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World: World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Introduction

World Humanitarian Data and Trends presents global- and country-level data-and-trend analysis about humanitarian crises and assistance. Its purpose is to consolidate this information and present it in an accessible way, providing policymakers, researchers and humanitarian practitioners with an evidence base to support humanitarian policy decisions and provide context for operational decisions.

The information presented covers two main areas: humanitarian needs and assistance in 2017, and humanitarian trends, challenges and opportunities. The report intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the global humanitarian landscape, and to highlight major trends in the nature of humanitarian crises, their drivers, and the actors that participate in prevention, response and recovery. The 2018 edition builds on previous iterations of the report, providing an overview of 2017 as well as selected case studies that can be used for humanitarian advocacy. Previous editions of the report have featured a reference table showing selected indicators by country.
This table will be available online to facilitate exploring the data and performing analysis.

There are many gaps in the available information due to the complexity of humanitarian crises. Even the concepts of humanitarian needs and assistance are flexible. There are also inherent biases in the information. For example, assistance provided by communities and by local and national Governments is less likely to be reported. The outcomes and impact of assistance are difficult to measure and rarely reported. Funding data is more available than other types of information. There are also limitations on the availability and quality of data. Further information on limitations is provided in the ‘User’s Guide’.

The data presented in this report is from a variety of source organizations with the mandate, resources and expertise to collect and compile relevant data, as well as OCHAmanaged processes and tools, such as the inter-agency appeal process and the Financial Tracking Service (FTS). All the data presented in this report is publicly available through the source organizations and through the report’s own data set (available through the Humanitarian Data Exchange). Further information on data sources is provided in the ‘User’s Guide’.

World Humanitarian Data and Trends is an initiative of the Policy Analysis and Innovation Section of OCHA’s Policy Development and Studies Branch. This report is just one part of OCHA’s efforts to improve data and analysis on humanitarian situations worldwide and build a humanitarian data community. This edition of the report was developed with internal and external partners, whose contributions are listed in the ‘Sources and References’ section. OCHA extends its sincere gratitude to all those partners for their time, expertise and contributions.

Interpreting the visuals and data

The report uses many visual representations of humanitarian data and trends. There is also some limited narrative text and analysis, which provides basic orientation and helps to guide individual interpretation. However, there may be multiple ways to interpret the same information.

The ‘User’s Guide’ contains more detailed methodological information and specific technical notes for each figure. Readers are encouraged to refer to the technical notes for more detailed descriptions of decisions and assumptions made in presenting the data.

For the latest information on needs and funding requirements for current strategic response plans or inter-agency appeals, see fts.unocha.org/ .

Accessing the data and exploring the report online

All the data presented in this report can be downloaded through the Humanitarian Data Exchange (https://data.humdata.org/dataset/world-humanitariandata-and-trends). The report itself can be explored through its interactive companion microsite www.unocha.org/datatrends2018/ .

World: Global Slavery Index Regional Report: Africa 2018

Source: Walk Free Foundation
Country: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Spotlight on Progress

Although African countries face challenges in effectively responding to all forms of modern slavery, many countries in the region are taking steps to strengthen their responses. Improvements in the legislative framework have occurred across the region with some notable examples. Côte d’Ivoire,Morocco, and Tunisia enacted comprehensive trafficking legislation in 2016 – a new development since the 2016 Global Slavery Index. As a result, in 2017, nearly 70 percent of African countries had criminalised human trafficking, an increase from the nearly 60 percent reported in the previous Global Slavery Index in 2016.

Kenya has demonstrated increasing efforts to eliminate modern slavery. In 2016, the government assigned labour attachés to Kenyan missions in Qatar, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Saudi Arabia to protect vulnerable citizens employed in those countries. This is in response to the exploitation of large numbers of Kenyans migrating to the Middle East every year. These individuals are generally lured by promises of work, in the hope of sending remittances back to their families in Kenya. Instead they are exploited and abused by their employers. Overall, Kenya improved its government responses rating since the 2016 Global Slavery Index (from a CC rating to a CCC rating).

