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الجوع يجبر مواطني مقاطعة كيديبو على الفرار إلي يوغندا وكينيا

كشف مسؤول محلي إن المجاعة أجبر مواطني مقاطعة كيديبو بولاية توريت في جنوب السودان ، على الفرار إلي مخيمات اللاجئين بدولتي كينيا و يوغندا الحدوديتين....

تجمع المهنيين السودانيين ينفذ وقفة احتجاجية للمطالبة بزيادة الأجور

نفذ تجمع المهنيين السودانيين ،مساء أمس، وقفة إحتجاجية أمام إتحاد العمال السوداني ،للمطالبة بزيادة الحد الأدنى من الأجور.

تبرعات مالية من المواطنين بجونقلي لصيانة مدرستين ثانويتين

نظمت حكومة ولاية جونقلي في جنوب السودان، يوم الجمعة، نفيراً لجمع التبرعات من المواطنين من أجل إعادة تأهيل مدرستين ثانويتين بمدينة بور.

TPLF chief brands Ethiopia PM ‘anti-reformist’ at regional rally

Leader of the Tigray Peoples Liberation Front, TPLF, says Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed could not be labeled a reformist because he was presiding over chaos. The latest round of ‘attack’ by Debretsion Gebremicheal was during an address at a regional rally held across the northern Tigray region over the last weekend. Dubbed the ‘Respect the …

The post TPLF chief brands Ethiopia PM ‘anti-reformist’ at regional rally appeared first on Igad News.

برلمان أويل يستدعي وزير الحكم المحلي بشأن الضرائب

إستدعى برلمان ولاية أويل بجنوب السودان ، وزير الحكم المحلي أندرو لوال بوولا ، الإسبوع الماضي على خلفية فشل معظم المقاطعات في جمع مبالغ الضرائب المنزلية....

Somaliland: Human Rights Center celebrated Human Rights Day

Worldwide, 10th December is celebrated to mark the date the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted, in 1948. This year is the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which declared the inalienable rights which everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being – “regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, …

The post Somaliland: Human Rights Center celebrated Human Rights Day appeared first on Igad News.

World: Aperçu de la Situation Humanitaire Mondiale 2019 – Version Abrégée

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale

PERSONNES DANS
LE BESOIN 131,7M

PERSONNES DEVANT
RECEVOIR UNE AIDE 93,6M

BESOINS FINANCIERS *
USD 21,9Md

Tendances et défis mondiaux

Malgré les progrès du développement mondial, une personne sur 70 dans le monde est en proie à
une crise et a besoin d’assistance humanitaire et de protection d’urgence.

De plus en plus de personnes sont déplacées par les conflits. Le nombre de personnes déplacées
de force est passé de 59,5 millions en 2014 à 68,5 millions en 2017.

Les catastrophes naturelles et le changement climatique ont un coût humain élevé. Les
catastrophes affectent 350 millions de personnes en moyenne chaque année et causent des
milliards de dollars de dégâts.

L’insécurité alimentaire est en augmentation. En juste deux ans, entre 2015 et 2017, le nombre
de personnes confronté à l’insécurité alimentaire de niveau critique ou pire a augmenté de 80
millions à 124 millions de personnes.

Les crises exacerbent les inégalités entre les sexes. Dans les situations de conflit, les filles ont
une probabilité 2,5 fois plus importante que les garçons d’être déscolarisées.

Les crises humanitaires affectent un plus grand nombre de personnes et durent plus longtemps.
Le nombre de personnes ciblées pour recevoir une assistance dans le cadre des Plans de réponse
humanitaire (HRP) des Nations unies a augmenté de 77 millions en 2014 à 101 millions en 2018.

Les crises humanitaires durent aujourd’hui, en moyenne, plus de neuf ans. Près de trois-quarts
des personnes ciblées pour recevoir de l’assistance en 2018 se trouvent dans des pays affectés
par une crise humanitaire depuis sept ans ou plus.

Les organisations humanitaires réussissent de plus en plus à sauver des vies et à réduire les
souffrances mais de nombreux besoins restent encore sans réponse.

Malgré une augmentation importante des financements de 10,6 milliards de dollars en 2014 à
13,9 milliards de dollars en 2017, le manque de financement des plans de réponse humanitaire
des Nations unies stagne à environ 40%.

2018 est en passe d’être une autre année record pour le financement humanitaire. Au 19
novembre, les donateurs et partenaires avaient fait état de contributions de 13,9 milliards de
dollars aux Plans de réponse humanitaire par rapport à 12,6 milliards de dollars à la même
période l’année dernière.

