetrators assaulted a male South Sudanese national UN staff member after blaming him for the perceived increase in the number of non-national staff members in the country 'stealing jobs' from nationals, leaving him with minor injuries. Source: AWSD2 21 February 2019: In Bor town, Jonglei state, a staff member from an INGO who was distributing food inside the UN-run Protection of Civilians site was assaulted by an IDP under unspecified circumstances. The staff member received minor injuries. Source: AWSD2

Sudan

08 February 2019: In North Darfur state, a group of government-backed militiamen attempted to rape nine women in the Kassab IDP camp. The women fought back and four were seriously wounded due to stabbing injuries and were treated in hospital. Source: ACLED1 09 February 2019: In Abyei region, an Ethiopian military helicopter crashed inside the compound of the UN Peacekeeping Mission, killing all three passengers on board, and injuring 10 more.
Source: ANN 14 February 2019: In North Darfur state, a protest was held at the Zamzam IDP camp to demonstrate against the rape of five women the previous week as well as in opposition to the rule of President Bashir. The security forces responded by violently suppressing the protest with tear gas and batons. Sources: ACLED1 and Star Tribune

Afghanistan: R2P Monitor, Issue 44 (15 March 2019)

Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab R...

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 1, March 2019

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

COUNTRIES REQUIRING EXTERNAL ASSISTANCE FOR FOOD

FAO assesses that globally 41 countries, of which 31 are in Africa, continue to be in need of external assistance for food.
Conflict remains the main driver of high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather‑induced production declines and economic instability have also adversely impacted on food availability and access.

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA

Mostly reflecting beneficial weather conditions, production upturns were estimated in East, West and North Africa in 2018, while rainfall deficits cut outputs in Southern Africa. Continued poor rains have also affected the development of the 2019 crops in parts of Southern Africa, while conflicts in several other countries continue to curtail production prospects this year.

ASIA

Cereal production in 2018 in Far East Asia is estimated at a record high.
By contrast, outputs fell in the Near East and CIS Asia on account of rainfall deficits and the impact of conflicts in parts of the Near East. Production prospects for the soon‑to‑be harvested 2019 wheat crop are generally favourable across the region.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Cereal production is expected to increase in South America in 2019, recovering from last year’s reduced output. In Central America and the Caribbean, despite localized dry weather conditions, cereal outputs in 2018 were close to the average. The 2019 wheat crop in Mexico is likely to remain below average.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals [EN/AR/FR]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update February 2019 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

UN-Coordinated Appeals

The GHO published on 4 December 2018 announced funding requirements of $21.9 billion for 21 Humanitarian Response Plans and the Venezuela Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan (RMRP). With the inclusion of the Zimbabwe Flash Appeal last month, funding requirements for UN-led appeals as at end February amounted to $22.42 billion.

Of 138.8 million people estimated to be in need of assistance, the humanitarian response plans envisage assisting 103.7 million.

In January, the humanitarian country team in Burkina Faso deemed it necessary to draw up an Emergency Plan for Burkina Faso, which was issued on 15 February. It appealed for $100 million to assist 898,000 people highly affected by the upsurge in violence in the north and other parts of the country. For the first time, Burkina Faso is confronted with internal displacement – 83,000 people have fled their homes and it is expected that more displacement will follow.

A Flash Appeal for Zimbabwe was released at the end of February and Humanitarian response plans included in the GHO for 2019 were finalized for Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Haiti, Libya, Iraq, Mali, Niger and Yemen.

The HRP for the Democratic Republic of Congo has now been launched. In spite of challenges in reaching vulnerable people, the vastness of the area to be covered and limited logistical infrastructure, humanitarian partners delivered life-saving assistance and protection to close to 3 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018. An update of the three-year HRP for the Democratic Republic of the Congo was finalized in mid-January and requests $1.65 billion to assist 9 million people in 2019.

1 February: The 2019 HRP for Niger launched in Niamey on 1 February 2019 calls for $383 million to assist 1.6 million of the 2.3 million people in need in Niger due to chronic vulnerabilities including food deprivation, land degradation, migration and security threats. In Niger, the poorest country in the world, over 370,000 children under the age of five are severely malnourished.