When compared with countries that have stronger economies, Sierra Leone also stands out as taking relatively robust action. Most notably, Sierra Leone’s coordination body, the Inter-Agency Human Trafficking Task Force, resumed activities in 2015 and approved the 2015-2020 National Action Plan. There is also evidence that an informal National Referral Mechanism has been implemented in Sierra Leone and is being used by the government and NGOs to refer victims of modern slavery.Elsewhere in the region, some governments are to be commended for collaborative efforts to end modern slavery. The Nigerian government is collaborating with the UK’s National Crime Agency, Border Force, and the Crown Prosecution Service to build its capacity to respond to human trafficking, including joint operations at Gatwick and Heathrow airports on profiling and identifying victims of trafficking and suspected traffickers. The governments of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana have taken steps to work with business and civil society to end the worst forms of child labour in the production of cocoa under the Harkin-Engel Protocol and the associated International Cocoa Initiative.Although the effectiveness of the protocol in reducing the number of children in hazardous child labour has been questioned, it is an important example of cross-sectoral collaboration – a critical factor in eliminating modern slavery from the economy.

World: Aperçu de la Situation Humanitaire Mondiale 2019 – Version Abrégée

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale

PERSONNES DANS
LE BESOIN 131,7M

PERSONNES DEVANT
RECEVOIR UNE AIDE 93,6M

BESOINS FINANCIERS *
USD 21,9Md

Tendances et défis mondiaux

Malgré les progrès du développement mondial, une personne sur 70 dans le monde est en proie à
une crise et a besoin d’assistance humanitaire et de protection d’urgence.

De plus en plus de personnes sont déplacées par les conflits. Le nombre de personnes déplacées
de force est passé de 59,5 millions en 2014 à 68,5 millions en 2017.

Les catastrophes naturelles et le changement climatique ont un coût humain élevé. Les
catastrophes affectent 350 millions de personnes en moyenne chaque année et causent des
milliards de dollars de dégâts.

L’insécurité alimentaire est en augmentation. En juste deux ans, entre 2015 et 2017, le nombre
de personnes confronté à l’insécurité alimentaire de niveau critique ou pire a augmenté de 80
millions à 124 millions de personnes.

Les crises exacerbent les inégalités entre les sexes. Dans les situations de conflit, les filles ont
une probabilité 2,5 fois plus importante que les garçons d’être déscolarisées.

Les crises humanitaires affectent un plus grand nombre de personnes et durent plus longtemps.
Le nombre de personnes ciblées pour recevoir une assistance dans le cadre des Plans de réponse
humanitaire (HRP) des Nations unies a augmenté de 77 millions en 2014 à 101 millions en 2018.

Les crises humanitaires durent aujourd’hui, en moyenne, plus de neuf ans. Près de trois-quarts
des personnes ciblées pour recevoir de l’assistance en 2018 se trouvent dans des pays affectés
par une crise humanitaire depuis sept ans ou plus.

Les organisations humanitaires réussissent de plus en plus à sauver des vies et à réduire les
souffrances mais de nombreux besoins restent encore sans réponse.

Malgré une augmentation importante des financements de 10,6 milliards de dollars en 2014 à
13,9 milliards de dollars en 2017, le manque de financement des plans de réponse humanitaire
des Nations unies stagne à environ 40%.

2018 est en passe d’être une autre année record pour le financement humanitaire. Au 19
novembre, les donateurs et partenaires avaient fait état de contributions de 13,9 milliards de
dollars aux Plans de réponse humanitaire par rapport à 12,6 milliards de dollars à la même
période l’année dernière.

Les niveaux de financement ont également augmenté. Au 19 novembre, le financement des Plans
de réponse était de 56% par rapport à 52% à la même période en 2018.

Le financement humanitaire mondial a atteint un nouveau summum de 22 milliards de dollars par
rapport aux 21,5 milliards de dollars levés en 2017.