Les niveaux de financement ont également augmenté. Au 19 novembre, le financement des Plans
de réponse était de 56% par rapport à 52% à la même période en 2018.

Le financement humanitaire mondial a atteint un nouveau summum de 22 milliards de dollars par
rapport aux 21,5 milliards de dollars levés en 2017.

Les crises majeures et prolongées reçoivent la majorité des ressources. Entre 2014 et 2018,
quatre crises – en Somalie, au Soudan du Sud, au Soudan et en Syrie – ont comptabilisé à elles
seules 55% de tous les financements demandés et reçus.

Somaliland: A Matter Of Discovery & A $60 Billion Prize

Every once in a while you come across a nugget of information which is worth its weight in gold, pardon the pun. Somaliland has made tremendous leaps and bounds over the years, whichever way you spin it, the country has had a trove of successes and near misses, along with a few terrible missteps. The …

The post Somaliland: A Matter Of Discovery & A $60 Billion Prize appeared first on Igad News.

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 – Abridged version [EN/AR/ES/ZH]

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

At a glance

PEOPLE IN NEED 131.7M
PEOPLE TO RECEIVE AID 93.6M
FUNDING REQUIRED* $21.9B

Global trends and challenges

Despite global development gains, one in every 70 people around the world is caught up in crisis and urgently needs humanitarian assistance and protection.

More people are being displaced by conflict. The number of forcibly displaced people rose from 59.5 million in 2014 to 68.5 million in 2017.

Natural disasters and climate change have a high human cost. Disasters affect 350 million people on average each year and cause billions of dollars of damage.

Food insecurity is rising. In just two years between 2015 and 2017, the number of people experiencing crisis-level food insecurity or worse increased from 80 million to 124 million people.

Crises exacerbate gender inequalities. Girls in conflict settings are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than boys.

Humanitarian crises affect more people, for longer. The number of people targeted to receive assistance through UN-led humanitarian response plans (HRPs) increased from 77 million in 2014 to 101 million in 2018.

The average humanitarian crisis now lasts more than nine years. Nearly three quarters of people targeted to receive assistance in 2018 are in countries affected by humanitarian crisis for seven years or more.

Humanitarian organizations are increasingly successful in saving lives and reducing suffering, but many needs still remain unmet.

Despite a significant increase in funding, from $10.6 billion in 2014 to $13.9 billion in 2017, the gap in coverage for UN-led humanitarian response plans hovers at about 40 per cent. 2018 is on track to be another record year for humanitarian funding. As of 19 November, donors and partners have reported contributions of $13.9 billion to HRPs, compared with $12.6 billion at the same time last year.

Coverage rates have also increased. As of 19 November, coverage for HRPs was at 56 per cent, compared with 52 per cent at the same time in 2018.

Global humanitarian funding has reached a new high of $22 billion, surpassing the $21.5 billion raised in 2017.

Large protracted crises command the majority of resources. Between 2014 and 2018, just four crises – Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Syria – accounted for 55 per cent of all funding requested and received.

New Turkish Ambassador Presents His Credentials To President Farmajo

The President of the Federal Republic of Somalia, Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo has received the credential from the new Turkish Somalia. Ambassador Mehmet Yilmaz presented a letter to PresidentAbdullahi Farmajo from his Turkish Counterpart President Rajab Tayyip Erdogan. In the letter, President Erdogan thanked the federal government of Somalia and its people for the warm welcome …

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Somalia Lays Out Next Steps To Tackle Corruption

As the world marked International Anti-Corruption Day, the Federal Government of Somalia announced today a series of steps to strengthen its commitment to combat corruption and reinforce transparency in order to build more accountable institutions. At a United Nations-backed event in the capital, Mogadishu, to mark the Day, and attended by senior government officials and …

The post Somalia Lays Out Next Steps To Tackle Corruption appeared first on Igad News.

Mogadishu Residents Rally Against Impeachment Motion Against Farmajo

Hundreds of the residents of Somali capital have gathered in the major streets on Monday to show their support for the government of President Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajoand Prime Minister Hassan Ali Kheyre. Demonstrators who paralyzed traffic along Maka Al Mukarama and Sodonka road before making their way into Daljirka Dahsoon independent square were chanting slogans …

The post Mogadishu Residents Rally Against Impeachment Motion Against Farmajo appeared first on Igad News.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update November 2018 – United Nations Coordinated Appeals

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Launch of the Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 and the World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018 At the end of November 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) require US$ US$24.93 to assist 97.9 million people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The requirements are lower than announced at the end of October ($25.2 billion) as those for Ethiopia have now been reduced. The plans are funded at $14.29 billion; this amounts to 57.3 per cent of financial requirements for 2018.