15 February: The 2019 Joint Response Plan for the Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis finalized by the Government of Bangladesh and the UN country team on 15 February requires $920.5 million to meet protection and life-saving needs of Rohingya people who have fled Rakhine State and live for the most part in highly congested camps. Others live with host communities. The funding will also support activities to aid Bangladeshi host communities severely affected by this crisis.

18 February: The UN and the Government launched the 2019 HRP for Libya in Tripoli, seeking $202 million to provide health, protection, water and shelter for 552,000 of the most vulnerable people in the country. In the past four years the UN and partners have increased humanitarian access and built strong partnerships with national and local organizations and municipalities. Humanitarian action will be crucial for the stability of Libya this year and in the future.

World: CrisisWatch February 2019

Source: International Crisis Group
Country: Afghanistan, Aland Islands (Finland), Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, the Republic of North Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview

February saw a dangerous escalation between India and Pakistan. In Yemen, the warring parties took a small step to cement a ceasefire in Hodeida, but a breakdown of talks could trigger new clashes. Fighting in Libya’s south intensified and could worsen, and Chad called in French airstrikes to halt a rebel advance. Al-Shabaab stepped up deadly attacks in Somalia, and in South Sudan a government offensive against rebels in the south is picking up steam. Sudan’s President al-Bashir took a harder line against persistent protests. Suspected jihadists stepped up attacks in Burkina Faso; violence escalated in Cameroon’s Anglophone region; and Angola’s separatists announced a return to arms. In Nigeria, election-related violence rose and could flare again around polls to elect governors in March, while there are growing concerns around Ukraine’s upcoming presidential vote. The confrontation hardened between Venezuelan President Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó. In Haiti, anti-government protests turned violent. U.S.-Russia relations deteriorated further in a worrying development for the future of arms control. On a positive note, Taliban and U.S. officials resumed talks on a deal for Afghanistan, negotiations aimed at ending the Western Sahara conflict are planned for March, and Nicaragua’s government resumed dialogue with opposition leaders, raising hopes for an end to the political crisis.

Mali: Security Council Report Monthly Forecast, March 2019

Source: Security Council Report
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Yemen

Overview

France will hold the presidency in March. France and Germany, the Council president in April, will hold a “joint presidency” covering both months.

There will be one open debate on combating the financing of terrorism, during which a resolu-tion may be adopted.

The Council is expected to carry out a visiting mission to Mali. A briefing on the visiting mission and a ministerial meeting on Mali with the par-ticipation of Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubèye Maïga are scheduled shortly after the delegation returns.

Regarding other African issues, there will be briefings, followed by consultations, on South Sudan (UNMISS), the DRC (MONUSCO), and the Great Lakes Region. Consultations are also anticipated on Libya (UNSMIL) and the 1970 Libya sanctions regime. The Council is scheduled to adopt resolutions renewing the mandates of UNMISS, MONUSCO, and UNSOM (Somalia).

The Council will be briefed on Yemen on the implementation of resolution 2452, which estab-lished the UN Mission to support the Hodeidah Agreement (UNMHA). It will also receive the monthly briefings on the humanitarian situation, the political process and the use of chemical weap-ons in Syria.

Other Middle East issues that will be consid-ered include:

• Israel/Palestine, the regular monthly meeting;
• Lebanon, an update on the implementation of resolution 1701, which called for a cessation of hostilities between the Shi’a militant group Hezbollah and Israel in 2006; and
• UNDOF in the Golan Heights, the quarterly report and most recent developments.

Two meetings are anticipated on European issues: Federica Mogherini, the EU High Repre-sentative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, is expected to brief the Council on UN-EU coop-eration in maintaining international peace and security; and Slovakian Foreign Minister Miro-slav Lajčák, the current Chairperson-in-Office for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), will brief on OSCE activities.

