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Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 28: 8 – 14 July 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 14 July 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 71 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (environmental sample) in Ghana

  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo

  • Humanitarian crisis in Cameroon

  • Humanitarian crisis in Central African Republic.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

This week, health authorities in Ghana confirmed circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) in an environmental sample. Additionally, two case-patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) tested positive for genetically linked cVDPV2 in Haut Lomami Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The frequency of occurrence of cVDPV2 events in the African Region has been increasing (lately), with three major loci, situated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Lake Chad basin and the Horn of Africa. These epicentres are characterized by major prolonged complex humanitarian emergencies – with insecurity, disrupted health systems and social dislocation. However incidentally, the countries around these epicentres also have conditions that are conducive to the rapid spread of polioviruses, namely accumulation of unprotected persons, suboptimal sanitation and high population mobility. The circulation of vaccine-derived polioviruses in the African region is likely to become a major public health problem if not tackled decisively at this point in time.

The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues. The occurrence of a confirmed case in Goma on 14 July 2019, while long anticipated and prepared for, emphasises the enormous challenges around control of this outbreak, reinforcing the need for strong and consistent implementation of all public health measures. While progress is slowly being made, the ongoing response operations are being challenged by suboptimal resourcing, negatively impacting on the entire response. Member States and other donors are strongly encouraged to provide additional funding in order to ensure that hard won progress in containing this EVD outbreak will not suffer a potentially devastating setback due to financial limitations

World: Drought, Disease and War Hit Global Agriculture, Says U.N.

Source: Inter Press Service
Country: Cambodia, Central African Republic, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mongolia, Mozambique, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

By James Reinl

UNITED NATIONS, Jul 11 2019 (IPS) - The United Nations has warned of drought, disease and war preventing farmers from producing enough food for millions of people across Africa and other regions, leading to the need for major aid operations.

A report called the Crop Prospects and Food Situation by the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) says that shortages of grain and other foodstuffs have left people in 41 countries — 31 of them in Africa — in need of handouts.

“Ongoing conflicts and dry weather conditions remain the primary causes of high levels of severe food insecurity, hampering food availability and access for millions of people,” U.N. spokesman Farhan Haq told reporters on Tuesday.

Southern Africa has experienced both dry spells and rainfall damage from Cyclone Idai, which made landfall in Mozambique on Mar. 14. The storm caused “agricultural production shortfalls” and big “increases in cereal import needs,” added Haq.

Farmers in Zimbabwe and Zambia have seen harvests decline this year. Some three million people faced shortages at the start of 2019, but food price spikes there will likely push that number upwards in the coming months, researchers say.

In eastern Africa, crop yields have dropped in Somalia, Kenya and Sudan due to “severe dryness”, added Haq.

According to the FAO, life for rural herders in Kassala State, in eastern Sudan, has been upended by a drought that has forced them to move livestock away from traditional grazing routes in pursuit of greener pastures.

“Life would be so hard if our livestock died. We wouldn’t have food or milk for the children,” Khalda Mohammed Ibrahim, a farmer near Aroma, in Kassala State, told FAO. “When it is dry, I am afraid the animals will starve — and then we will too.”

Droughts are getting worse, says the U.N. Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD). By 2025, some 1.8 billion people will experience serious water shortages, and two thirds of the world will be “water-stressed”.

In Asia, low yields of wheat and barley outputs are raising concerns in North Korea, where dry spells, heatwaves and flooding have led to what has been called the worst harvests the hermit dictatorship has seen in a decade, the report said.

More than 10 million North Koreans — or 40 percent of the country’s population — are short of food or require aid handouts, the U.N.’s Rome-based agency for agriculture said in its 42-page study.

FAO researchers also addressed the spread of a deadly pig disease in China that has disrupted the world’s biggest pork market and is one of the major risks to a well-supplied global agricultural sector.