Les crises majeures et prolongées reçoivent la majorité des ressources. Entre 2014 et 2018,
quatre crises – en Somalie, au Soudan du Sud, au Soudan et en Syrie – ont comptabilisé à elles
seules 55% de tous les financements demandés et reçus.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 – Abridged version [EN/AR/ES/ZH]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

At a glance

PEOPLE IN NEED 131.7M
PEOPLE TO RECEIVE AID 93.6M
FUNDING REQUIRED* $21.9B

Global trends and challenges

Despite global development gains, one in every 70 people around the world is caught up in crisis and urgently needs humanitarian assistance and protection.

More people are being displaced by conflict. The number of forcibly displaced people rose from 59.5 million in 2014 to 68.5 million in 2017.

Natural disasters and climate change have a high human cost. Disasters affect 350 million people on average each year and cause billions of dollars of damage.

Food insecurity is rising. In just two years between 2015 and 2017, the number of people experiencing crisis-level food insecurity or worse increased from 80 million to 124 million people.

Crises exacerbate gender inequalities. Girls in conflict settings are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than boys.

Humanitarian crises affect more people, for longer. The number of people targeted to receive assistance through UN-led humanitarian response plans (HRPs) increased from 77 million in 2014 to 101 million in 2018.

The average humanitarian crisis now lasts more than nine years. Nearly three quarters of people targeted to receive assistance in 2018 are in countries affected by humanitarian crisis for seven years or more.

Humanitarian organizations are increasingly successful in saving lives and reducing suffering, but many needs still remain unmet.

Despite a significant increase in funding, from $10.6 billion in 2014 to $13.9 billion in 2017, the gap in coverage for UN-led humanitarian response plans hovers at about 40 per cent. 2018 is on track to be another record year for humanitarian funding. As of 19 November, donors and partners have reported contributions of $13.9 billion to HRPs, compared with $12.6 billion at the same time last year.

Coverage rates have also increased. As of 19 November, coverage for HRPs was at 56 per cent, compared with 52 per cent at the same time in 2018.

Global humanitarian funding has reached a new high of $22 billion, surpassing the $21.5 billion raised in 2017.

Large protracted crises command the majority of resources. Between 2014 and 2018, just four crises – Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Syria – accounted for 55 per cent of all funding requested and received.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update November 2018 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Launch of the Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 and the World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018 At the end of November 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) require US$ US$24.93 to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The requirements are lower than announced at the end of October ($25.2 billion) as those for Ethiopia have now been reduced. The plans are funded at $14.29 billion; this amounts to 57.3 per cent of financial requirements for 2018.

Two million less people are considered to be in need in Mali than at the end of October, hence the reduction in the overall number of people in need in this month’s overview.

Global requirements are $1.8 billion higher than at this time in 2017, and the amount of funding received is $1.69 billion higher than it was at this time last year.

On 4 December 2018, the USG/ERC launched the Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 and World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018 at an event in the Council Chamber, United Nations Office of Geneva. The event was attended by almost 200 representatives of Member States, intergovernmental and international organizations, UN organizations and NGOs, and by the Red Cross movement, the World Economic Forum and specialized meteorological foundations. A recording of the event can be found here: Event in Geneva to launch the GHO 2019 and WHDT 2018.

Pooled Funds In 2018, as of early December, country-based pooled funds (CBPF) received a total of US$845 million, once again setting a new record in annual contributions. Generous support from 31 Member States, from one crown dependency and from the general public through the UN Foundation, continues to demonstrate a high level of confidence in this mechanism for reaching the people most affected by humanitarian emergencies. In the past year, CBPFs have allocated a total $695 million, with $81 million awaiting approval. The Yemen Humanitarian Fund (HF) remains the largest of the funds, with $187 million already allocated towards response to urgent humanitarian needs. The HFs in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, South Sudan and Turkey each allocated over $50 million. Globally, three-fifths of all CBPF allocations were disbursed to NGOs, including 24 per cent ($170 million) directly to national and local NGOs. Another two-fifths were allocated to UN agencies, while Red Cross/ Red Crescent organizations received 1 percent of funding ($8 million).