Council members anticipate a briefing on Haiti (MINUJUSTH), most likely from Special Representative and head of MINUJUSTH, Helen Meagher La Lime, and will also consider the most recent report on the implementation of resolution 2410—which set a timeline for the gradual draw-down of formed police units—and political and security developments in the context of the 15 April expiry of MINUJUSTH’s mandate.

In a change of practice, the Council will hold its quarterly meeting on Afghanistan (UNAMA)as a briefing, followed by consultations, rather than in debate format, prior to renewing the mis-sion’s mandate later in the month.

The Council is also expected to adopt a resolu-tion renewing the mandate of the Panel of Experts of the 1718 DPRK Sanctions Committee.

A briefing of the 1540 Sanctions Committee is also anticipated during the month.

There will be an informal interactive dialogue on the Middle East region. Arria-formula meet-ings are anticipated on women’s participation in peace processes, on Crimea, and on criminal jus-tice and human rights.

Council members will continue to follow closely developments in Venezuela and may meet on this and other issues not on the programme as needed.

World: Human Rights Council to hold its fortieth regular session from 25 February to 22 March 2019

Source: UN Human Rights Council
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Colombia, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Guatemala, Honduras, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Libya, Mali, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

GENEVA (21 February 2019) - The United Nations Human Rights Council will hold its fortieth regular session from 25 February to 22 March 2019 in the Human Rights and Alliance of Civilizations Room at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

The session will open at 9 a.m. on Monday, 25 February under the presidency of Ambassador Coly Seck of Senegal, with key statements delivered by United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres; United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet; the President of the United Nations General Assembly María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés; and the Federal Councillor and Head of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland Ignazio Cassis.

A three-day high-level segment will follow the session opening, during which senior officials from more than 90 States and international and regional organizations will highlight human rights issues of national and international interest and concern.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights will present her annual report to the Council on 6 March, to be followed by an interactive discussion with States and non-governmental organizations the following day. Thematic and country reports of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Office of the High Commissioner, and the Secretary-General will also be presented, including reports or oral briefings on Colombia, Cyprus, Guatemala, Honduras, Iran, Venezuela and Yemen, and on promoting reconciliation, accountability and human rights in Sri Lanka.

On 25 February, the Council will hold a high-level discussion on human rights mainstreaming that will examine human rights in the light of multilateralism, on 26 February it will examine the question of human rights violations related to the use of the death penalty in the context of its biennial high-level discussion on the issue, while on 15 March, it will commemorate the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination with a debate on the mitigation and countering of rising nationalist populism and extreme supremacist ideologies.

The Council will review over 120 reports on a wide range of issues presented by more than 35 human rights experts, groups and mechanisms, including the report of the Special Rapporteur on human rights and the environment which draws attention to the negative impact of air pollution and recommends actions to be considered as part of national air quality plans; the presentation by the Independent Expert on foreign debt on the guiding principles on human rights impact assessments of economic reforms; and the report on the situation of women human rights defenders in which the Special Rapporteur on human rights defenders reviews obstacles they face and provides good practice examples to support the building of diverse, inclusive and strong movements of women human rights defenders.

The report by the Special Rapporteur on cultural rights marks the tenth anniversary of the mandate and contains strategies for advancing cultural rights during the next decade, while the Independent Expert on human rights of persons with albinism explores barriers to access to justice for this group. The Council will also hold interactive dialogues with the Special Rapporteurs on the right to food; torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to privacy in the digital age; the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorism; adequate housing; freedom of religion; and the rights of persons with disabilities, who will present a thematic study on disability-specific forms of deprivation of liberty.

The Council will discuss, inter alia, the human rights situation in Syria with the Independent International Commission of Inquiry, which will present an updated written report. On Myanmar, it will hear the High Commissioner’s update on the situation of human rights of Rohingya Muslims and other minorities, and an update by the Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Myanmar. The Council will hear the High Commissioner present an oral update on the situation in Eritrea, which will be further discussed during an enhanced interactive dialogue. The Council will also dialogue with the Commission of Inquiry on Burundi, the Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan, and the mandate holders on the human rights situation in Iran and in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

On the human rights situation in Palestine and other occupied Arab territories, the Council will hold an interactive dialogue with the Special Rapporteur and will discuss the final report of the Commission of Inquiry in relation to the military assaults on the large-scale civilian protests that began on 30 March 2018.