China is grappling with African swine fever, which has spread across much of the country this past year. There is no cure or vaccine for the disease, often fatal for pigs although harmless for humans.

By the middle of June, more than 1.1 million pigs had died or been culled. The bug has also been reported in Vietnam, Cambodia, Mongolia, North Korea and Laos, affecting millions of pigs and threatening farmers’ livelihoods.

The FAO forecast a five percent fall in Chinese pork output this year, while imports were predicted to rise to almost two million tonnes from an average 1.6 million tonnes per year from 2016 to 2018.

Conflict is another worry, the FAO said. While Syria and Yemen have seen “generally conducive weather conditions for crops”, fighting between government forces, rebels and other groups in both countries has ravaged agriculture.

Violence in Yemen has triggered what the U.N. calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, with 3.3 million people displaced and 24.1 million — more than two-thirds of the population — in need of aid.

Last month, the U.N.’s World Food Programme (WFP) announced a “partial suspension” of aid affecting 850,000 people in Yemen’s capital Sanaa, saying the Houthi rebels that run the city were diverting food from the needy.

Likewise, in Africa, simmering conflicts in the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan have caused a “dire food security situation”. In South Sudan, seven million people do not have enough food.

World: International Activity Report 2018

Source: Médecins Sans Frontières
Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russian Federation, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

By Dr Marc Biot, Dr Isabelle Defourny, Marcel Langenbach, Kenneth Lavelle, Bertrand Perrochet and Teresa Sancristoval, Directors of Operations

In 2018, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams provided medical and humanitarian assistance to people facing extreme hardship in over 70 countries. From treating war-wounded ever closer to frontlines in Yemen, to responding to epidemic outbreaks such as cholera in Niger, or providing assistance to people fleeing violence in the Central African Republic, emergency response continued to be a core part of our work.

As 2018 drew to a close, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was in the midst of its second Ebola outbreak of the year, and its biggest ever. MSF was part of the response, led by the Ministry of Health. Although rapid and well-resourced, with teams having access to a promising new vaccine and several new drugs with the potential to better protect and treat people, the response, and those managing it, failed to adapt to people’s priorities, and to gain the trust of the community. This lack of trust in the health services meant people delayed or avoided seeking treatment. By the end of the year, the epidemic in North Kivu and Ituri provinces had claimed more than 360 lives and in some areas was still not under control.

Seeking care in war zones

Early in the year, Syrian civilians and medical staff were caught in the violence in Idlib, in the northwest, and in East Ghouta, near the capital Damascus. In East Ghouta, the barrage was relentless in February and March, with waves of dead and injured arriving at MSF- supported hospitals and health posts. As the siege blocked incoming aid, medical staff had few medical supplies to work with. By the end of the offensive, 19 of the 20 hospitals and clinics we supported were destroyed or abandoned, leaving civilians with few options to seek medical help.

The war in Yemen, which has left the country and its healthcare system in ruins, entered its fourth year. The Saudi- and Emirati-led coalition continued to target civilian areas with airstrikes and bombings, including our new cholera treatment centre in Abs. The war is taking a heavy toll on people, who often must negotiate constantly changing frontlines to find care for their war- wounds or their general medical needs. Yemen was the country where our teams treated the highest number of war-wounded in 2018, over 16,000 people. After a major offensive was launched in Hodeidah in June, doctors in our Aden hospital treated Hodeidah residents who had been driven for six hours, the majority of them in a critical condition. Conflict intensified on several frontlines at the end of the year, leading to an influx of people with war-related injuries. We also treated more than 150 people wounded by mines planted by Houthi-led Ansar Allah troops around Mocha. Constant attacks on our staff and patients at facilities in Ad Dhale forced us to withdraw from the town in November.

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 30-June-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian t...