Between 1 January and 30 November 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved $488 million in grants from the Central Emergency

Response Fund (CERF), including $308 million from the Rapid Response Window and $180 million from the Underfunded Emergencies Window.

The grants will support life-saving activities in 48 countries. In November, a total of $11 million was released to scale-up response to cholera in Nigeria and pneumonic plague in Madagascar, as well as to expand existing UN programmes in Venezuela in support of government efforts to increase essential health and nutrition services.

World: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 49: 1 – 7 December 2018 Data as reported by 17:00; 7 December 2018

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Princ...

World: Corpus de papiers sur les transferts monétaires et le genre dans les contextes humanitaires

Source: Cash Learning Partnership
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Greece, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, P...

World: Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Virolainen: Finland grants EUR 5.45 million to alleviate crises in Africa and increases funding for the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund

Source: Government of Finland
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Finland, Niger, South Sudan, World

According to the recently published Global Humanitarian Overview, the estimated total need of humanitarian assistance in 2019 amounts to EUR 22 billion.

This means that 132 million people in approximately 40 countries are in need of emergency relief, the majority of them in Africa and the Middle East.

The world’s worst humanitarian crisis is currently in Yemen, but the situation is extremely difficult also in Syria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Nigeria and South Sudan.

"Unfortunately, the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance remains high, mainly because of protracted conflicts. Finland's aim is to continue effective and timely provision of support to people in distress even in difficult conditions," Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Anne-Mari Virolainen says.

In its funding decisions made towards the end of 2018, Finland paid special attention to Africa. Through these decisions, Finland supported the work of the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR in the Democratic Republic of the Congo by EUR 2 million, in South Sudan by EUR 1.5 million, and in Nigeria by EUR 1 million. Additionally, Finland granted EUR 950,000 to Ethiopia through the Red Cross. These countries are all suffering from internal and regional conflicts, and emergency relief is needed to save lives. Finland's support is needed because the large humanitarian assistance operations in Africa are under-funded and because Finland's funding decisions made earlier in the year focus on crises in the Middle East, above all on Yemen and Syria. Earlier this year, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs decided to grant EUR 100,000 to the Red Cross for it to be able to mobilise an emergency unit to Indonesia following the earthquake that hit the Sulawesi province.

In 2018, Finland's humanitarian assistance was EUR 72.5 million in total, of which the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR received the most support (EUR 20 million) while the Syria crisis was the biggest regional recipient of assistance (EUR 12.6 million). Finland's support for humanitarian assistance work in Yemen has been EUR three million this year.

The majority of the funding decisions for 2019 will be prepared at the beginning of the year. At the Annual CERF High-level Pledging Event in New York on 7 December, Finland announced that it will raise its funding for the UN's Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) by one million euros next year, after which the support will be EUR 8 million. CERF is a fund, which enables the provision of emergency response in the event of an urgent crisis and in cases where an operation is suffering from serious lack of funding. By way of example, this year CERF has allocated USD 50 million to humanitarian action in Yemen.

For more detailed information, please read about the recipients of Finland's humanitarian assistance in 2018: https://um.fi/documents/35732/0/humanitaarinen+apu+2018+%282%29.pdf/24c88d2e-a294-24a9-5425-712a20cbeb6b

Inquiries: Claus Jerker Lindroos, Director, tel. +358 295 351 234, and Pilvi Taipale, Desk Officer, Unit for Humanitarian Assistance and Policy, +358 295 350 322

The Foreign Ministry's email addresses are of the format firstname.lastname@formin.fi.

World: Rights today in Africa – 2018

Source: Amnesty International
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, World, Zambia

The “third struggle” for freedom in Africa

When the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the UN in 1948, much of Africa was still in its first struggle for liberation from colonial rule. Only three African countries were present at the UN for the vote: Egypt, Ethiopia and South Africa. Apartheid South Africa abstained.

After independence came the struggle to guarantee human rights in law and practice, often against a backdrop of one-party states, brutal repression and persecution of dissenters.