On the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Council will hear the High Commissioner’s oral update on the developments of the human rights situation in the Kasai region and her report on the situation of human rights before, during and after the elections of 23 December 2018, and will hold an enhanced interactive dialogue on technical assistance to this country. Further, interactive discussions with the Independent Expert on Mali and on the High Commissioner’s oral presentation on the situation in Ukraine will also be held, as will a high-level dialogue to assess the situation of human rights in the Central African Republic. The Council will consider the High Commissioner for Human Rights reports on Libya and Afghanistan, the report on the work of the Board of Trustees of the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Technical Cooperation in the Field of Human Rights, and will hear the annual oral presentation by the High Commissioner for Human Rights on successes, best practices and challenges in technical assistance and capacity-building efforts.

Other highlights of the session will be the annual interactive debate on the rights of persons with disabilities on 6 March, which will focus on article 26 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on habilitation and rehabilitation. On 4 March, the Council will hold its annual full-day meeting on the rights of the child, which will address the question of empowering children with disabilities, including through inclusive education. Also, the Council will engage with the Special Rapporteur on the sale and sexual exploitation of children who will present a thematic study on the sale and sexual exploitation of children in the context of sports; the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on violence against children; and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on children in armed conflict who in her report explores the issue of the abduction of children by parties to a conflict and children of or recruited as foreign fighters.

The Council will also hear the presentation of a thematic study on statelessness as a minority issue by the Special Rapporteur, and the reports by the Forum on Minority Issues, the 2018 Social Forum, the Forum on Human Rights, Democracy and the Rule of Law, and the Special Procedures annual report. Further, it will consider the report of the Intergovernmental Working Group on the Effective Implementation of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action and the High Commissioner’s report on the implementation of the action plan to combat intolerance, stigmatization, discrimination and violence against persons based on religion or belief.

The Council will consider and adopt the final outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of 14 States (Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, Mexico, Mauritius, Jordan, Malaysia, Central African Republic, Monaco, Belize, Chad, China and Malta), and appoint four Special Procedure mandate holders as members of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The Council will hold nine general debates during the session: the general debate on the High Commissioner’s oral update will start on 7 March, and the general debate on the promotion and protection of all human rights on 8 March. On 13 March, the Council will hold two general debates, on human rights situations that require the Council’s attention, and on human rights bodies and mechanisms. The general debate on the Universal Periodic Review will take place on 15 March, and on 18 March the Council will hold general debates on the human rights situation in Palestine and other occupied Arab territories, and on follow-up to and implementation of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action. The general debate on racism and racial discrimination will be held on 19 March, and on technical assistance and capacity-building on 20 and 21 March.

The Council will take action on decisions and resolutions on 21 and 22 March before concluding the session.

Further information on the fortieth session can be found here, including the annotated agenda, the detailed programme of work, and the reports to be presented.

The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the United Nations system, made up of 47 States which are responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe. The Council was created by the United Nations General Assembly on 15 March 2006 with the main purpose of addressing situations of human rights violations and making recommendations on them.

The composition of the Human Rights Council at its fortieth session is as follows: Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chile, China, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, Eritrea, Fiji, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Slovakia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Kingdom and Uruguay.

The President of the Human Rights Council in 2019 is Coly Seck, Permanent Representative of Senegal to the United Nations Office at Geneva. The Council’s four Vice Presidents are Vesna Batistić Kos of Croatia, Harald Aspelund of Iceland, Carlos Mario Foradori of Argentina, and Nazhat Shameem Khan of Fiji.

For further information and media requests, please contact Rolando Gómez (+ 41 22 917 9711 / rgomez@ohchr.org), Cédric Sapey (+ 41 22 917 9845 / csapey@ohchr.org) or Sarah Lubbersen (+ 41 22 917 9813 / slubbersen@ohchr.org).

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