Two million less people are considered to be in need in Mali than at the end of October, hence the reduction in the overall number of people in need in this month’s overview.

Global requirements are $1.8 billion higher than at this time in 2017, and the amount of funding received is $1.69 billion higher than it was at this time last year.

On 4 December 2018, the USG/ERC launched the Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 and World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2018 at an event in the Council Chamber, United Nations Office of Geneva. The event was attended by almost 200 representatives of Member States, intergovernmental and international organizations, UN organizations and NGOs, and by the Red Cross movement, the World Economic Forum and specialized meteorological foundations. A recording of the event can be found here: Event in Geneva to launch the GHO 2019 and WHDT 2018.

Pooled Funds In 2018, as of early December, country-based pooled funds (CBPF) received a total of US$845 million, once again setting a new record in annual contributions. Generous support from 31 Member States, from one crown dependency and from the general public through the UN Foundation, continues to demonstrate a high level of confidence in this mechanism for reaching the people most affected by humanitarian emergencies. In the past year, CBPFs have allocated a total $695 million, with $81 million awaiting approval. The Yemen Humanitarian Fund (HF) remains the largest of the funds, with $187 million already allocated towards response to urgent humanitarian needs. The HFs in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, South Sudan and Turkey each allocated over $50 million. Globally, three-fifths of all CBPF allocations were disbursed to NGOs, including 24 per cent ($170 million) directly to national and local NGOs. Another two-fifths were allocated to UN agencies, while Red Cross/ Red Crescent organizations received 1 percent of funding ($8 million).

Between 1 January and 30 November 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved $488 million in grants from the Central Emergency

Response Fund (CERF), including $308 million from the Rapid Response Window and $180 million from the Underfunded Emergencies Window.

The grants will support life-saving activities in 48 countries. In November, a total of $11 million was released to scale-up response to cholera in Nigeria and pneumonic plague in Madagascar, as well as to expand existing UN programmes in Venezuela in support of government efforts to increase essential health and nutrition services.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Le HCR lance deux plans de réponse pour les réfugiés en RDC et dans la région

Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan

KINSHASA, 11 DECEMBRE 2018

Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), en coopération avec 60 partenaires, a publié aujourd’hui deux plans de réponse pour 2019-2020 pour la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) et la région. Pour venir en aide aux réfugiés et aux populations hôtes dans d’autres pays d’asile fortement affectés par les conflits, les partenaires lancent un appel de fonds conjoint de 918 millions de dollars américains pour 2019.

L’un des plans est destiné aux congolais ayant fui la RDC dans d’autres pays d’Afrique, et l’autre aux réfugiés qui se trouvent en RDC qui ont fui d’autres pays de la région.

Le plan de Réponse National (2019-2020) pour les réfugiés vivant en RDC est un outil de coordination entre plusieurs acteurs humanitaires et de développement, qui a pour objectif de couvrir les besoins des quatre principales populations de réfugiés (Burundais, Centrafricains, Rwandais et Sud-Soudanais) réparties à travers le territoire congolais.

«Plus d’un demi-million de réfugiés originaires de pays voisins ont été contraints de fuir leurs foyers et trouver refuge en RDC. Ce chiffre continue d’augmenter», a rappelé Ann Encontre, Représentante régionale du HCR en RDC et Coordinatrice pour les réfugiés congolais.

175 millions de dollars seront nécessaires pour réaliser les objectifs de ce plan, en collaboration avec 11 partenaires en RDC.

D’autre part, le plan de Réponse Régional (2019-2020) pour les réfugiés congolais cible 743 millions de dollars, qui devraient permettre de répondre aux besoins les plus urgents. Ces besoins comprennent la protection, l’eau et l’assainissement, la sécurité alimentaire, la santé, et l’éducation des réfugiés congolais se trouvant en dehors de la RDC.

Compte tenu de la capacité limitée des communautés d'accueil à supporter l'impact d'un nombre massif de réfugiés, les deux stratégies de réponse aideront également les populations locales, renforçant ainsi la coexistence pacifique entre les réfugiés et les communautés d'accueil.

« En soutenant le développement de moyens de subsistance viables et en adoptant une approche fondée sur la résilience, les réfugiés pourront contribuer au développement de leur pays d'accueil et de leur pays d'origine à leur retour », a conclu Ann Encontre.

La RDC accueille 531.819 réfugiés dont la plupart ont fui les violences dans les pays limitrophes. On compte également 781.917 réfugiés congolais vivant dans les pays principaux d’asile en Afrique.