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 27: 1 – 7 July 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 7 July 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 74 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 in Angola
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Dengue fever in Côte d’Ivoire
  • Humanitarian crisis in north-east Nigeria.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • A new case of genetically-distinct circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) has been confirmed in Cuvango district, Huila Province, central Angola. This is the second cVDPV2 outbreak in Angola in 2019, occurring over 1 000 kilometers away from the first event. The occurrence of this event (symbolic) and the increasing frequency of cVDPV2 emergence across the African Region is becoming a major public health issue, given the compromised sanitation situation, high population mobility and challenges faced by the national immunization programmes. While comprehensive responses are being undertaken, these events should serve to remind all countries in the African region of the importance of improving the quality of routine and supplementary immunization activities and maintain high levels of polio (and all other antigens) vaccination coverage to minimize the risk and consequences of poliovirus circulation.

  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with persistent low transmission intensity. The weekly incidence showed some reduction in the number of new confirmed EVD cases this week, albeit with a fluctuating pattern. All efforts to step up and sustain ongoing response operations need to continue.

World: Crop Monitor for Early Warning | July 2019

Source: GEOGLAM
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview:

In East Africa, production prospects are poor for main season cereals in parts of Somalia and Kenya due to a delayed onset of rains and dry conditions. In West Africa, main season maize planting continues across the south of the region and conditions are favourable with good rains received. In the Middle East and North Africa, winter wheat crops are generally favourable due to good rains throughout the season except in parts of Morocco where poor production has resulted from dry conditions, and in Syria and Iraq due to ongoing conflict. In Southern Africa, winter wheat planted in May is favourable, except in Zambia, where dry conditions have carried over from the previous season. In Central and South Asia, winter cereals for harvest in August are favourable despite some dry conditions in May. In Southeast Asia, harvest of dry-season rice is complete in the north and favourable yields resulted except in parts of Thailand and Philippines. Planting of wet-season rice is underway and conditions are favourable with good rains at the start of the season. In Central America and the Caribbean primera season planting started in May and there is some concern due to irregular rainfall and dry conditions.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 26: 24 – 30 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 30 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 76 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Circulating vaccine-derived polio virus type 2 in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Hepatitis E in Namibia
  • Humanitarian crisis in Burkina Faso.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • Health authorities in Democratic Republic of the Congo reported two simultaneous events of genetically-distinct circulating vaccine-derived polio virus type 2 (cVDPV2) in Kasai and Sankuru provinces. In both events, two case-patients with acute flaccid paralysis were confirmed with geneticallylinked circulating vaccine derived poliovirus type 2. The two events become the fifth and sixth genetically-distinct cVDPV2 outbreaks in the country. While comprehensive responses are being undertaken, these events highlight the need to maintain high levels of routine polio vaccination coverage in all countries in the region to minimize the risk and consequences of any poliovirus circulation.
  • The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with insecurity incidents reported in Beni this week targeting Ebola response personnel. The weekly incidence showed minimum reduction in the number of new confirmed EVD cases this week, as the transmission intensity keeps fluctuating. All efforts to step up and sustain ongoing response operations need to continue.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 25: 17 – 23 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 23 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies
occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme
is currently monitoring 77 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key
new and ongoing events, including:

  • Cholera in Nigeria
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Ethiopia
  • Humanitarian crisis in South Sudan.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures
implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and
ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as
recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in North Kivu and Ituri provinces,
Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, with fluctuating transmission
intensity. There has been a period of improved security recently, allowing
response teams to access communities and operate more freely. As a result,
indicators over the past few weeks provide early signs of an easing of the
transmission intensity in major hotspots. However, concerns remain over the
number of new cases still occurring in areas that previously had lower rates of
transmission. Additionally, the lack of funding to support response operations
has reached a worrying level. The international community must step up
funding to support the ongoing response and strengthen preparedness in
Democratic Republic of the Congo and neighbouring countries.

Health authorities in Nigeria have confirmed a new cholera outbreak in Adamawa
State, one of the three states in north-east Nigeria with prolonged complex
humanitarian emergencies. These states are vulnerable to experiencing large
cholera outbreaks, as has been seen in the recent past. It is therefore critical
that the current cholera outbreak is responded to swiftly at the initial stages
to prevent escalation of the situation.