Today, the struggle is far from won, but the intervening decades have seen extraordinary progress.

Human rights defenders’ tireless campaigning, often at great personal risk, has led to the Universal Declaration’s founding principles - including freedom from fear and want - being enshrined in regional human rights treaties, including the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, as well as in the national laws of most, if not all, African countries.

But the struggle continues: a fierce “third” struggle to make national laws and regional human rights obligations and commitments worth more than just the paper they are written on. While sub-Saharan African states have become adept at speaking the language of human rights, too many continued in 2018 to brutally repress dissent and restrict the space in which individuals and organizations can defend human rights.

State-sponsored intimidation and harassment

In the south, critics of the Zambian government have been harassed and charged on spurious grounds. The most prominent example involves the ongoing trial of six activists, including rapper Fumba Chama (also known as Pilato), who were arrested in September for protesting against exorbitant levels of government spending.

Mozambique imposed prohibitively high accreditation fees

on journalists and media houses in July, in an attempt to clamp down on independent reporting. In March, Ericino de Salema, a journalist, was kidnapped and beaten, contributing to a growing climate of fear. The continuing persecution faced by environmental rights activists in Madagascar is illustrated by the suspended sentences against Raleva and Christopher Manenjika which were confirmed on appeal in May and June respectively.

In Niger, Moussa Tchangari, Ali Idrissa, Nouhou Arzika and Lirwana Abdourahmane, prominent activists, were detained in March for organizing protests against a new finance law. Lirwana Abdourahmane remains in jail. The **Sierra Leonean **authorities continue to restrict peaceful demonstrations
, while the killings of protesters by police go unpunished. In Togo, authorities arrested pro-democracy activists including Atikpo Bob in January. Naïm Touré, an online activist in Burkina Faso, was sentenced to two months in prison in July for a Facebook post. In Mauritania, journalists and anti-slavery activists were arrested ahead of the September parliamentary elections. They include Biram Dah Abeid, who remains in detention.

Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, this pattern of state-sponsored intimidation and harassment of human rights defenders persists. For example there were renewed attacks on freedom of expression in Uganda via a tax on social media
use, introduced in July, and several MPs were arrested after participating in a protest march.

In Sudan, opposition figures and human rights defenders were arbitrarily arrested, including 140 activists detained in January and February following sporadic protests over rising food and medicine costs.

In South Sudan, civil society activists continued to be arbitrarily detained, including Bashir Ahmed Mohamed Babiker, a human rights defender, arrested in August.

Eritrea continued its policy of zero tolerance for any form of dissent or free media. In September, Berhane Abrehe, former Finance Minister, became yet one more of the thousands of prisoners of conscience and other detainees after he published a book calling for a peaceful transition to democracy.

In the **Democratic Republic of the Congo, **there was a widespread crackdown on peaceful protests, resulting in multiple deaths and injuries and the sentencing to 12 months’ imprisonment in September of four pro-democracy activists, all members of the Filimbi citizens’ movement.

In Cameroon, Franklin Mowha, a civil society leader, was subjected to a possible enforced disappearance while on a fact-finding mission in the south-west to document internal displacement and the denial of justice. His case illustrates the government’s brutal crackdown and its suppression of information connected with ongoing clashes between the military and armed separatist groups in the Anglophone regions.

The backlash against human rights, and regressive measures to restrict the space in which individuals can defend rights is also evident at the continental bodies level. The independence and autonomy of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights - Africa’s main regional human rights treaty body - suffered a severe setback in August when it revoked the observer status granted to the Coalition of African Lesbians, a civil society organization registered in South Africa. The move came after immense political pressure from the African Union’s Executive Council.

Not all bad news for human rights defenders

Despite the widespread challenges, however, there is some good news for African human rights defenders.