Les plans de réponse pour les réfugiés seront disponible sous : https://data2.unhcr.org/en/situations/drc

Harvard ranks South Sudanese girls the most well mannered in Africa

As South Sudanese we think we know our South Sudanese girls until an outsider briefs you about their personality traits. We judge our own at times but envy strangers capable of doing what you can`t predict. Black Men`s Forum (BMF), an organization owned by black men at Harvard University carried out a survey asking men […]

The post Harvard ranks South Sudanese girls the most well mannered in Africa appeared first on Juba Eye.

Serving in South Sudan: A Ghanaian UN volunteer's journey and his first UN Volunteers Day

The author, Gideon Sackitey (right) helps colleagues to offload mattresses - part of the items they donated to the children's ward at Bor Town Hospital - from a truck.

It was all joy in August this year when I received an email that I had been selected as a United Nations Volunteer; I would be serving as a Public Information Officer with the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). The excitement was palpable!

I had been looking forward to working abroad and then out of the blue came this wonderful opportunity to volunteer in South Sudan – a nation with a chequered history, but with such huge potential. I didn’t expect it to be so sudden.

Immediately, I started reading about the country, the geopolitical nuances, and my role.

I left Accra on the 17th of October 2018 and arrived in Juba the next day, on the 18th. It was my first mission and first time in South Sudan. I had no clue what kind of environment I was coming to, except that there was a peacekeeping mission in place and that the place was baking hot!

Coming down the Kenya Airways flight, I was overtaken by the heat first which stood at close to 37 degrees Celsius that Thursday afternoon. I would soon have to adapt to this.

A week and a half later, after induction and a near one-hour helicopter flight – my first – I was finally in Bor, in South Sudan’s Jonglei region. This would be my duty station. It was not exactly what I expected, I must confess. But my training and experience makes me adjustable to any condition, and Bor promised to be one.

On the job, my expectations were high. I had been a journalist and communications specialist for almost two decades. I was close to news reports of countries and children in conflict situations, and seeing volunteers on the ground providing comfort and hope. And in many instances, change finally came through.

This time it was me, on the ground to volunteer my expertise; leading the field Public Information team to communicate the Mandate of the UN Mission: protection of civilians; monitoring and investigating human rights; creating conditions for the delivery of humanitarian assistance, and supporting the implementation of the peace agreement.

Not too long after, the International Volunteers Day 2018, celebrated every 5th of December, was beckoning. I started wondering what it was all about. Then preparatory meetings started, and to my surprise, colleagues asked that I lead volunteers in Bor to steer the preparatory team. My first reaction was, “You guys have never met me, don’t know me; I wonder why you’re choosing me!” But they wouldn’t budge. I still don’t know why they chose me, but then volunteering means offering to lead, too.

So, somehow, I agreed, and preparations started. “What are we going to do?” we asked ourselves. After a few minutes we agreed to donate some items to the Bor Town hospital. But that was too big. So, we chose the children’s hospital. Reason? Because children are the most delicate members of any society, and volunteering to help them was contributing to the future of the state.

But I was a bit worried. I had been following events on twitter, especially of what the day was to be and what was expected, and realized our event was rather small and low-key in character, compared to what other volunteers were doing.

“It is the act. It is the spirit behind it that matters,” Alieu Jammeh, a UN volunteer said, virtually convincing us all that it was not some big deed.

And then, 5 December 2018 was here! The three words – International Volunteers Day – were everywhere on the internet. On social media, the hashtag #IVD2018 was trending. By this time, what the day stood for had sunk in: I had come to understand that it was the day set aside for volunteers to reach out to the communities and celebrate the work they do.

The United Nations had chosen this year’s theme as ‘Building Resilient Communities’.

For us, UN volunteers in Bor town, it was the culmination of several actions that saw us presenting items to the children’s ward at the Bor Town Hospital: more than 100 blankets; 10 buckets; 45 mattresses; 43 beds; a carton of baby Cerelac; six large size Infant Milk formula; cutlasses; several sweeping brushes, and rubber boots for hospital staff.

The Acting Director of Bor State Hospital Dr. Moses Gak was more than excited as he joined the volunteers to unload the truck with the items.

“We are very glad for this donation as it would give us some real relief,” he said, recounting the challenges he faces in the task of providing health care to his patients. “Most of the beds in the wards are broken,” said the doctor, his words getting drowned by the overwhelming feeling of joy.  

I still think we could have given more; done more. The fact is we could, but as one volunteer, Marzia Guadalupi put it: “We have another opportunity to find the need and fulfil it.”

Indeed, for us, as it was for other volunteers, it was an opportunity to build strong, viable and sustainable communities across the world.

I am smiling now, as I look forward to 5 December 2019, to celebrate volunteering again.

World: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 49: 1 – 7 December 2018 Data as reported by 17:00; 7 December 2018

Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Princ...

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