World: World Bank Group Support in Situations Involving Conflict-Induced Displacement – An Independent Evaluation

Source: World Bank
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the Republic of North Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zambia

Highlights

  • In 2016, the World Bank Group stepped up its engagement in situations of conflictinduced forced displacement at the global and country levels and adopted a new approach to its engagement that recognizes displacement as a development challenge that must be addressed to attain the World Bank Group’s twin goals.

  • Since fiscal year 2016, the Bank Group’s analytical, financial, and operational support has become more aligned with its stated development approach building on lessons from past engagements. This is an important shift.

  • Advisory services and analytics have shifted from providing a rationale for Bank Group engagement in situations involving conflictinduced forced displacement to contextspecific needs assessments focused on evidence-based, medium-term solutions.
    The World Bank successfully mobilized new financing to support situations involving conflict-induced forced displacement and crowded-in funding from other donors. World Bank support for populations forcibly displaced by conflict and their host communities has increased, become more balanced, and focused on priority sectors to
    generate economic opportunities. These are significant achievements.

  • At the same time, the Bank Group has not yet fully leveraged its comparative
    advantages in implementing its development approach. Evidence generated
    from analytical and advisory services needs to be translated better into
    context-specific policy dialogue, project design, and programming.
    Project design, in particular, could further address the specific needs and
    vulnerabilities of conflict-induced forcibly displaced persons and their host
    communities, especially the specific needs and vulnerabilities of the women
    and children among them. Projects should also more systematically include
    specific indicators to monitor and evaluate the effects on affected populations.

  • The World Bank engages and coordinates with humanitarian actors and
    development organizations at various levels, but coordination could be further
    strengthened. Additionally, select partnerships at the country level could be
    leveraged to ensure sector coherence and to foster policy dialogue to enact
    institutional reforms toward self-reliance that address the vulnerabilities of
    forcibly displaced persons. The Bank Group could also increase engagement
    to catalyze the private sector’s role in situations of conflict-induced forced
    displacement.

  • Internal and external factors inhibit the Bank Group’s development
    response to address situations of conflict-induced forced displacement.
    Internal factors include varying levels of active leadership in Country
    Management Units, growing but still limited Bank Group experience, and
    incentives. External factors include the varying nature of displacement
    situations, government capacity, macroeconomic and development
    challenges, and complex political economy factors.

Uganda: Uganda Refugees & Asylum Seekers as of 31-May-2019

Source: Government of Uganda
Country: Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian t...

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 24: 10 – 16 June 2019; Data as reported by 17:00; 16 June 2019

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on selected acute public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 75 events in the region. This week’s edition covers key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Ebola virus disease in Uganda
  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Measles in Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Humanitarian crisis in Mali.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • The emergence, this week, of a cluster of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases in Kasese District, western Uganda raised a lot of attention in the region and globally. This event affirmed the continuous risk of spread of the outbreak in the region and re-echoes the importance of enhancing preparedness and readiness measures in the neighbouring countries. The robust response mounted by health authorities in Uganda emphasized one of the key principles of International Health Regulations (IHR) 2005, namely ‘containment at source’. This is premised on attaining requisite capabilities for rapid detection and swift control of health events at their onset, thus preventing escalation of small outbreaks into large epidemics. The event in Uganda is a reminder to all State Parties in the African Region to work towards attaining the core capacities stipulated in the IHR (2005).

  • The Democratic Republic of the Congo has been experiencing recurrent measles outbreaks since 2010, with a significant surge in 2019. The Ministry of Health has formally declared the measles epidemic and is calling for all stakeholders to step up response efforts. The response to the measles outbreak (and many other health events) in Democratic Republic of the Congo have been challenged by under-resourcing, weak health systems, insecurity and social disentanglement.

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