In a few countries, leadership change has provided the impetus for significant improvements. In Ethiopia, thousands of people were released from detention in the first half of 2018, among them Eskinder Nega, the renowned journalist and prisoner of conscience, imprisoned since 2011 on trumped-up terrorism charges. The new Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed, introduced further reforms, including lifting the ban on several opposition parties, initiating the reform of repressive laws and removing arbitrary restrictions on websites and online media groups. However, there were major setbacks. Prisons filled up again when, in September, police arrested more than 3,000 young people and arbitrarily detained over 1,000 in Addis Ababa, including peaceful protesters, claiming it was containing “rising criminality”.

Amidst unprecedented steps towards tackling endemic corruption in Angola after President João Lourenço succeeded the long-serving Eduardo dos Santos in 2017, human rights defenders saw encouraging signs that they would be protected. These included the court acquittals of Rafael Marques de Morais and Mariano Brás, prominent journalists, in July. However, there have been no steps towards investigating past human rights abuses by security forces.

Other notable victories for human rights defenders included the release in April of Tadjadine Mahamat Babouri, known as Mahadine, arrested in September 2016 and tortured in prison for posting online criticism of the Chadian government’s alleged mismanagement of public funds. Meanwhile, international pressure led to the release of Ramón Esono Ebalé, an Equatorial Guinean cartoonist and activist, after six months in Malabo prison.

In Sudan, Matar Younis, a teacher, was released in July after spending a month in prison for criticizing the government’s inhumane practices in Darfur. In Rwanda, Victoire Ingabire, a jailed opposition leader, was pardoned by the President in September. Both countries, however, continue to detain real or perceived opponents.

Ordinary people: extraordinary bravery

The best news of all, however, is the ongoing extraordinary bravery displayed by ordinary people across Africa, including countless courageous women human rights defenders, who exemplify resilience in the face of repression. Women like Wanjeri Nderu, who spearheads a campaign against extrajudicial killings in Kenya; Nonhle Mbuthuma, the land rights activist in **South Africa **who continues to advocate on behalf of her community despite being mistreated by police during a protest in September; and Nigeria’s Aisha Yesufu and Obiageli 'Oby' Ezekwesili, co-founders of the #BringBackOurGirls movement who were arrested in January during a sit-in in the capital, Abuja.

There is no doubt that these are difficult times for human rights defenders in sub-Saharan Africa and, indeed, around the world. Although their work remains dangerous, it is also demonstrably effective. This year proved that Africa’s governments do respond to public pressure. Even in an increasingly hostile atmosphere, the courage, dedication and selflessness of the continent’s human rights defenders are keeping human rights at the front and centre of the regional agenda. In the year that the Universal Declaration turns 70, it is imperative that we acknowledge their victories, resilience and bravery.

World: Crop Prospects and Food Situation, No. 4, December 2018

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

AFRICA Beneficial weather conditions triggered production gains in East Africa and output rebounds in North Africa. By contrast, dry conditions curbed harvests in Southern Africa, while in West Africa, production is expected to revert to average levels. Conflicts in several countries of the region, notably in Central Africa, continue to acutely impact the agriculture sector.
ASIA Cereal harvests in 2018 declined to below-average levels in the Near East and CIS Asia, on account of rainfall deficits, while also ongoing conflicts in parts of the Near East continue to impede agricultural activities. Aggregate cereal production in the Far East is foreseen to rise, driven by an enlarged paddy output.
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN Cereal production is estimated to decline from last year’s record high in South America. In Central America and the Caribbean, extended dry weather conditions have adversely affected the 2018 output, except in Mexico.

World: Statement on the 70th Anniversary of the Genocide Convention and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect
Country: Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Myanmar, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of...

World: Aid in Danger: Security Incident Data Analysis – All Regions (January 2017 – June 2018)

Source: Insecurity Insight
Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, China - Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

World: Un seul monde N° 4 / Décembre 2018

Source: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, World

PAS DE SECURITé NI DE DEVELOPPEMENT SANS RESPECT DES DROITS HUMAINS

Un collegue arnericain me racontait recemment une discussion avec un diplomate originaire d'Asie de l'Est, après la guerre en Irak. II etait question, entre autres, de l'universalité des droits humains. "Ce principe peut-il faire débat?", vous demanderez-vous peut-être. En français comme en anglais, l'intitulé du texte adopté à Paris it y a 70 ans manifeste, en effet, à lui seul la volonté de formuler des droits valables partout et pour tous: "Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme".

Critiqués, des gouvernements ont régulierement, au cours des 70 derrieres annees, rétorqué que les droits humains étaient l'invention d'un Occident devoré par l'individualisme. Ainsi, dans une societe où les interets de la communauté priment ceux de l'individu, la validite de ces prérogatives n'est, selon eux, que relative.

Mon collegue fut surpris: son interlocuteur asiatique concéda en toute franchise que, dans son pays, personne n'avait jamais réellement accordé de crédit à cette rhetorique de la relativisation. Chacun sentait bien, au fond, qu'il était juste de denoncer le traitement brutal réserve aux dissidents par le pouvoir en place. Les révelations de tortures dans les prisons irakiennes, d’exécutions ciblées sans procès aucun et d’autres agissements des forces armées et de sécurité «occidentales», en contradiction éclatante avec les droits fondamentaux, ont marqué une césure radicale. De par son propre comportement, l’Occident a non seulement perdu sa légitimité à critiquer d’autres États, mais également ouvert la voie à une remise en question des droits humains.

On peut contester l’honnêteté du raisonnement. Il n’en demeure pas moins que des pays, qui se sont revendiqués des décennies durant comme garants des droits humains, se sont, dans une large mesure, discrédités. «Nous avons perdu notre grandeur morale», comme le relève mon collègue. «Sans développement, pas de sécurité; sans sécurité, pas de développement. Et ni l’un ni l’autre ne sont possibles sans le respect des droits humains», avait déclaré un jour l’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Kofi Annan, décédé en août dernier.

Dans cet esprit, la coopération suisse soutient plus de 50 projets visant à renforcer les droits humains dans des pays partenaires. L’accent est mis sur la bonne gouvernance, la transparence des décisions gouvernementales, l’État de droit ainsi que la participation de toutes les catégories de la population, en particulier les minorités et les femmes, aux processus politiques et sociaux. En Albanie et en Serbie, la DDC mène des projets en faveur des Roms. En Tunisie, dans la région des Grands Lacs d’Afrique et en Tanzanie, elle contribue à professionnaliser et à rendre indépendant le paysage médiatique local, en encourageant les journalistes à s’affirmer davantage en tant que contrepoids critique au pouvoir étatique. Lors de rencontres personnelles avec certains d’entre eux, dans le Sud-Kivu notamment, j’ai été profondément impressionné par leur courage et leur idéalisme.

Alors que l’«autorité morale» s’affaiblit à certains endroits, elle se renforce ailleurs. Dans les deux cas, la tendance ne va pas de soi. Dans les deux cas, elle n’est pas immuable.

Manuel Sager

Directeur de la DDC

World: Un seul monde N° 4 / Décembre 2018 : LES DROITS HUMAINS SOUS PRESSION

Source: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Country: Afghanistan, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, World

PAS DE SECURITÈ NI DE DEVELOPPEMENT SANS RESPECT DES DROITS HUMAINS

Un collegue arnericain me racontait recemment une discussion avec un diplomate originaire d'Asie de l'Est, après la guerre en Irak. II etait question, entre autres, de l'universalité des droits humains. "Ce principe peut-il faire débat?", vous demanderez-vous peut-être. En français comme en anglais, l'intitulé du texte adopté à Paris it y a 70 ans manifeste, en effet, à lui seul la volonté de formuler des droits valables partout et pour tous: "Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme".

Critiqués, des gouvernements ont régulierement, au cours des 70 derrieres annees, rétorqué que les droits humains étaient l'invention d'un Occident devoré par l'individualisme. Ainsi, dans une societe où les interets de la communauté priment ceux de l'individu, la validite de ces prérogatives n'est, selon eux, que relative.

Mon collegue fut surpris: son interlocuteur asiatique concéda en toute franchise que, dans son pays, personne n'avait jamais réellement accordé de crédit à cette rhetorique de la relativisation. Chacun sentait bien, au fond, qu'il était juste de denoncer le traitement brutal réserve aux dissidents par le pouvoir en place. Les révelations de tortures dans les prisons irakiennes, d’exécutions ciblées sans procès aucun et d’autres agissements des forces armées et de sécurité «occidentales», en contradiction éclatante avec les droits fondamentaux, ont marqué une césure radicale. De par son propre comportement, l’Occident a non seulement perdu sa légitimité à critiquer d’autres États, mais également ouvert la voie à une remise en question des droits humains.

On peut contester l’honnêteté du raisonnement. Il n’en demeure pas moins que des pays, qui se sont revendiqués des décennies durant comme garants des droits humains, se sont, dans une large mesure, discrédités. «Nous avons perdu notre grandeur morale», comme le relève mon collègue. «Sans développement, pas de sécurité; sans sécurité, pas de développement. Et ni l’un ni l’autre ne sont possibles sans le respect des droits humains», avait déclaré un jour l’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Kofi Annan, décédé en août dernier.

Dans cet esprit, la coopération suisse soutient plus de 50 projets visant à renforcer les droits humains dans des pays partenaires. L’accent est mis sur la bonne gouvernance, la transparence des décisions gouvernementales, l’État de droit ainsi que la participation de toutes les catégories de la population, en particulier les minorités et les femmes, aux processus politiques et sociaux. En Albanie et en Serbie, la DDC mène des projets en faveur des Roms. En Tunisie, dans la région des Grands Lacs d’Afrique et en Tanzanie, elle contribue à professionnaliser et à rendre indépendant le paysage médiatique local, en encourageant les journalistes à s’affirmer davantage en tant que contrepoids critique au pouvoir étatique. Lors de rencontres personnelles avec certains d’entre eux, dans le Sud-Kivu notamment, j’ai été profondément impressionné par leur courage et leur idéalisme.

Alors que l’«autorité morale» s’affaiblit à certains endroits, elle se renforce ailleurs. Dans les deux cas, la tendance ne va pas de soi. Dans les deux cas, elle n’est pas immuable.

Manuel Sager

Directeur de la DDC

World: Décisions de financement (HiPs)

Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Iran (Islamic Republic of), occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, World

Les décisions de financement sont des actes juridiques adoptés par la Commission européenne dans le but d’autoriser ECHO à dépenser le budget de l’UE pour atteindre certains objectifs. Il s’agit d’une condition juridique obligatoire pour la signature d’accords avec les organisations humanitaires.

Les décisions de financement identifient, entre autres, la région de mise en œuvre, la crise humanitaire, les objectifs, les fonds disponibles et les partenaires potentiels pour aider ECHO à acheminer l’aide humanitaire. Les décisions sont fondées sur une évaluation des besoins.

Depuis 2012, la Commission européenne adopte chaque année une décision de portée mondiale qui couvre l’ensemble des actions d’aide humanitaire qu’ECHO prévoit de financer sur une période donnée, telles qu’elles sont expliquées dans la stratégie annuelle d’ECHO. Dans le cadre de cette décision mondiale, ECHO prépare et publie des Plans de mise en œuvre humanitaire (HIP), qui fournissent des informations plus détaillées sur les priorités opérationnelles identifiées dans les décisions mondiales sur la base de la stratégie annuelle.

Outre les Plans de mise en œuvre humanitaire, ECHO peut aussi allouer des fonds par le biais de décisions de première urgence, d’urgence ou ad-hoc. Plus d’informations sur le budget d’ECHO.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous la liste des décisions de financement ainsi que des liens vers les décisions des années précédentes. Plus d’informations à ce sujet sur le site web des partenaires.

Des réunions sont organisées tout au long de l’année pour inviter les partenaires à contribuer au processus des décisions de financement. Vous trouverez ici la liste des réunions prévues.

List of decisions

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